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Kettlebell Why is S&S boring?

MikeL

Level 5 Valued Member
Just do another program. I went for ROP when I realised S&S wasn’t my thing. Tried S&S again afterwards, and I have done the program once or twice when I’ve only had 20 minutes to train. It’s a gateway drug. Some people will take it recreationally and never move on. For others, it’s just the start of a horrifyingly expensive addiction.?
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
Haven't read all answers, but I used S&S with more variability to fit my circumstances.

Could be 6,8,10, or 12 sets per arm per day. (Favour 8 and 10 by assining to die-sides to them).
Or sometimes do 20x5 if you feel like it.

Is used the delta-20 principle and used sets of 5 to 10.

PS: I know that following the KBSF Swings and Getups plan last year I had a bit of mental challenge with the medium and light day, because I knew exactly how long it would take. But I took it as a challenge to be more mindful.
 

djm

Level 1 Valued Member
I didn't find SS too boring. I was new to KB, so there was alot of dialing in of the movements as I progressed. Listening to podcasts on work set days and pumping music on test days helps relieve any boredom imo. After problem solving all day, it was good to enjoy the simplicity of just doing.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
No I haven't. It's so cliche, but isn't most people's goals to be healthy, strong, and look good naked? I would like to beat the beast by my forty-eighth birthrite day (which is two and a half years away).
There's four goals there. Defining what they mean and developing a plan that fits all of them might help. If you hate doing something or don't buy-in with what you are doing, that risks consistency.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I would like to conquer the beast sitting by my rack. It's a goal I have, I just really question the fortitude I have of beating the boredom.
You talking Sinister ?
The glamour comes at the end.
Chop wood, carry water.

I rarely swing. Similar to yourself I prefer other lifts. But if the goal is important enough you'll put in the work.
You could conquer the Beast with The Beast Tamer. No boredom there.
 
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BrianCF

Level 7 Valued Member
I don't have a problem with boredom. I can do almost any program for 6-8 weeks. Currently 14 days into Easy Strength with kettlebells.
What's good about some programs is the simplicity. Punch the clock get it done. There's no having to get psyched up to drag yourself to do them. No dread or anxiety of heavy day, other than testing yourself.

The problem I have with some programs such as the ROP and S+S is the, "you need to do 48kg swings and getups to be truly sinister or, 200 snatches and 1/2 bw press." There is the attitude of "if you didn't make it comrade, and quit, you failed." I call BS on all of that type of garbage.

For 95% of us you're not going to get there. There is a wall, and you're either going to have to accept that you hit it or get injured running through it. I started kettlebells when I was 40. If I started 10 years earlier, I might have had a shot.

99% of 1 hand beast swings are ugly. Heavy getups are taxing on the CNS and one slip up,and bye bye bell. Is it worth it? I tested and did the getups and swings with a 40kg. Couldn't imagine adding 18 more lb.

If you're bored, run 6 week cycles of it.
 

blad51

Level 6 Valued Member
I love the debate and information that we have here on this Forum. I love how people are generous with their knowledge and support. I love the passion we have for our favorite mode of exercise.

BUT we have to be mindful of the fact that our on-line community is VERY diverse in our fitness levels, our ages, and our goals. On any given day on this Forum we have posts from members training for power/olympic lifting meets to information gathering visits from unregistered folks who are curious about kettlebells. We come to this Forum at different points in our fitness jouney. The point of view and skill set of someone who is training to be a SFG is different from a person who found our Forum looking for some tips on how to avoid hurting his or her back doing 2 handed swings with a 20lbs bell.

For the new KB practioner or the newly serious KB practioner, Simple and Sinister is an excellent choice to learn technique and build a full body foundation of strength. (If you do the warm-up and cool-down S&S is more than just two lifts.) Also, there is discipline involved in S&S. A type of discipline that seems to be missing in our electronic driven instant gratification world. Everything you do doesn't have to be entertaining. S&S is a program that if you commit yourself to following, you will accomplish the goal. (Even if it takes some time.)

If a one takes S&S to at least the Timeless Simple standard, that opens the whole world of weight training and fitness goals up to that person. They could change programs, modalities, or accomplish Timed Simple. They will have a full body foundation of strength and technical knowledge about KBs (and weight training) that will serve them well. Or they could be happy with results they have gotten and bang out S&S every day in perpetuity as part of their daily fitness routine to maintain their general fitness.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
The problem I have with some programs such as the ROP and S+S is the, "you need to do 48kg swings and getups to be truly sinister or, 200 snatches and 1/2 bw press." There is the attitude of "if you didn't make it comrade, and quit, you failed." I call BS on all of that type of garbage.

