Your favourite OS reset(s)?

Nacho

Level 5 Valued Member
Its been 6 months since I found OS resets and I have been doing them every day since.
I haven`t put on any emphasis on any of the resets but rather just roughly spent 2 minutes per reset every day. However, I have kind of realized that diaphragmatic breathing, rocking and head nods seems to work best or the benefits seem the most noticeable at least. (”Releasing” the diaphragm, mobility of thoracic spine and hips and also lower back tightness melting away.)

I also do enjoy rolling and gait pattern movements like crawling/marching etc. but I feel like maybe my near daily turkish get ups (S&S) cover many of the same benefits as rolling has... ? I have also paid a lot of attention to my normal walking = it works as a reset.

So if I spend at least 10 minutes a day doing the resets, maybe I should put my focus on the three that seems to be most beneficial for me. I think I will give it a try at least...

What are your favourite resets and why?
 

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
On off days it is rolling. Very restorative. On working days (desk worker) probably prone neck nods ("tv position").

Rocking used to be my go to reset for about everything but my patella area is pretty tender at the moment and I can't tolerate them well :/

Shoulder pumps (downdog to cobra) are also great and feel like a reset. And I like high knee standing cross crawls between sets of swings to loosen up my lower back.
 

crazycanuck

Level 8 Valued Member
One thing I have been doing lately in warming up (working on getting back to the time standard in Simple) is throwing in OS moves into other moves I find helpful.

Usually get down on floor and do some baby crawling forwards and backwards/axial or side to side, then lay down on belly propped on elbows and do neck nods, then a sort of leading backwards with the eyes/head half roll from propped on elbow to ending up sitting on buttock/outstretched leg and other leg bent/foot on floor (learned from one of Aleks Salkin's challenge workouts), do that back and forth, then back on stomach for tactical frog and thoracic rotations, at the least, downward facing dog and a bit more crawling, or would stand up for goblet squats and do a bit of marching prior. Basically whatever seems to flow nicely together, not preplanned usually.

On days I don't move the 'bells, often do Flexible Steel joint mobility sequence while breakfast cooking, and the very basic wake me up daily reset from the first OS book.
 

Benjamin Renaud

Level 7 Valued Member
The reset I hated the most and did the least often is segmental rolling and it became one of my favorite resets. It's also the one I need the most at the moment.

I used to love rocking the most because it allowed me to slowly overcome pes anserinus (medial knee) tendonitis in both knees. It mainly allowed me to regain full range of motion without too much load, it took a lot more to get full recovery but this was the beginning.

Diaphragmatic breathing took the longest to pay off, but was one of the most crucial one for me. I had pain in my right scalene from not being able to brace properly or actually from not being able to breath when braced because my diaphragm was too weak to push down against my braced midsection. It took months to finally allow me to breath behind the shield without my scalene interfering.

As for crawling I haven't done much in the past 2 years, After doing Louka Kurcer's crawling program part 1 and 2, I got saturated from crawling and didn't feel like I was getting the benefits that were advertised for crawling. It might be because I needed more from other types of exercises for crawling to start paying off again. I'm sure it'll be very different when I do it again.

Now, I do the basic 5 (from the original OS book) almost daily in my warm up for 5 minutes.
 

Hasbro

Level 5 Valued Member
Rolling is my favorite. And doing it on a hardwood floor has done wonders for my back and shoulders. Next favorite is rocking followed by crawling. I feel like crawling is probably more beneficial but rocking just feels so good.
 

Blake Nelson

Level 5 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Oh boy, I love segmental rolling and crawling. Rolling is the one that keeps me feeling fresh. Crawling seems to really be a game-changer for many people I work with, even in small doses. All that said, I think there is a reason each of them is included in the material, and each is valuable in its own way.
Blake Nelson
 

njrick1

Level 5 Valued Member
Lately I've been loving how I feel after Original Strength Performance work, such as skipping, loaded carries with the x in mind, and occasionally sprinting. These are done after unstructured "playing" with the more fundamental resets for 20 minutes or so.
 

njrick1

Level 5 Valued Member
I feel like a bit of an annomoly here. I've experimented with OS resets on occasion but they don't seem to do anything.
I am a huge fan on OS but for me more important than the resets themselves is the principle of moving and playing as much as possible. This could mean resets which would be especially helpful if you are not moving as effectively as you could be, but it could also mean walking, yoga, martial arts, dancing, soccer, basketball etc. Anyone could feel free to disagree with me here.
 

