Deadliest specialty bar for training

william bad butt

More than 300 posts
I am a not a competitive powerlifter but I have been training the big 3 lifts the last year. I use the burgener-rippetoe barbell. I really like this bar and it is great. It is a pretty stiff, General all purpose, bar. I was curious about a deadlift specialty bar, I never used one. Reading online, it sounds like it flexes more and allows lifter to use more weight. Are there any advantages of using this type of bar for strength purposes during normal training, even if I don't compete? If you have used this type of bar in your training let me know. Or would this bar be kind of like doing slightly elevated rack pulls?

If it matters, I use a conventional stance and lift in the mid 400s.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
William, a specialty bar isn't necessary for most people. Even if you compete, you'll still get used to it by going to a few competitions - but there's nothing wrong with it, either. I use an Okie deadlift bar, purchased from Rickey Dale Crain, and used by at least one major powerlifting federation in their competitions. I like it - the knurling is sharper, the diameter slightly smaller, and I wanted to get used to those things in training, and it's not terribly expensive, either. I keep one corner of my basement just for deadlifts and that's where this bar sits.

A DL bar will bend more because it allows you to be a little closer to upright before the plates actually move off the ground, but it can't be too bendy otherwise it would cause the weights to bounce at the ends. For my deadlifts, which are around 300 lbs., I don't think the difference is even noticeable, but for someone pulling heavier, the difference would be greater.

-S-
 

Bill Been

More than 500 posts
Continue on with your B&R bar (like mine), content in knowing you're working through the entire effective range of motion.
 

Geoff Chafe

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I have an Eleiko Olympic bar I have had for along time. It was over $1000 dollars at the time. They are more expensive now. A speciality bar is not necessary though. It has a lot of "whip" and very aggressive knurling for weightlifting, but I would never use it in a power rack or conventional deadlift with it. I haven't used it in over a year as I have been doing very little weightlifting since focusing on kettlebell and strength training. I have a cheap very stiff bar for that. If you take care of your bar and oil the bearings occasionally it will last you forever.

I have a new 48mm axel bar I use it for everything lately. I really like the challenge. I had to deload due to the grip challenge, but I am progressing well.

A power bar is very stiff for more power transfer into the bar. You do not want a whippy bar for Powerlifting movements.

@william bad butt The Bergner-Rippetoe bar is an Olympic bar isn't it?
 

william bad butt

More than 300 posts
It's a hybrid bar, with markings for both power lifting and olympic lifting. It is a fairly rigid bar. I really like it and it is the best one I've ever used for me (compared to texas power bar which was nice and the cheap york bar). It is not too expensive either. Although if I was really into the Olympic lifts I would probably get another bar (whippier). I lean more towards powerlifting style.

I've always wanted a fat bar. I've settled on fat gripz and fat gripz extreme. They have really taken my grip to a new level. Maybe even more so than heavy kettlebells have.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
I've always wanted a fat bar. I've settled on fat gripz and fat gripz extreme. They have really taken my grip to a new level. Maybe even more so than heavy kettlebells have.
I bought the IronMind Apollon's Axle - very pleased with that. It's 2" and also non-rotating. I like to warmup for regular deadlift by doing straddle deadlifts with it.

-S-
 
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