"Owning the weight" in barbells, size of increments

guardian7

More than 500 posts
If you are referring "the program" as PTTP, I've understood that you always drop 10% for the second set. This way you can go to bigger weights in a single wave. Dont wait to get two sets on same weight.

If you bench five times a week you probably don't need more sets. If not so often, you can do some more back off sets, depending on what is the volume you're used to do. But always do warm up sets.

You can keep the same weight for 2-3 workouts, depending on how often you bench. Don't stay in same weight too long or you'll stall, in my opinion. If you can't make 5 reps, just go back down (a bit higher than what you started with) and start over, some easier workout is earned. I'd try to get roughly 20% of max increase in the first wave, so start low enough.

If your heaviest weight doesn't improve in reps, it's time to do something else. My feeling was that too small increments (when compared to max) can make you stay in a rather heavy intensity for too long, and lead to overload.
Wouldn/t it be common for less experienced but not total young beginner lifters to have a cycle that starts briefly pure linear, then goes to repeated step then the close to bodyweight three steps? This would seem optimal wouldn't it? The factor would be how close to a multiple of bodyweight you are and how you feel that day.

High frequency four-five times a week PTTP template assumed. Two sets. Second set is 5-10KG less. Example:

In KG.
50/55/65/65/
70/70/75/75/
80/80/80/ the third step is repeated here because the lifter just doesn't feel 85 happening yet. Not programmed.
85 fail
backoff 75/ rebuild 80/80/85 PR stop cycle.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
While following PttP, I like 10% jumps between sessions and just 5% between cycles.

50/60/70/80
60/70/80/90

55/65/75/85
65/75/85/95

60/70/80/90
70/80/90/100(PR)

#################

55/65/75/85
65/75/85/95

60/70/80/90
70/80/90/100(old PR)

65/75/85/90
75/85/95/105(new PR)
So, in this programming, we would assume the previous PR was 95. Otherwise, the lifter could not tolerate the ten pound jumps each session, especially bench.
 

Alan Mackey

More than 300 posts
So, in this programming, we would assume the previous PR was 95. Otherwise, the lifter could not tolerate the ten pound jumps each session, especially bench.
A PR in this context just means something a tad better than the last one, not a lifetime achievement.

The program starts at doing five reps with your 10RM (roughly), which should be fairly easy. At the completion of your first cycle, the projected PR may be WAY lower than a true 5RM PR. And that's okay.

You are not trying to grind reps, you are increasing your base strength instead your peak strength. You should finish your sessions feeling so fresh that you could repeat it on the spot no problem. And, maybe, once every few months, you test your maxes.
 

Timo Keskitalo

Triple-Digit Post Count
In KG.
50/55/65/65/
70/70/75/75/
80/80/80/ the third step is repeated here because the lifter just doesn't feel 85 happening yet. Not programmed.
85 fail
backoff 75/ rebuild 80/80/85 PR stop cycle.
My opinion is that that will lead to overload. Instead I would do something like:

60/60/65/70
70/75/80/80
3x85/65/65/70
75/75/80/85
/85/4x90/70/70 and so on. And then if you stop again at 4x90 it's time to change.

The 3x is that if you supposedly didn't get 5. If you do get 5 just continue until you don't. One PR is not a reason to stop.
 

Timo Keskitalo

Triple-Digit Post Count
If You did 5x90/4x90 you would start another cycle of course.
My opinion is that that will lead to overload. Instead I would do something like:

60/60/65/70
70/75/80/80
3x85/65/65/70
75/75/80/85
/85/4x90/70/70 and so on. And then if you stop again at 4x90 it's time to change.

The 3x is that if you supposedly didn't get 5. If you do get 5 just continue until you don't. One PR is not a reason to stop.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
My opinion is that that will lead to overload. Instead I would do something like:

60/60/65/70
70/75/80/80
3x85/65/65/70
75/75/80/85
/85/4x90/70/70 and so on. And then if you stop again at 4x90 it's time to change.

The 3x is that if you supposedly didn't get 5. If you do get 5 just continue until you don't. One PR is not a reason to stop.
Thanks. To keep it simple and summarize, keep going for as long as you can with fives. If you miss the weight for five then back off at least 20-25 percent and come back at it. However, if you feel like repeating a workout more than three times, you are probably better off starting a new cycle.
 

Timo Keskitalo

Triple-Digit Post Count
However, if you feel like repeating a workout more than three times, you are probably better off starting a new cycle.
I'm sorry maybe you misunderstood my bad writing?


The 3x is that if you supposedly didn't get 5.
Means just that, if I wrote 3x85 or 4x90 or whatever, you didn't get a five. So start over. It's easier to explain with smaller increments when you can raise weight every time.

If you manage something like 3x90, then start a new cycle and end at 4x90, maybe it's time to stop? Or maybe not? If you get 2x90 and next time 4x90, then it's likely that you get 5x90 in the next cycle. There should be some prospects of progress in the latter. Whereas in the first: you might get 5x90, but maybe that's your limit. You could go on to the new cycle and take it, or maybe turning to something else will give you a different and better stimulus.

I think that's the idea of PTTP. It's important to back down enough to get a breather. Something like 7-10 workouts in a wave
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
I think working up to an 8 RM, back off, then a 5RM, back off, then a 3RM, back off, then a 1RM, then work with something like Soju and Tuba, then start over is a decent way to use something like starting strength but with bigger jumps.

An alternate would be to do max rep set the last set and when you get to a certain number of reps on that last set, add weight and repeat.
As I am still benefiting from the high frequency linear step cycle and I am not good at the bench press, I found that I could not handle the second set for reps when it got to .9 bodyweight at the high frequency PTTP. It worked well until it didn't. It might be a good strategy when starting a new cycle or the first cycle after coming back to the lift after a layoff.
 
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