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Other/Mixed CNS issues, Cortisol ect

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

jozko

Level 5 Valued Member
I think he's actually lifting weights not weightlifting.

JK.

Not really. ;)

Signed:

Your friendly neighborhood weightlifter. ;)
So glad I live in Slovakia. We do have separate term for Oly weightlifting ("vzpieranie") and for lifting weights ("posilňovanie"). Then there is powerlifting ("silový trojboj" - "strength three-fight"). And people do not understand the difference anyway :D
Now, when you know all important vocabulary, you can move here :D
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
So glad I live in Slovakia. We do have separate term for Oly weightlifting ("vzpieranie") and for lifting weights ("posilňovanie"). Then there is powerlifting ("silový trojboj" - "strength three-fight"). And people do not understand the difference anyway :D
Now, when you know all important vocabulary, you can move here :D

In Spanish Olympic weightlifting is "halterofilia", which literally translates as "love of the barbell" --- I think it's confusing and goofy in most languages. ;)
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
Pretty hard to periodize a hybrid workout that has alot of calithstenics and weightlifting.....I have not seen anyone that does that really
Periodized Hybrid Training

There are multipe approaches to this. It is done all the time.

One method is to designate one type of training for one specific day in the week.

1) Monday: Hyperophy Training

2) Wednesday: Calisthenic Exercises

etc.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
Pretty hard to periodize a hybrid workout that has alot of calithstenics and weightlifting.....I have not seen anyone that does that really
"Unfortunately, certain bodyweight gurus fail to recognize and apply important concepts such as gradual progression, restoration, and the cycling of workout intensity through various forms of periodization. Rather than conforming to these principles through bodyweight exercise, science is frowned on, often with condescending comments. These comments are nothing more than a cop out for failing to understand the complexities of modern research."

- Ross Enamait, "Never Gymless," 2006
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
Pretty hard to periodize a hybrid workout that has alot of calithstenics and weightlifting.....I have not seen anyone that does that really
The problem is so many people decide the tool first and then build the program around it, which is great for marketing purposes.

But there are quite a few good programs that combine bodyweight and weights.

Dan John's program here is a great example

Tactical Barbell's programs rely heavily on pullups and easily plug in bodyweight strength exercises. I did a couple cycles of Operator with one arm pushups in place of my press and it worked great.

The SF articles have a ton of great ideas. For example this program: A 6-Week Program to Master the OA/OAOL Push-up | StrongFirst
It gives you your push. Now just add in your pull, hinge, squat and you have a mixed implement program. So you can do that program with deadlifts and goblet squats. You now have a hybrid program that uses barbell, kettlebells, and bodyweight that is well thought out.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
I dont want to screw up my CNS...

I wouldn't worry about your CNS. It can take care of itself.

But you may get better results if you back off a bit, which your body seems to be telling you to do.

Have you tried dong sessions that are less than what you are capable of? Leave some reps in the tank... leave feeling better than when you started..."recharged", not "worked out".... leave feeling that you could repeat that session again exactly if you had to? It can be addictive... And it's just as valid a training session as when you go all out -- if not more so. A lot of these will build your strength and capability while leaving room for quality recovery as well as other pursuits.
 

Abishai

Level 5 Valued Member
I wouldn't worry about your CNS. It can take care of itself.

But you may get better results if you back off a bit, which your body seems to be telling you to do.

Have you tried dong sessions that are less than what you are capable of? Leave some reps in the tank... leave feeling better than when you started..."recharged", not "worked out".... leave feeling that you could repeat that session again exactly if you had to? It can be addictive... And it's just as valid a training session as when you go all out -- if not more so. A lot of these will build your strength and capability while leaving room for quality recovery as well as other pursuits.
How do i know that i wont do too little
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
How do i know that i wont do too little
If you're not making any progress in the things you are training, then it might be too little.

If you are making progress, it is enough.

There is a sweet spot that varies by individual, and varies according to what all is going on in your life. It's a good thing to know how to find. Some people never push hard enough to find it. Others (likely you are one) never back off enough to find it.
 

