Other/Mixed books for self development

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)
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wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Hoping I can get some recommendations for books! I am not really looking for books in the exercise field, as I'm sure we can all post numerous sources for those, but more books that help promote self development and personal growth. I'm an avid reader and always looking to improve, and would love to hear some examples to look into.

Three books that I have currently on the way are "Mindset" by Carol Dweck, "Start with Why" by Simon Sinek, and "The Art of Learning" by Josh Waitzkin (especially excited for this one - I've really gotten into chess in the last few months, love the strategy and concepts within it).

Other titles I've read that may help in terms of what I'm looking for

Mastery - Robert Greene (also love his others, 48 Laws of Power and 33 Strategies of War)
The Talent Code - Daniel Coyle
many of Malcolm Gladwell's titles
Antifragile - Nassim Taleb (had to laugh when I saw this quoted in S&S!)

As well as some more historical books, such as the Art of War by Sun-Tzu, The Prince by Machiavelli, Letters from a Stoic by Seneca, etc.

post away!
 

MattM

SFG1
Certified Instructor
48 laws is one of my favorites.

Just learned of a book called extreme ownership. A leadership book written by 2 navy seals. Very interested in that.
 

kodo kb

Level 6 Valued Member
Check out How To Live on 24 Hours a Day by Arnold Bennett. It's out of copyright so you can get it for free. It's a quick and enjoyable read, has a lot of good advice, and is motivational in a very different sense than a lot of other self-development books.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@wespom9, although it's not an answer to your question, and if you'll forgive a touchy-feely-sounding answer, meditate.

-S-
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
These titles sound interesting, definitely something to look into! thanks, keep them coming

@Steve Freides meditation is something I have somewhat tried, but not committed fully to. One of the ways I try to incorporate brief meditation is part of my morning routine, where I wake up, shower/shave and do a short meditation then my OS before making a coffee and reading the paper. What I have recently started since mid-January is I have taken up shotokan karate and am enjoying it immensely. I had tried some yoga in the past but found that it just wasn't for me and while karate has that mind/body connection, tradition and movement aspects I appreciate and am much more willing to stick with and enjoy
 

JamesO

Level 4 Valued Member
As far as books go, The Cloud of Unknowing is a classic. And as far as quick reading goes, you may enjoy my friend, Chris Erdman's, blog. Chris was my pastor for a decade and a half, a friend, father figure, and mentor. His focus is on spiritual formation, which is what he taught at the local seminary. He calls it, "learning to live south of the neck," learning to embody life with, "the whole of our being," rather than just our mind. If spirituality is an interest, I believe these two may be of interest.

However, I agree with Steve. I love reading, but I think the path to wisdom has to be experienced as much as learned. Headspace is a very cool app. It was bloody fantastic at helping me begin exploring meditation five years ago. Check it out!
 

Mach Won

Level 2 Valued Member
This is a bit of an unorthodox suggestion, but I would highly recommend Thinking, Fast and Slow. The book essentially breaks down, in great detail, how you think and why you make many cognitive errors in the process. I've really tried to absorb what this book has to say. I wish more people would consider the idea that the way they arrive at their conclusions may be fundamentally flawed; we'd probably better off as a society.
 

TravisDirks

Level 3 Valued Member
A call for books! Woot!

The best new book I've read in a very long time is actually "Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality". It is hilarious and will give you a serious education in common failure in thought. Really give this one a try: https://cdn.rawgit.com/rjl20/hpmor/0c10d2e8b6bd68e88fd2fc6e6b233140917e7314/out/hpmor.pdf

If you liked Seneca, Check out Epictetus's Enchiridion. For me Seneca's advice is best when times are good. Marcus Aurelius for day to day nose to the grind stone, but Epictetus is where you go when the s**t hits the fan.

If you dig antifragile and have a math background you might check out Taleb's unpublished "Silent Risk": SilentRisk.pdf

The First Tycoon is a really great bio of Vanderbuilt. It paints a really fascinating picture of the time period.
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
This is a bit of an unorthodox suggestion, but I would highly recommend Thinking, Fast and Slow. The book essentially breaks down, in great detail, how you think and why you make many cognitive errors in the process. I've really tried to absorb what this book has to say. I wish more people would consider the idea that the way they arrive at their conclusions may be fundamentally flawed; we'd probably better off as a society.

I've actually read this one! Found it extremely fascinating, you're right. I actually got it because I believe in Antifragile Taleb mentions Kahneman quite a bit and it was easy to tell he thought quite highly of his work. I have to agree

A call for books! Woot!

The best new book I've read in a very long time is actually "Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality". It is hilarious and will give you a serious education in common failure in thought. Really give this one a try: https://cdn.rawgit.com/rjl20/hpmor/0c10d2e8b6bd68e88fd2fc6e6b233140917e7314/out/hpmor.pdf

If you liked Seneca, Check out Epictetus's Enchiridion. For me Seneca's advice is best when times are good. Marcus Aurelius for day to day nose to the grind stone, but Epictetus is where you go when the s**t hits the fan.

If you dig antifragile and have a math background you might check out Taleb's unpublished "Silent Risk": SilentRisk.pdf

The First Tycoon is a really great bio of Vanderbuilt. It paints a really fascinating picture of the time period.

I will have to look into all these, thanks for the recommendations!
 

apa

Level 6 Valued Member
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
The Hero With a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell

and two for motivation:
Born To Run by Christopher McDougal
Spartan Up! by Joe De Sena

BONUS:

Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I read the Count of Monte Cristo a few years back...I have to say - enjoyed it, but some parts were excruciatingly slow and monotonous and almost made me put the book down. I can't say why - maybe the writing style, which can be tedious to read at times, but overall I did like it. I've gotten into classic literature of late, just read Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky and would highly recommend it. Great suggestion!

Born to Run has been recommended to me numerous times; I think its a sign haha
 
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