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Kettlebell C+p & squat

HUNTER1313

Level 6 Valued Member
After reading Pavels last article talking about the Russian ten rep sets for muscle I thought let's just see what it's like. My Gods. I did ten reps of c+p followed with ten reps of double kg squat. It sucks. I didn't get too many sets done and I kept dropping squat reps as I was toast. If I attempt it again I'll try a set of c&p, rest, a set of squats, rest, etc.
 

Andi-in-BKK

Level 4 Valued Member
After reading Pavels last article talking about the Russian ten rep sets for muscle I thought let's just see what it's like. My Gods. I did ten reps of c+p followed with ten reps of double kg squat. It sucks. I didn't get too many sets done and I kept dropping squat reps as I was toast. If I attempt it again I'll try a set of c&p, rest, a set of squats, rest, etc.
What size bells are you using?

I tried doing Clean and Press then squats with double 28s yesterday for sets of 3, I had to call it with the squats after the 7th or 8th set because I was feeling fried. I also tried it with 30sec iso-holds instead of squats at the end of my sets, that was rough also.
 

HUNTER1313

Level 6 Valued Member
Make the timeless weekly template used by Soviet strength athletes work for you.

Train a lift—be it the kettlebell military press, the barbell deadlift, the weighted pullup, or any other strength exercise—three times a week.

If you go with the usual Monday, Wednesday, and Friday schedule, make Wednesday your heavy day. Contrary to the popular belief, you are not at your strongest on Monday, when you got the most rest after the weekend. Half a century ago Soviet experiments determined that you may be rested, but rusty. Make Monday your light day, and on Wednesday your weights will fly. Then Friday is the perfect day to crank up the volume and build muscle.

There you have it:​
Monday—low to medium volume, low to medium intensity
Wednesday—low to medium volume, medium to high intensity
Friday—high volume, low to medium intensity​
To make sure we are on the same page, in the Russian nomenclature, the “intensity” refers to the percentage of your 1RM, not to the proximity to muscle failure or the accompanying drama.

To give you an example, an athlete is training double kettlebell front squats. He can do a strong double with a pair of 40kg kettlebells and twelve reps with a pair of 32s: 2*40kg x 2RM and 2*32kg x 12RM. He does not know and does not want to find out how many reps he can do with the 24s.

His week of squats might look like this:​
Monday—2*24kg x 5, 2*32kg x 4, 5, 6 (NL 20)​
“NL” means the “number of lifts” and refers to the total volume.

20 reps qualifies as “medium” volume, according to the Plan Strong™ guidelines, which are based on the best Soviet practices.​
Wednesday—2*24kg x 3/2, 2*32kg x 3/2, 32+40kg x 2/5, 2*32kg x 4/2 (NL 30)​
“x 3/2” means the weight was lifted for two sets of three reps. In the Russian system the reps are listed first.

“32+40kg” is exactly what it looks like, an asymmetric load. Harder than 2*32kg but easier than 2*40kg. There are at least two good reasons to train with two kettlebells of different weights. First, you get an additional poundage choice without having to buy more bells. Second, by insisting on moving symmetrically, you get the benefits of unilateral training.​
Friday—2*24kg x 4, 5, 6; (2*32kg x 4, 5, 6) x 2; 2*24kg x 10 (NL 55)​
55 reps are considered to be “high” volume.

Ladders like “4, 5, 6” are a common tactic in Russian programming.

Sets of ten with very light weights—nowhere near the 10RM—is a classic Soviet weightlifting tactic for putting on muscle without getting sore.

The entire week totals 105 reps.

The next week might look like this:​
Monday—2*24kg x 3/2, 2*32kg x 3/3 (NL 15)
Wednesday—2*24kg x 3/2, (2*32kg x 2, 2*40kg x 1) x 5 (NL 21)
Friday—2*24kg x 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 10 (NL 40)​
The second week totals 76 reps, a 28% drop from the first. This complies with the Plan Strong™ “Delta 20 Principle,” according to which the volume must go up or down by at least 20% from the previous month, week, day, etc.​
 

HUNTER1313

Level 6 Valued Member
How much of a difference would it make doing ten sets of five opposed to say five sets of ten? It's the same volume and you could work up to tens reps. Or just keep on with sets of ten reps and work on increasing sets. The article never really says how many sets to aim for. The Germans had ten sets of ten.
 

Coyotl

Level 6 Valued Member
How much of a difference would it make doing ten sets of five opposed to say five sets of ten? It's the same volume and you could work up to tens reps. Or just keep on with sets of ten reps and work on increasing sets. The article never really says how many sets to aim for. The Germans had ten sets of ten.
Ahhh GVT... No thanks! I can't answer your "how much" too well, mostly because I don't know how the Soviets did it. If I were to do this, I would want to do 60-120 reps per week spread out over 2-3 sessions. If I were to do a HLM it could be something like M - 2x10, W - 3x10, and F - 1x10 to start and then adding sets as necessary. If the goal is light sets of 10, and you're having issues hitting that, you may need lighter weights.

There IS a difference between 5x10 and 10x5, and if the goal is winning that hyper trophy, 10x5 will not deliver the same results with the same weight. I italicized that last part because I think if you were to do 10x5 with a heavier weight (which you could) and kept rest periods south of 90s (which you could) you might be able to hit a similar stimulus.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 6 Valued Member
If you go with the usual Monday, Wednesday, and Friday schedule, make Wednesday your heavy day. Contrary to the popular belief, you are not at your strongest on Monday, when you got the most rest after the weekend
Research Data

Please provide the research reference on this.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 6 Valued Member
How much of a difference would it make doing ten sets of five opposed to say five sets of ten?
10 Set of 5 Repetition

This fall into the category of Limits Strength Training.

5 Set of 10 Repetition

This fall into the category of Hypertrophy/Bodybuilding Training.

The Germans had ten sets of ten.

German Volume Training

The 10 Sets of 10 Repetition German Volume Training is Hypertrophy Training.

Rest Periods

Rest Periods are between sets are usually around 60 seconds for Upper Body and 90 second for Lower Body Movements.

Lactate

Shorter Rest Periods between set increase Lactate in the muscles.

The larger the number or repetition in a set and the shorter the rest period between sets, the greater the increase of Lactate in the muscles.

Thus, high repetition movement in a exercise and shorter rest periods provide an "Occlusion Training Effect"; aka The Pump or The Burn.

The downstream effect of Lactate triggers an anabolic, muscle building effect...

Practical Occlusion Training
May 2009
Dr. Jeremy P Loenneke, Southeast Missouri State University

The "Accumulation of Metabolites (lactic acid > acidic environment > GH secretion)"

Occlusion training with low intensities has shown increases in lactate and growth
hormone (GH). The increase in GH has actually been shown to be even higher than that
seen with heavy resistance training.
One study in athletes showed a 290x increase in GH
over baseline
(Takarada, Nakamura, Aruga, Onda, Miyazaki, & Ishii, 2000). Lactate
increasing is linked to GH, in that an increase in lactate makes the environment within the
muscle more acidic.
Remember, there is an inverse relationship between lactate and pH, so
as lactate increases, pH decreases. There is evidence to indicate that a low pH stimulates.

The Downside of Hypertrophy Training

The downside of Hypertrophy Training is that muscle mass is increased at the expense of Maximum Strength, Power and Speed; if a Hypertrophy Training Block is performed.
 
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