Avoiding "Explosive" Movements Short-Term

Discussion in 'Kettlebell' started by Deanne Amy Kuiper, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    So, I landed in the ER with a lower back spasm last week. I couldn't stand up straight and could hardly walk. This has been an on and off issue for many years. After a few days of muscle relaxers and Ibuprofen I'm pretty much back to normal. And I'll know more in the coming weeks after the MRI and physical therapy and possibly acupuncture (eek). Here's my issue...I am a little over 2 weeks into doing Pavel's 5 week whole-body kettlebell program, which includes goblet squats, swings, military press and pullups (awesome, btw) BUT I have to sideline the hard-style swing (for now...). I have been cleared (heck, even encouraged) by my doctor to continue strength training. However, I was advised to steer clear of "explosive" or plyometric movements until we figure out what's causing the issues with my lower back. The kicker: I had just bought the book Simple and Sinister and was starting to get into it for my next program. So now I'm kinda floundering around for some direction. I want to get back on the strength bandwagon ASAP so I'm in search of a new, simple, effective 4-6 week training program. I'm a fan of get-ups, goblet squats and I want to get closer to that elusive pullup. Please throw your recommendations at me! It doesn't have to be free (doesn't hurt, though). I'm open to buying the book! But it does need to be solid. Thank you! :) (Also, I'm a 38 year old female getting back into regular training after a few year hiatus in which I was having children and generally eating too many cookies.)
     
  2. Steve Freides

    Steve Freides Dir. of Community Engagement Senior Instructor

    @Deanne Amy Kuiper, if I haven't said so already, welcome to the StrongFirst forum.

    It's been my observation, based on my own experience, that when one is feeling a bit precarious, e.g., newly returned to strength training after a back injury - that was my situation, moving slowly allows one to better learn to stay safe while lifting.

    If you can deadlift safely and without pain, use that as a substitute for swings in your programming. If the deadlifts are light enough for you, you can, as you would with swings, work up to 10 sets of 10. You can also stick to sets of 5 if that seems to work better for you.

    -S-
     
  3. North Coast Miller

    North Coast Miller More than 2500 posts

    Deadlift, Good Mornings, there are a lot of other hinge movements you can substitute.
     
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  4. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    Steve,

    Thank you! And thank you for the suggestion. I hadn’t thought of simply trading out swings for another hinge movement. The rep scheme for the swings varies by day and is a wavy load, anywhere from 10 up to eventually around 22 sets of 7, EMOM, every other day, 3 days a week. The other 3 days a week are press/pull.
     
  5. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    Thanks, North Coast! Again, it hadn’t even occurred to me to substitute another hinge for the swings. Duh moment. This makes things much simpler.
     
  6. Anna C

    Anna C More than 5000 posts Certified Instructor

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  7. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    Thank you, Anna! I’m going to check that out.
     
  8. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    Hey! I noticed you’re in Biloxi. Not far from us here in Pensacola. Although we head to San Diego in August (Navy wife).
     
    Anna C likes this.
  9. Bauer

    Bauer More than 300 posts

    Whenever I get injured I try improve a neglected or underdeveloped body part or movement pattern. When I injured my thumb and could not do full TGUs I did a lot of roll to elbows for example - making this difficult phase much easier when I finally got back to doing full TGUs.

    Likewise you could work on your grip and general slow strength, for example using Deadlifts and Carries. Or focus on your mobility and posture. Or focus on glutes, abs and grip - as Pavel has recommended.
     
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  10. Glen

    Glen Quadruple-Digit Post Count

    When my back has spasmed I have always found single leg Deadlifts a great hip hinge substitute.

    Works on balancing hips whilst reduced load tends to make very back friendly for most (depending on what's the cause but you said you're still trying to find that out)
     
  11. Brett Jones

    Brett Jones StrongFirst Director of Education Staff Member Master Instructor

    Was there any physical therapy recommended?
    Have you ever had session with an SFG to get your form checked and dialed in?
     
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  12. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    Excellent ideas. I’ve swapped out swings for deadlifts. I’m focusing on form and slow strength.
     
    Bauer likes this.
  13. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    I have my first physical therapy appointment on Friday. I can’t seem to find an SFG near me. But we visit family in 2 weeks near Chicago and then move to San Diego in August. I’m hoping I’ll be able to find an SFG or a course in one of those places...
     
  14. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    I hadn’t considered single leg deadlifts. Wouldn’t that possibly put more strain on the back (especially if I didn’t have good form).
     
  15. Glen

    Glen Quadruple-Digit Post Count

    Depends on what you do - as it's a single leg movement with potential for contralateral loading (weight in other arm to leg working) the load is significantly reduced.

    As its a balance intensive exercise the movement is slower which allows more focus on positioning and back ' posture'

    The benefit is many back issues are hip issues with the symptoms being back spasms - single leg tends to help strengthen glute med which can go a long way to resolving it.

    If you use an appropriate load and speed I feel single leg can be more back friendly
     
    Lee likes this.
  16. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    I am definitely going to explore this and bring it up at PT. I could benefit from anything that helps with my lower back and hips. And I have good balance so it wouldn’t be a stretch to think I could do it.
     
    Glen likes this.
  17. Glen

    Glen Quadruple-Digit Post Count

  18. Steve Freides

    Steve Freides Dir. of Community Engagement Senior Instructor

    I agree with your hesitation here. Most people don't perform this lift correctly - they tend to jerk the weight off the ground. It wouldn't, all other things being equal, my recommendation to you.

    -S-
     
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  19. Deanne Amy Kuiper

    Deanne Amy Kuiper Double-Digit Post Count

    I have been referred to physical therapy and after only one session I have learned so much! My PT has me doing some very simple but rather intense daily strength practices meant to help strengthen and stabilize my core and correct the over rotation of my right hip/pelvis. The exercises also serve as a great warmup to the program I’m already doing! Win-win!
     
  20. LightningFast

    LightningFast Double-Digit Post Count

    1. Go light and build up slowly. Both load and the volume. High(er) repetition deadlifts do wonders for the back.
    2. Stretch hamstrings and hip flexors.
     

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