Why You Should Not Be Running by Mark Rippetoe

Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)

conor78

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I generally run once a week, 60 min maff style. I enjoy it but it's as much as I want to do. I ran a half marathon last year with minimal training and it was tough. I don't think my ankles and hips would thank me for doing more than this. I have friends who are triathletes and the distances they are covering each week is substantial. Most of them are carrying injuries as well. I enjoy a trail run or a 5km run but I don't worry about times etc. I only really run for cardio health and to help supplement my kettlebell work.
 

banzaiengr

Level 7 Valued Member
Here's my take (and this is somewhat timely, because I went for my first run in a year this AM):

I used to run exclusively. I was, in hindsight, not very strong outside of the ability to drag my carcass long distances. I found strength training, it fit better with my goals and my schedule, and running fell by the wayside.

I ran for 20 minutes this morning, and even after a year of S&S and RoP, I felt like I'd been through a steamroller when I was finished. But I also felt really good mentally; I had to negotiate with myself for some of the long slow uphills, and it took a lot of willpower not to walk. I am very glad I ran, and my current goal is very modest-6 miles per week (2miles 3x a week), working up to around 12 miles per week (4 miles 3x a week or 3 miles 4x a week). I'm not running to train for 1/2 marathons anymore, I'm just aiming to run because there's something really relaxing and mentally freeing about a 1/2 hr to 45 minutes where the only thing that matters is relentlessly moving forwards. Outside, in rain or shine, getting air and experiencing the seasons and the world changing each run. Will it improve my endurance, and probably round out my workouts slightly? Absolutely. Is that why I'm doing it? Nope. I've hit a point in life where running isn't my primary exercise, this is purely for the experience.

Now, having said that, as far as exercise and fitness go, I have found that strength comes more naturally to me than running. At best, I might get my mile times down to 10 minute miles at a relatively easy pace. But I know I can clean and press a 25lb kettlebell over 50x, I can swing a 50lb kettlebell 100x in 5 minutes, I am learning to snatch...and I feel my body responding and changing positively in a way that it never did from running. I never felt like I had massive improvements in running beyond endurance-I never picked up speed naturally, and it took me a brutally long time to break 30 minutes in a 5k. But I've experienced progression in kettlebells, and I find a different kind of fitness and peace there.

But I don't think you can discount or dismiss the importance of spending time outside exerting yourself to move forwards. Whether it's a walk, a run, or a hike, there's something mentally soothing you can't capture in any other way.

(As an aside, treadmills can burn in hell. I've done laps in parking garages over running on hotel treadmills. I regret nothing.)
I would say that you hit on many things that I always liked about running. Being outdoors, the peace and solitude of the run, and the sense of accomplishment. But the simplicity of it. All you needed was a good pair of shoes. 50 push-ups, 100 sit ups and out the door. Unfortunately it is most likely that I will never run again recreationally.
 

william bad butt

Level 6 Valued Member
I haven't gone for a long run in years, in 2012, I ran 6 miles for a work event (my last distance run). Folks at work asked me to participate because they assumed I was a runner (because I workout and such). I definitely did not impress anybody that day but I was able to make it through the run and hold my own.

I do walk my 3 large dogs about 1 mile every day (sometimes twice per day). Sometimes I take them running (or they take me running). This is very short distance, 1/4 to 1/2 mile, but the dogs are dragging me and I am running at about as fast as I can. In terms of my current state of conditioning, I am not really in bad aerobic condition, but I am currently more suited to be like a running back vs a marathon runner.

Sometimes I wear a 75 lb weighted vest when walking them, if I walk very fast this gets my heart rate moving. Being a dog owner definitely helps my aerobic base, not sure if I would move around as much without them.

Although I haven't done it in a while, for a long time, I used to incorporate weekly 130 lb sandbag carries and 40 yard sprinting into my weekly routine. I got the sandbag idea from Brooks Kubik, "Dinosaur Training", years ago. I will probably cycle this back into my workouts this spring summer.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
My take on this would be, if you only have time for one do resistance training, especially as we age (he does repeat the age factor several times). Gravity is what eventually brings us down, only the ability to resist it with a surplus allows us to move about in the first place.

Age related muscle loss puts one at higher risk of accidental falls and IIRC a higher incidence of fracture when a fall does occur.

As we age if our primary mode of fitness isn't resistance training we atrophy and running won't help that. That said I agree 100% with the above comments that a moderate amount of running is not going to inhibit muscle growth or maintenance. Wind sprints and related high intensity/short duration locomotion compliment strength training very nicely, as does just taking a walk.
 

ShawnM

Level 8 Valued Member
While some people enjoy slow running as far as training goes, sprint has so much more bang for the buck. It takes less time, builds muscles and lung power and has more long term benefits. That and the shorter duration does kill your joints as much.
 

Questionfear

Level 5 Valued Member
My take on this would be, if you only have time for one do resistance training, especially as we age (he does repeat the age factor several times). Gravity is what eventually brings us down, only the ability to resist it with a surplus allows us to move about in the first place.

Age related muscle loss puts one at higher risk of accidental falls and IIRC a higher incidence of fracture when a fall does occur.

