all posts post new thread

[THE LATEST ARTICLES] Iron Monkey - Deep Six Challenge

In the first of these two articles, the author writes, "After almost two years of training and preparation, I successfully lifted the Dinnie Stones on July 19th, 2022 in Potarch, Scotland, becoming the 204th person to do so."

Wow!




It’s been a while since there was a good old fashioned “lift heavy a#@ weight” article and I’m here for it!

The unorthodox approach was very interesting to read, very Strongfirst style.
 
Two new articles.

First, a deep dive into the getup that will be especially interesting for those of you who are doing them with heavy weights (or who aspire to do so):



Next, an article that discusses the speed at which you move the weight in your training - some of its conclusions may surprise you!

 
An inspiring story of one man's way of bringing strength training and education together, often at exactly the same time!

 
This is "news you can use" if you squat and relates back to an earlier article about lifting speed.


(The earlier article, in case you missed it, is here: Will You Gain More Strength by Varying Your Lifting Speed? | StrongFirst)
 
This is "news you can use" if you squat and relates back to an earlier article about lifting speed.


(The earlier article, in case you missed it, is here: Will You Gain More Strength by Varying Your Lifting Speed? | StrongFirst)

Great article!
 
This is "news you can use" if you squat and relates back to an earlier article about lifting speed.


(The earlier article, in case you missed it, is here: Will You Gain More Strength by Varying Your Lifting Speed? | StrongFirst)

Great article!
 
Strategy is the plan. Tactics are the action.

Strategy is the why. Tactics are the how.

Read more at:


Join Hector, Pavel, and Fabio for Programming Demystified to dive deep into strategies and tactics.
 
Strategy is the destination, Tactics are the journey
Strategy is the duration, Tactics are the ticking and tocking of the clock

:) I love these analogies, and use simile metaphors in business when presenting Vision, Mission, Goals
 
 
The most recent article

is being discussed here for anyone interested:


-S-
 
Bearing in mind another recent thread I'd add one more thing to consider. Lifestyle -which is included in the article- should consider the effect of occupation. This is obvious for a professional athelete. Similarly, there are many people doing work with a substantial physical component, for example, construction, manufacturing, outdoors and other categories of workers. Occupational physical activity needs to be considered. For example, I recall meeting an employee who slit and poured bags into large funnel all day. This example is from more than a decade ago. Essentially, the job entailed picking up a 20-30kg bag from floor to knee level, doing a loaded bearhug or "goblet" style carry for 1-4 metres, rotating the bag sideways, resting it on a surface while slitting one end with a poorly designed tool, then grasping one end using only fingers of both hands so as to pour the contents in as quickly as possible. Then onto the next bag and pallet. I asked how many pallets a day and calculated total number bags and total volume of weight. I was impressed and a bit envious of the volume, it was thousands of kilograms daily but I would be guessing now. Avoiding injury, allowing recovery, maintaining unused ranges of movement and so on were all relevant to this concrete bag lifter.

This is the reverse situation of the sedentary, inactive worker who has limited range of movement, sarcopenia and so on. And so a different set of considerations applies.

Anyway, this seemed like a good spot to reinforce this consideration. Strongfirst previously makes it in relation to LEOs, military, emergancy personnel - understanding the precise nature of each individuals job to helps to design the most suitable and safe program(s).
 
Want a detailed plan you can follow? Here you go:

@Fabio Zonin, am I missing something or is there an error/omission in the article?

This chart below of Alice's example appears to be repeated twice, but I don't see a generic chart with rep schemes for each RM, which would presumably have rows for each RM between 8 and 12. So from Alice's example, I can see the rep schemes for 8, 9, and 11, but not for 10 or 12.

cruiser-alice-tests-results.jpg
 
@Fabio Zonin, am I missing something or is there an error/omission in the article?

This chart below of Alice's example appears to be repeated twice, but I don't see a generic chart with rep schemes for each RM, which would presumably have rows for each RM between 8 and 12. So from Alice's example, I can see the rep schemes for 8, 9, and 11, but not for 10 or 12.

cruiser-alice-tests-results.jpg
so, if you reverse engineer these numbers it shows, based on her tested RM with the tested weights, in particular for her with these movements, that you execute sets on a light day of about 1/3 of your tested RM. On Medium, you alternate 1/3 and 1/2 of your tested RM and on a heavy day, you rotate sets of 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 of your tested RM.

so on the day scheduled, you'll rotate these set lengths till you reach the prescribed NL for the day, based on the Total NL for the week, which is controlled by the roll of a die.

Just fill in your tested values and break down the sets and reps through the chart provided, and you'll have your own custom version of the workout.

step 1. roll dice for each week's layout.

1695928444786.png

Step 2. map out the sets and reps based on the total volume, and their Set/rep scheme.

1695929359895.png

and as the example given in the article shows, after plugging in your tested Repetition Max numbers, the math will shake out for any number of max reps you tested. so you'll have 12 particular layouts that will occur, in turn, over the weeks. after you test your RM, then you line them up in your schedule as the program outlines. your RM may vary.
 
Last edited:
Back
Top Bottom