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
I am a huge fan on OS but for me more important than the resets themselves is the principle of moving and playing as much as possible. This could mean resets which would be especially helpful if you are not moving as effectively as you could be, but it could also mean walking, yoga, martial arts, dancing, soccer, basketball etc. Anyone could feel free to disagree with me here.
OS really clicked for me when I read about the three pillars in OS performance: Diaphragmatic breathing, contralateral movement and vestibular stimulation.

Thus, focussing on the X, good breathing and head control, you could make every movement some kind of reset.
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
OS really clicked for me when I read about the three pillars in OS performance: Diaphragmatic breathing, contralateral movement and vestibular stimulation.

Thus, focussing on the X, good breathing and head control, you could make every movement some kind of reset.
A really good point. For example, when doing a Turkish getup concentrate on the relationship and sequencing between your head movement and overall movement with your breathing. Pause during the movement to fix on the sense of balance and structure of the position. Do unloaded getups with your eyes closed. etc.
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
One thing I have been doing lately in warming up (working on getting back to the time standard in Simple) is throwing in OS moves into other moves I find helpful.

Usually get down on floor and do some baby crawling forwards and backwards/axial or side to side, then lay down on belly propped on elbows and do neck nods, then a sort of leading backwards with the eyes/head half roll from propped on elbow to ending up sitting on buttock/outstretched leg and other leg bent/foot on floor (learned from one of Aleks Salkin's challenge workouts), do that back and forth, then back on stomach for tactical frog and thoracic rotations, at the least, downward facing dog and a bit more crawling, or would stand up for goblet squats and do a bit of marching prior. Basically whatever seems to flow nicely together, not preplanned usually.

On days I don't move the 'bells, often do Flexible Steel joint mobility sequence while breakfast cooking, and the very basic wake me up daily reset from the first OS book.
I found that integrating the moves into workout or as breaks throughout the day worked for me. Do rolls between getup reps for example. Rocking between pushups. Head nods every time you go and come back from the computer at work.
 

crazycanuck

Level 8 Valued Member
I found that integrating the moves into workout or as breaks throughout the day worked for me. Do rolls between getup reps for example. Rocking between pushups. Head nods every time you go and come back from the computer at work.

That's right....sometimes you more often need "movement snacks"....not just one big meal.
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
One thing I have been doing lately in warming up (working on getting back to the time standard in Simple) is throwing in OS moves into other moves I find helpful.

Usually get down on floor and do some baby crawling forwards and backwards/axial or side to side, then lay down on belly propped on elbows and do neck nods, then a sort of leading backwards with the eyes/head half roll from propped on elbow to ending up sitting on buttock/outstretched leg and other leg bent/foot on floor (learned from one of Aleks Salkin's challenge workouts), do that back and forth, then back on stomach for tactical frog and thoracic rotations, at the least, downward facing dog and a bit more crawling, or would stand up for goblet squats and do a bit of marching prior. Basically whatever seems to flow nicely together, not preplanned usually.

On days I don't move the 'bells, often do Flexible Steel joint mobility sequence while breakfast cooking, and the very basic wake me up daily reset from the first OS book.
Aleks Salkin recently described hanging as the missing OS link. I am sure Pavel Macek would agree. Passive hanging is gold for the shoulders.
 

the hansenator

Level 6 Valued Member
Aleks Salkin recently described hanging as the missing OS link. I am sure Pavel Macek would agree. Passive hanging is gold for the shoulders.
I like hanging. Works the grip and feels like a great stretch.

I once told my physical therapist I've been hanging from the pullup bar and he said "That's great, keep doing it!"
 
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