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Old Forum Who logs their workouts?

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RussellPeele

Level 3 Valued Member
you don't THINK so, but you don't know where you'd be without it (you don't have a "control group" you who uses no log to compare to) ... that being said, the log is most useful for troubleshooting. there will be a time when your progress disappoints you a bit (if not, great). Then you can go back to now and contrast what you were doing right vs what you've been doing wrong.
 

WxHerk

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
2012 was the first time I kept a training log over a full year.  I also dropped from 238 lbs & approx 25% BF on 18 Jan to 191 and 7% BF by 18 December.  Not a coincidence that I was able to see measurable progress over the course of the year.  One thing I record is my heart rate after each "set."  It is a definite sign of improvement to see it come down from the 180's to the high 150's after two sets of 50 snatches with the 24 kg.

Also, kinda like Halley's comet, my abs made an appearance for the first time in over 30 years.  Even at 49, I'm a bit proud of that.
 

Craig Culver

Level 1 Valued Member
Mark, I hear you. Want to make some better PR's, just train smart and log your work outs. As a 49 years old man I have made better training PR's then I was 39 years old or even 20 years old.
I still have a have a gym membership  and the most of the folks whom train at my home gym do not even bother to log their work out. Anybody whom do not log their work out just don't have a good reason why they ever workout in the first place.
 

yogadude

Level 3 Valued Member
I have always logged my strength workouts.  I read Mark Reifkind and Steve Friedes regularly and we are lucky to have them active on the forums!

I started blogging my workouts instead of keeping a paper training journal.  I have specific training goals  written down the side of my blog which is  nice reminder of how much work I have to do :) http://runyoncanyonbootcamp.blogspot.com/

 
 

citizenfox

Level 2 Valued Member
I nice kept a log for almost a week.  Can't log workouts. I do whatever I feel like doing that day. I love the sound of plans and programs, but reality is I do what I can do everyday.
 

Rob Lawrence

Level 3 Valued Member
Most people should not try to be like Bill. Bill is zen. Most likely you are not. Make an honest attempt at logging your workouts and honestly fail before concluding that you are.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Rob makes an excellent point.

I'd like to add that, for many people, this needn't be an either/or proposition.  When I was first introduced to kettlebells, I didn't keep a log and I made great progress and thoroughly enjoyed my training for years.  I trained "intuitively" as we sometimes describe it with very good results.

But the only constant is change.  I now find my training logs absolutely indispensable.  Every workout, as I start, begins with me opening a new blog entry to record what I'm about to do while also looking back over the previous several days and the previous week as well to determine the poundages and the goals for the workout.  For certain types of training, I don't see how you can avoid keeping records, e.g., I'm adding 5 lbs. per workout, twice a week, for some lifts, 5 lbs. per workout, once a week, for others, 10 lbs. per week, once a week, for yet others, keeping the weight constant and adding reps or reducing rest periods or both for some kettlebell lifts - it's just not possible to keep all that in your head.

Good judgement trumps everything - if you feel you need a workout log and haven't yet started one, you have no excuses - get to it.  You decide if it's the first thing for you.

-S-
Steve Freides, StrongFirst Team Leader
http://www.kbnj.com
http://RideChickens.blogspot.com
http://StrongFirst.com
 

bencrush

Level 6 Valued Member
I've logged every workout since my very first one at age 15.  I'm 37 now.  So there are a lot of notebooks.

I love what Dan John said about - "don’t ask me twice about what you are doing wrong."<!-- .bbp-reply-content -->
 
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