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Other/Mixed "Base Fitness" Programming

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
While doing some reading on Rob Shaul's Mountain Tactical Institute I found this article on 'Base Fitness' (or General Physical Preparation) and wanted to share it with the folks here. Personally I find Rob's programming (having used it extensively from 2013-2014) falls heavily into the GPP and SPP 1 continuum with a few of his points falling into the SPP 2 area as well.

Anyway the article is here: 8 "Base Fitness" Programming Fundamentals.

For me this is the highlight of the article:

Keep it simple

Sophisticated design is immature. Stick to the fundamentals. Toss out programming that bounces all over the place or that you don’t understand. Toss out exercises which are too complicated or don’t make your athletes work and breath hard. Discard exercise equipment which is complicated, difficult to use or not readily available. Respect your athletes’ time and deploy proven exercises and training modes inefficient, mission-direct training cycles and training sessions.

As I get older and still train in some challenging activities (BJJ and Muay Thai), I have found simplicity/minimalism to be a godsend.

And this is a 'clew' that great minds think alike when it comes to determining the greats among strength coaches.
 

tomstranger

Level 7 Valued Member
I like some of their stuff and have started incorporating some chassis integrity inspired workouts after learning about them from @paules. I’ve found it beneficial. You’re right though, lots of overlap between some of the trainers I respect.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
I think GPP / S&C minimalism can be a double-edged sword.

I think they're great if you have an active life outside of 'the gym' -- a sport or hobby that involves a lot of movement and is reasonably demanding and stimulative of multiple systems.

Where I see it falling short is when otherwise sedentary people view it as a short cut to doing the bare minimum necessary.

Minimalist GPP / S&C programs might be "all you need" if the rest of your active life is spent mountaineering, hiking, rowing, ballroom dancing, cycling, rolling, etc.

That doesn't mean they're "all you need" if you otherwise mostly sit on your butt.
 

james_1127

Level 5 Valued Member
I think GPP / S&C minimalism can be a double-edged sword.

I think they're great if you have an active life outside of 'the gym' -- a sport or hobby that involves a lot of movement and is reasonably demanding and stimulative of multiple systems.

Where I see it falling short is when otherwise sedentary people view it as a short cut to doing the bare minimum necessary.

Minimalist GPP / S&C programs might be "all you need" if the rest of your active life is spent mountaineering, hiking, rowing, ballroom dancing, cycling, rolling, etc.

That doesn't mean they're "all you need" if you otherwise mostly sit on your butt.
I think the big key is how one defines "minimalism" ... IMO minimalism is simply cutting out the unnecessary

The majority of my programming is surrounded by
Strength based programs
KB clean & presses/bench press, deadlifts/zercher sqt, and upper body pulls

Strong endurance
1H swings or LCCJ

I think the focus on a handful of big exercises that are part of big movements (sqt, hinge, push, pull) is about all 90% of most ppl training need...
 

tomstranger

Level 7 Valued Member
I think GPP / S&C minimalism can be a double-edged sword.

I think they're great if you have an active life outside of 'the gym' -- a sport or hobby that involves a lot of movement and is reasonably demanding and stimulative of multiple systems.

Where I see it falling short is when otherwise sedentary people view it as a short cut to doing the bare minimum necessary.

Minimalist GPP / S&C programs might be "all you need" if the rest of your active life is spent mountaineering, hiking, rowing, ballroom dancing, cycling, rolling, etc.

That doesn't mean they're "all you need" if you otherwise mostly sit on your butt.
YES. I see a real hazard with the way of thinking that “x” is all you need when in fact “x” is meant to supplement a sport, squad PT, etc.
Edit: I’ve noticed that my perception of what I need from my training has changed pretty substantially since changing from more manual labor based work with lots of walking, to police academy and OTJ training. I’m significantly less active at work, and so I’ve been making an effort to walk as well as training more, and with greater frequency.
The other change has been that I’m trying to pack on a little weight due to the nature of the job making it advantageous to be a bit bulkier, within reason.
 
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watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
I think the focus on a handful of big exercises that are part of big movements (sqt, hinge, push, pull) is about all 90% of most ppl training need...

If that's the only substantial activity they do, and we're optimizing for health and longevity, I can't agree.

I've known plenty of guys in the iron game over the decades who only lifted (and lifted big) and had awful health.

Built like refrigerators, could move a ton of weight, but get winded walking up 2 flights of stairs.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
I think GPP / S&C minimalism can be a double-edged sword.

I think they're great if you have an active life outside of 'the gym' -- a sport or hobby that involves a lot of movement and is reasonably demanding and stimulative of multiple systems.

Where I see it falling short is when otherwise sedentary people view it as a short cut to doing the bare minimum necessary.

Minimalist GPP / S&C programs might be "all you need" if the rest of your active life is spent mountaineering, hiking, rowing, ballroom dancing, cycling, rolling, etc.

That doesn't mean they're "all you need" if you otherwise mostly sit on your butt.
Noted here, @watchnerd. In my own case given Brazilian Jiujitsu and Muay Thai are lifestyles I pursue, I require minimalist S&C so I don't cut into scarce recovery time. Now, if I ever get more sedentary that means I'd add more stuff to my S&C.
 

james_1127

Level 5 Valued Member
If that's the only substantial activity they do, and we're optimizing for health and longevity, I can't agree.

I've known plenty of guys in the iron game over the decades who only lifted (and lifted big) and had awful health.

Built like refrigerators, could move a ton of weight, but get winded walking up 2 flights of stairs.
The weight and body composition of individuals is predicated on diet not training...

Hit 8-10k steps a day outside
Portion control your food
Push, pull, hinge, squat

Its not more complicated than that IMO
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
I think GPP / S&C minimalism can be a double-edged sword.

I think they're great if you have an active life outside of 'the gym' -- a sport or hobby that involves a lot of movement and is reasonably demanding and stimulative of multiple systems.

Where I see it falling short is when otherwise sedentary people view it as a short cut to doing the bare minimum necessary.

Minimalist GPP / S&C programs might be "all you need" if the rest of your active life is spent mountaineering, hiking, rowing, ballroom dancing, cycling, rolling, etc.

That doesn't mean they're "all you need" if you otherwise mostly sit on your butt.
If you look at what MTI considers GPP programming, you aren’t going to see any big gaps common to some minimalist programming.

If anything, their idea of “simple” is a little more nuanced than mine.
 

james_1127

Level 5 Valued Member
You just made my point.

Those 8-10k steps right there aren't squat, hinge, etc.
I listed fitness in 3 easy things lol... How much more "minimal" can you go? Most ppl way over complicate things, I think that's why I agree with a minimalist pov on S&C for gen pop

I've spent the last 2yrs of training (2020 & 2021) doing heavy 1H swings twice a week, & 2 days a week of ruck marching

This year I wanted to get back to more strength training so I've spent easily 75% of my training doing KB c&p, deadlifts or zercher sqt, and an upper body pulls and just simply walk for 40min every morning... Most mainstream fitness ppl's heads would explode
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
I listed fitness in 3 easy things lol... How much more "minimal" can you go?

Apparently minimal enough that they're sitting on their butts when not lifting.

Hence why I wrote:

"That doesn't mean they're "all you need" if you otherwise mostly sit on your butt."
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
I like some of their stuff and have started incorporating some chassis integrity inspired workouts after learning about them from @paules. I’ve found it beneficial. You’re right though, lots of overlap between some of the trainers I respect.
I think Turkish Getups and Full Contact Twists cover a LOT of the chassis integrity piece.
 
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