I agree with this, but also feel like Pavel has greatly changed this aspect the last decade. In the original S&S, this is definitely the feeling I got and figured it’s only a matter of time to hit sinister. The revised edition straightens this out better that Simple is an admirable goal, but sinister is NOT for everyone.
 

Jeff Roark

Level 6 Valued Member
... its because the getups are the boring part.

Like once you get the movement and the mobility to do them... just move on.
what baffles me is the so called mastery of these 2 movements. It took me all of about 10 minute to figure them out. I did the S&S for a warmup for a bit, and it was simply a sinister waste of my time. I tossed and went back to my normal warmup so I could get on with something that would actually put some muscle and power in my body.
 

Eyetic

Level 5 Valued Member
what baffles me is the so called mastery of these 2 movements. It took me all of about 10 minute to figure them out. I did the S&S for a warmup for a bit, and it was simply a sinister waste of my time. I tossed and went back to my normal warmup so I could get on with something that would actually put some muscle and power in my body.
Don't think that program was intended to be used as a warmup, and if your main goal is to put on muscle its not the best stand alone program either, but calling it a waste of time seems to me a bit disrespectful.

Program is solid, its a welcome door to many beginners in the SF community, if you come from innactivity or even from rehab it can provide you a solid base. As a matter of fact I used it to rehab my shoulder and it worked, from 16 to 32 kgs. Its a proven tool to many.

Is it boring? well...my wife (crossfit junkie) watched me doing The Giant for almost a year and she considers it boring as hell, she also considered S&S and Q&D boring... guess it depends on each person.
 

Birddog

Level 3 Valued Member
IMO I found the simplicity of it a relief. You show up and train without having to think about much. As others said, it was my gateway into KBs. I learned a lot reaching Simple. As most things in life, there is more than one way to skin a cat. I alternated days of S&S with Original Strength. If you find daily S&S too boring, simply adjust or dont do it. There is no rule you have to complete the program. Do what you enjoy!
I still do swings and TGUs in my training because I enjoy them. If I didnt, I would do something else.
 

Jeff Roark

Level 6 Valued Member
Don't think that program was intended to be used as a warmup, and if your main goal is to put on muscle its not the best stand alone program either, but calling it a waste of time seems to me a bit disrespectful.

Program is solid, its a welcome door to many beginners in the SF community, if you come from innactivity or even from rehab it can provide you a solid base. As a matter of fact I used it to rehab my shoulder and it worked, from 16 to 32 kgs. Its a proven tool to many.

Is it boring? well...my wife (crossfit junkie) watched me doing The Giant for almost a year and she considers it boring as hell, she also considered S&S and Q&D boring... guess it depends on each person.
Not meant to disrespect, but it was a waste of time for me. I think most would be better off doing weighted incline situps with one arm extended, heavy repetition lunges, and swings. You can load them heavier and when you want to roll over to do the Sinister or what ever level you choose, it will just need a little groove work and it should be not much of an issue.

I did a get up with a 115lb barbell, and I saw no need to go any further. I think that time would be much better spent with KBs doing Snatch, C&P, and Front Squats if one wants strength and muscle. Like the OP, he wants muscle, but wants sinister to say he has done it. He needs to make a choice as to what is most important.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
I don't have a problem with boredom. I can do almost any program for 6-8 weeks. Currently 14 days into Easy Strength with kettlebells.
What's good about some programs is the simplicity. Punch the clock get it done. There's no having to get psyched up to drag yourself to do them. No dread or anxiety of heavy day, other than testing yourself.

The problem I have with some programs such as the ROP and S+S is the, "you need to do 48kg swings and getups to be truly sinister or, 200 snatches and 1/2 bw press." There is the attitude of "if you didn't make it comrade, and quit, you failed." I call BS on all of that type of garbage.

For 95% of us you're not going to get there. There is a wall, and you're either going to have to accept that you hit it or get injured running through it. I started kettlebells when I was 40. If I started 10 years earlier, I might have had a shot.

99% of 1 hand beast swings are ugly. Heavy getups are taxing on the CNS and one slip up,and bye bye bell. Is it worth it? I tested and did the getups and swings with a 40kg. Couldn't imagine adding 18 more lb.

If you're bored, run 6 week cycles of it.

If I had to choose between chasing an impossibly high bar that I might never reach, or setting it too low, I'd prefer the former.

A lot of the accomplishments I'm proud of were chasing something really hard.
 
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