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Off-Topic What's your source of motivation?

Eyetic

Level 5 Valued Member
Ultimately am pretty sure I’d need hypnosis regression to really explain why I won’t stop training, or just look at the imagery of my early youth - challenge accepted:

John Carter! The Conan of Mars!

Back on topic I guess my motivation is just to live longer as a T1 diabetic I know my days are counted and my life expectancy is overall lower so I need it to keep my glicemic control, guess side effects are the better looking, relaxation and so on..

 

George Vrotsos

Level 7 Valued Member
Two sets of questions for you all!
1. Where does your motivation/discipline/just-do-it - it come from?

2. For those folks who don't have what it takes in #1: What is a good, low-barrier (bodyweight, I think) entry "program" that will result in a positive feedback loop to encourage them to stay the course, and hopefully dig deeper over time?
1a. Not shaming anyone, just being brutally honest. Go to walmart. Look around. That's a likely outcome w/o a little bit of physical training and nutrition planning. I'm not ending my life in a scooter or winded from walking. That's my base level of motivation.

1b. Having "something" to train for helps. Active job and/or hobby, sport etc.

1c. For someone coming off the couch, I believe a mantra helps. Watch Simon Sinek's Start with Why Ted Talk. Find the beginner's why for wanting to train/eat healthy. Help them boil it down into a short saying, 5 words or less. It was "Lean & Fierce" for me when I needed to get back in shape 11 years ago. Having that saying front of mind helped.
Beer and chips? A simple "no" response would only work so many times. Beer and chips? "No because Lean & Fierce" kept me on course a lot easier. It made saying no to temptations easy.

2. Not a trainer but I think a Dan John punch-the-clock workout for 30-60 days is the way to start. 1 kettlebell. 2H Swings, Goblet Squats, pushups, 3x per week. Build the habit.
 
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Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
Fear.

(Storytime)

When I was in high school, an elder from our church moved from Los Angeles to San Diego.
He would be closer to family, and friends, and he would be living in a small beachside bungalow, in a beautiful neighborhood.
I was one of several people helping him to do so.

To sum it up:
He couldn't move one box on his own.
He couldn't move a chair.
He could hardly carry a small painting to the back seat of their car.
I am terrified of this.

Now, I don't find fault with him, as a man. He was older than 80 years old, and unlike others, he could finally find rest, and there's some well-deserved commendation for the way he lived his life and raised his family. And, while he could still walk, he had a hard time getting up the only step in the walkway to his new home. I didn't know it then, but a seed was planted in my mind. And, it germinated slowly. I know now that I am terrified of this. I seek a lifelong journey of staving off such a fate beyond my own lifespan. I hope to be as spry and capable as one could be at such a time.

I want to be able to move all my things and furniture until the day I die.
I don't necessarily want to do it, but I want to be able to if no one was around.
 
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Xcal

Level 5 Valued Member
ummm this is really a wonderful coincidence. I've been thinking about this question for the past hour, and now see this link in my mail-box.

I read his book "Screw it Just do it", and think that this simply sums it up for me:) Trying out new things for myself then deciding wether to keep going, drop out, or modify it to my personal usage. this is a habbit that has motivated me since I was a child (in the 70s).
 

CameronMiller

First Post
- For the challenge
- Sheer vanity
- To inspire others
- To compete with my brother in law
- Because exercise is great for your mental health
-Also great for your physical health
- Because my dad used to beat the s*** out of me when I was a child and I need to be as physically capable as others around me to feel safe
- Training was something I got good at, or ok at rather than something I was always good at
- because most people don't
- Because it helps you sleep better
- You can make love for longer lol
- It's part of the way I express myself
- Because Life's too civilised
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
ummm this is really a wonderful coincidence. I've been thinking about this question for the past hour, and now see this link in my mail-box.

I read his book "Screw it Just do it", and think that this simply sums it up for me:) Trying out new things for myself then deciding wether to keep going, drop out, or modify it to my personal usage. this is a habbit that has motivated me since I was a child (in the 70s).
“What words keep you centered and motivated when you wake up? “
Coffee…
 

Bentelephantrunks

Level 2 Valued Member
Not sure if you have come across the work of Gretchen Rubin who has developed a really interesting questionnaire around something she has developed called 'The Four Tendencies'. These are essentially your relationship to internal expectations and external expectations. The tendencies are Upholder- responds readily to outer and inner expectations, Questioner -resists outer expectations, meets inner expectations, Obliger - meets outer expectations and resists inner expectations and Rebel - resists both outer and inner expectations.

And for me, understanding where I sat was enlightening as to why I was motivated to do some things but not motivated to do others. I'm not sure if anyone else has used this, and there is a link to the questionnaire below, but even if it starts you thinking about internal and external expectations, it will get you thinking differently about why you do or don't do things.


I'm not a paid member of her team, honest, but she also has a fascinating book exploring Habit, and the formation of Habit. Super interesting breakdown of multiple areas that are needed to create Habits. Again, even if it just a beginning, it will get you thinking differently about yourself and your choices.
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
Admittedly, my motivation is easy.

Failing to train could potentially cost me my life or the life of someone else.

Pretty good kick in the backside to get moving on a day I don't feel like it.
Ulysses Pacts are pretty powerful stuff.
I know I never paid any real attention to endurance until I committed to a responsibility that required it.
 

