Keeping wrist straight

Eabmoto

Level 1 Valued Member
I know correct form is having my wrist straight when the kettle bell is in racked position or over head but it is really painful having the weight on my forearm/wrist when my wrist is straight. This is not from the bell slamming into position. I’m using a cheap kettlebell with, what seems to me, a relatively small handle and I’m wondering if the kettlebell hung lower on my arm it wouldn’t hurt. Or, is this just something I need to get used to? Thanks for any info
 

Papa Georgio

Level 5 Valued Member
Keeping wrists straight is not negotiable. You can definitely hurt your wrists and even your elbows by letting the bell bend your wrist back.

Unfortunately, this can be bell specific. Sometimes, the smaller bells are the biggest offenders. I have a 20kg bell that lays right on the tip of my ulna bone. The most uncomfortable bell I have is a rogue 40kg bell. If I do too many TGU's with it, I'll get a big blister-like sore on my arm where it sits. The rogue 44kg & 48kg bells have a longer handle and don't bother my arm.

I've never used them, but they sell wrist/arm guards for kettlebell use. Whenever I get sores on my arms, I just tape some gauze over those spots for kettlebell practice, and it helps a little. It can suck a little, but you just get used to it. Good Luck!
 

Eabmoto

Level 1 Valued Member
Thanks for the reply. It helps to know I’m on the right track to solve my problem. I definitely need to find a brand of kettlebell that is more comfortable.
 

crazycanuck

Level 8 Valued Member
I have a 16kg that was uncomfortable at first, when moving from 12 to 16kg getups, for this very reason @Papa Georgio describes...different size of bell and sits different on the wrist....the vertical space between the top of the bell and the underside of the handle is different, plus a different brand.

I found using a pair of thick winter socks over my wrist helped (cut a length that works for you from the leg part, not foot portion) . I don't have to use the socks now. Also, for me grabbing the bell more closer to the horn/outer side vs straight in the middle seems to place it more on the radial side of the arm once I roll over with the bell and works for me.
 

Eabmoto

Level 1 Valued Member
My 16kg Bell rests in an ok position, on my forearm and with a wrist band, it’s fine. The 24kg actually sits right on my wrist. It doesn’t seem right at all.
 

Kotton

Level 1 Valued Member
My 20kg hurt the back of my forearm badly. I've tried setting it down on something up high the same height as the rack position so I can easily grip it and set it in the correct position, with a straight wrist it's just really painful just resting there. I've only got slender wrists.
I'm not trying to impress anyone with the ability of my forearms to absorb pain, I'm focused on the correct technique. So I got a pair of the smallest kids shin guards I could find and use sweat bands to hold them in place on my arm. The guards are quite thin so they don't put the kettlebell in a wierd position.
If I didn't do this I'd have to use very light bells.
In time as my technique improves and my wrists get used to it I may not need anything. But for now it works and I can do my double clean and press and squats.
 

Kotton

Level 1 Valued Member
I might also mention that I'm not using a competition kettlebell as I don't have access to one at the moment. Perhaps the one I have, because it's smaller is putting the weight higher up on the back of my forearm, about 3 inches from my hand and because it's smaller, the pressure isn't spread out as much?
 

barrak

Level 5 Valued Member
I just checked my Kettlebellsusa 20K Metrixx Elite and it rests 2 inches below my wrist bone when racked with a straight wrist. In comparison, their competition bell rests half an inch closer to the wrist bone.

I much prefer the Metrixx Elite for this reason.

I have a large hand but a bony forearm, so I still use wrist guards for extra protection and stability of bell against the forearm.
 

patterner

Level 5 Valued Member
Brand can also play a large part. I had a similar issue with my Apollo 24, I switched brands to one from cff-fit, and I haven't had the issue since.
 

Kotton

Level 1 Valued Member
I'll have to try some different brands. But with Covid-19 forcing all the gyms to close there's no stock of kettlebells anywhere at the moment.
 

Keep Lifting

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Please post a photo of yourself holding the bell. The key to comfort is goosenecking a bit. This keeps your wrist in a position of strength, helps you to control the bell and should help to take the pressure off of your arm.
 

Kotton

Level 1 Valued Member
Just a quick update. There's no physical way I can gooseneck my 20kg's. The space between the handle and the bell is not big enough. I have a 32kg that is too heavy for me to clean but if I sit it on a high bench, squat down so it's shoulder high and grip it correctly, I can stand with it racked quite easily. It rests lower on the meaty part of my forearm with little pain as opposed to the 20's that sit higher towards my hands on the bony part and hurt like s***!
This is what I have Team Kettlebell (4kg-36kg) - Strength Equipment | Again Faster Australia
 

Boris Bachmann

Level 6 Valued Member
General snobbery about brands has, for the most part, gone away, but a bad kettlebell is a bad kettlebell. If there's not enough clearance between the handle and the bell, technique and strength can only do so much. Thickness and smoothness of the handle are also potential common issues.

Competition bells are nice, and should probably be more consistent in size and construction, but occasionally you can see issues with them.
 

Eabmoto

Level 1 Valued Member
I meant competition bells on my previous post... not completion. I’ll just have to try different bells to find what works the best.
 
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