As we age if our primary mode of fitness isn't resistance training we atrophy and running won't help that. That said I agree 100% with the above comments that a moderate amount of running is not going to inhibit muscle growth or maintenance. Wind sprints and related high intensity/short duration locomotion compliment strength training very nicely, as does just taking a walk.
Agreed, and I think it's important as we get older to include some form of movement as well as resistance training; whether that's a brisk walk, sprints, or a few runs, just moving will complement resistance training nicely IMO.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I think that adding some running to the "normal activities" permits to vary. Some variety is always good to create carryover between moves.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
While some people enjoy slow running as far as training goes, sprint has so much more bang for the buck. It takes less time, builds muscles and lung power and has more long term benefits. That and the shorter duration does kill your joints as much.
I think that like many training elements, LSD running has it uses. It really all comes back to what one is training for. I would argue that it is almost indispensable for certain goals.
 

Questionfear

Level 5 Valued Member
While some people enjoy slow running as far as training goes, sprint has so much more bang for the buck. It takes less time, builds muscles and lung power and has more long term benefits. That and the shorter duration does kill your joints as much.
I don't disagree. However, much like we tell people to start with S&S, I think you need to start with slow running before you begin sprinting. In my opinion, based solely on the volume I used to do (sometimes 30+ miles per week), I think if you can't run 2-3 miles at an easy pace you should not be sprinting. You need to be able to get in a warmup 1/2 mile or so, then sprint, then have at least 1/4-1/2 mile cooldown...so that right there might be 2 miles of running with some of it very easy and some of it very hard. If you can't comfortably cover the distance at an easy pace, it's not going to be any easier going all-out in bursts. Plus your joints might get less pounding in sprints but they need to be used to the impact first.

Again, just my view as a very average runner.
 

mprevost

Level 6 Valued Member
I don't disagree. However, much like we tell people to start with S&S, I think you need to start with slow running before you begin sprinting. In my opinion, based solely on the volume I used to do (sometimes 30+ miles per week), I think if you can't run 2-3 miles at an easy pace you should not be sprinting. You need to be able to get in a warmup 1/2 mile or so, then sprint, then have at least 1/4-1/2 mile cooldown...so that right there might be 2 miles of running with some of it very easy and some of it very hard. If you can't comfortably cover the distance at an easy pace, it's not going to be any easier going all-out in bursts. Plus your joints might get less pounding in sprints but they need to be used to the impact first.

Again, just my view as a very average runner.
I agree with this. A 20 something might be able to get away with it but a 30 something and especially a 40+ really needs a base level of run fitness before they start sprints. 2-3 miles at an easy pace is really nothing. A person who does not have the fitness to do that is really deconditioned, even at 40+.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Running "slowly" is a tremendous way to get some basic conditioning, without being injured. This kind of running is the most sustainable.

Regardless the age, it is important to run with proper equipment and if possible, on a proper terrain (especially if we have some medical constraints). Plus, slow running has more carryover on everyday life that sprint training.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I went for an hour+ walk today and I feel it! Walking, jogging, running, jumping, skipping - all good stuff!!!
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I really like rucking. This is so natural, with so much carryover.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Smile-n-Nod

Level 5 Valued Member
Light running is described as approx. 5 miles per hour.
That's only 12 min/mile, which is about as fast as I can run while keeping my heartbeat rate in the MAF target zone.

I feel a little better about my über-slow running pace. Thanks!
 
Last edited:

Kettlebelephant

Level 7 Valued Member
I didn't read the article, but saying you shouldn't run is so full of s***.
I get it when someone says "you shouldn't run until you fixed -insert structural or other problem- first", but anything else is BS.
We became the by far most dominant species on the planet for 3 reasons:
1. Our brain and how big and complex it became over time.
2. Opposable thumbs
3. Upright gait and all the things that came with it: sweating to cool down, efficiancy (human gait is the most efficient of all animals, messured in kcal spend), lesser surface area that's exposed to the sun and many more things.
We thrived because we could cover huge distances to search for food (gatherer) or hunt it (look up "persistence hunting").

Telling people to avoid running is telling them to abandon one of the existancial things of being a human!

Yes you should stay away from running when you're a heavyweight powerlifter or otherwise way to heavy for your size, because then it could really produce problems for your joints. Otherwise if you're a healthy individual with a appropriate weight for his/her size and don't have a completely fu... up technique, it's actually good for the joints.
 

Al Ciampa

Level 8 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I didn't read the article, but saying you shouldn't run is so full of s***.
I get it when someone says "you shouldn't run until you fixed -insert structural or other problem- first", but anything else is BS.
We became the by far most dominant species on the planet for 3 reasons:
1. Our brain and how big and complex it became over time.
2. Opposable thumbs
3. Upright gait and all the things that came with it: sweating to cool down, efficiancy (human gait is the most efficient of all animals, messured in kcal spend), lesser surface area that's exposed to the sun and many more things.
We thrived because we could cover huge distances to search for food (gatherer) or hunt it (look up "persistence hunting").

Telling people to avoid running is telling them to abandon one of the existancial things of being a human!

Yes you should stay away from running when you're a heavyweight powerlifter or otherwise way to heavy for your size, because then it could really produce problems for your joints. Otherwise if you're a healthy individual with a appropriate weight for his/her size and don't have a completely fu... up technique, it's actually good for the joints.
To piggyback off of this... running doesn't improve health or increase longevity; "not" running degrades health and decreases longevity. We are migratory and highly aerobic animals living mostly in urban zoos. Our current public health issues are not all too surprising.
 
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)
Top Bottom