TimothyGander

Level 5 Valued Member
I no longer need motivation to train. I enjoy it and it is a part of who I am. I want to be as capable as possible, I enjoy being independent and able to live more freely, I want to be as useful to people who I care about as I can. I'm generally a paranoid and distrustful person and I'm somewhat comforted by feeling of being capable of surviving in a harsher environment. But nowadays I don't even think too much about any of this stuff, I just train because I'm a guy who trains.

A major motivation that started my fitness journey was an accident that kept me bedridden for a period of time. The feeling of helplessness and being a burden to everyone around me... never again. And I think that is something that may encourage many people to train. Just recently my middle aged aunt, who has for years claimed any kind of physical training is a "waste of time" and "for men only", has suddenly changed her tune after seeing her sedentary mother quickly lose mobility and independence. I think a trip to a nearest nursing home would get many sedentary people in a gym quickly.

I don't think bodyweight is the best option for a sedentary, unmotivated beginner. Most such people cannot perform any useful BW exercise even for a single rep. Moreover, I think to keep them motivated it's important that they notice some improvement quickly. My idea for my aunt is to progress her from an unloaded hip hinge to a proper kettlebell deadlift, and then, if possible, to the two-armed swing. Once she gets into a routine and no longer needs to be motivated, we might talk about other lifts and exercises.
 

Hrungnir

Level 5 Valued Member
I enjoy eating and drinking immensely and it’s part of my work. Working out let’s me maintain a semblance of health despite my lifestyle.

Also as the realities of balding become less deniable by the day. I am prepping for more of a Mr. Clean look than Danny Devito lol
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I enjoy eating and drinking immensely and it’s part of my work. Working out let’s me maintain a semblance of health despite my lifestyle.

Also as the realities of balding become less deniable by the day. I am prepping for more of a Mr. Clean look than Danny Devito lol
Yeah, go for the Yul Bynner look.
 

WhatWouldHulkDo

Level 7 Valued Member
@Adachi beat me to it, but the two greatest motivators in the world are fear and greed. I don't mean to be cynical, but I think all motivators find their roots there.

I am greedy for my family to look at what I'm capable of with awe. I fear them to look on me with pity.

I am greedy for the feeling of testosterone-laden physical confidence, and being the classic protector. I fear being challenged and being unequal to the task.

I am greedy for cheeseburgers & beer. I fear that, unchecked, cheeseburgers & beer will cut my life short (giving me less time to enjoy cheeseburgers & beer).

Once you accept your fears & greed, you find the best ways to cope with them. Some of us do that in healthier ways than others, of course...
 

TedM

Level 5 Valued Member
Fear.

(Storytime)

When I was in high school, an elder from our church moved from Los Angeles to San Diego.
He would be closer to family, and friends, and he would be living in a small beachside bungalow, in a beautiful neighborhood.
I was one of several people helping him to do so.

To sum it up:
He couldn't move one box on his own.
He couldn't move a chair.
He could hardly carry a small painting to the back seat of their car.
I am terrified of this.

Now, I don't find fault with him, as a man. He was older than 80 years old, and unlike others, he could finally find rest, and there's some well-deserved commendation for the way he lived his life and raised his family. And, while he could still walk, he had a hard time getting up the only step in the walkway to his new home. I didn't know it then, but a seed was planted in my mind. And, it germinated slowly. I know now that I am terrified of this. I seek a lifelong journey of staving off such a fate beyond my own lifespan. I hope to be as spry and capable as one could be at such a time.

I want to be able to move all my things and furniture until the day I die.
I don't necessarily want to do it, but I want to be able to if no one was around.
Thanks for sharing that. You've mentioned the "move your own furniture" image several times, and it's meaningful to know the vivid origin.

(By the way, Adachi authored my very favorite post, mentioning the moving furniture theme, here: Kettlebell - Is simple and sinister all you need? )
 

ali

Level 6 Valued Member
I've always been active and athletic, so that's just what I consider normal. I

Just read through the thread before stating my take and got a bit spooked by Steve's entry....pretty much me too! Including the dog ownership.

I need no motivation too, training and physical pursuits are a norm. Some norms are more equal than others and sometimes life's randomness knocks things off a bit. But it's not that I need motivation to get back into my preferred norm. Makes me wonder if motivation is the right descriptive word or if it is an internal state or derived from external influence, a mixture of both probably.
But, yeah, no motivation required.
 

Catherine Buck Le

Level 5 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
1. Where does your motivation/discipline/just-do-it - it come from?
Hi @TedM,

There are lots of helpful ways to look at this and already-valuable comments here.

Here's what I would add:

Read the book "Atomic Habits" by James Clear. It took me a few times through the book to really absorb and embrace everything in it, but the way he explains habit formation is ground-breaking.

Specifically in response to your question, he talks about the power of identity-based habits. This blog talks specifically about this concept — check it out:
jamesclear.com/identity-based-habits

What you do every day, how often you train, how you train... it's not about an outcome you want to achieve. It's just who you are. Basing your habits in your identity is more powerful than pinning your habits on a desired outcome.

Hope that helps! Happy training!
 

steve-in-kville

Level 4 Valued Member
The fact I could be a grandfather sometime soon! Seriously, I want to be physically and mentally strong for my family.
 
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