Manuel Fortin

Level 6 Valued Member
In Spanish Olympic weightlifting is "halterofilia", which literally translates as "love of the barbell" --- I think it's confusing and goofy in most languages. ;)
Well, in French we have haltérophilie, which similar Spanish, but powerlifting is dynamophilie, which means "love of power, strength or force". What I like the most is the term for deadlift: "soulevé de terre", which means lift from the ground. Pretty descriptive.
 

jozko

Level 5 Valued Member
Well, in French we have haltérophilie, which similar Spanish, but powerlifting is dynamophilie, which means "love of power, strength or force". What I like the most is the term for deadlift: "soulevé de terre", which means lift from the ground. Pretty descriptive.
And now I can say I am a true polyglot. Thanks, gentlemen!
 

Chris Hall

Level 4 Valued Member
There is a sweet spot that varies by individual, and varies according to what all is going on in your life. It's a good thing to know how to find. Some people never push hard enough to find it. Others (likely you are one) never back off enough to find it.
I have thought for a long time that most people suffer from one of these two problems when it comes to training.

I suspect that lots of people on this forum have found the sweet spot, and that those who haven’t are far more likely to be in the ‘need to back off‘ category.
 

Chris Hall

Level 4 Valued Member
Volume
Intensity
Frequency

You can go hard with any two:

Eg power to the people gets away with high intensity and high frequency by having very low volume. ‘The Bear‘ gets away with high intensity and high volume by using very low frequency (twice per week- the program says something along the lines of ‘if you are able to do it more than twice a week you didn’t go hard enough)

OR you can keep all of them at moderate levels

OR mix and match - as in programs with easy, medium hard days.

OR you can ramp them all up in the short term to overreach and then back right off.

Something has to give. Just don’t try to push all aspects of training all the time.
 
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LukeV

Level 6 Valued Member
When I was a younger man I found myself always doing high frequency high volume Schwarzenegger- style programs while pretending to myself that my goals were to build muscle and get stronger. When I finally had “what alcoholics call a moment of clarity” I realised my goals had been to go to the gym a lot and feel tired. Unfortunately the clarity came too late to avoid chronic injuries from over-training, in particular repeated training to failure (squat ‘til you puke type stuff). The kind of training you might get away with lifting three days per week but will stuff you if you’re lifting six (without the benefit of PEDs). I was training beyond the ability of my body to recover which lead to overuse injuries in joints and tendons and injuries from poor form and exercise selection. As I say I wanted to go to the gym a lot but I didn’t stop to think that meant I had to lift less each time than if I wanted to go to the gym a little.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
I realised my goals had been to go to the gym a lot and feel tired.
+1 here. The old "you're not getting better unless it's always hard AF" mentality..... It does not work.
repeated training to failure (squat ‘til you puke type stuff). The kind of training you might get away with lifting three days per week but will stuff you if you’re lifting six (without the benefit of PEDs).
Also +1, big time. I would add that even at three days a week you might end up with injuries. Three days a week, to "failure" might be doable for a couple weeks....but I personally wouldn't do it past that.

It's an interesting thing; if you go to 100% one day, are you really training at the same level of "100%" the next session? I mean, maybe if it's a full week after, but in the same week, I would think that it's impossible to actually max out one day, and then repeat that level of strength/intensity/whatever even two days later. If you did, then I would say you didn't actually max out the first day.

I write that to hopefully make the point that I think a lot of people overestimate their recovery ability. Paraphrasing something I saw from Gymnastic Bodies a while back, "you can always do more tomorrow, but you can't undo what you do today."
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
I write that to hopefully make the point that I think a lot of people overestimate their recovery ability. Paraphrasing something I saw from Gymnastic Bodies a while back, "you can always do more tomorrow, but you can't undo what you do today."

The other side of this observation is that most people overestimate the amount of work needed to trigger whatever adaptive response is needed. This is why good programs are wavy, autoregulating, or relatively short duration if intensity of effort is high.
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
The kind of training you might get away with lifting three days per week but will stuff you if you’re lifting six (without the benefit of PEDs).

Interestingly, I usually ramp up my 2 hypertrophy meso cycles from 3, to 3.5, to 4 days a week so that by the end of it I'm conditioned to doing high volume / moderate intensity 4 days a week.

That way when I flip over to a typical 4 day a week weightlifting program, with increasing intensity as I ramp up to competition, it doesn't crush me.

But I can't run that way year round.

And I never do 6 days. Although I might try if I was retired.
 
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