Kettlebell Exercises for the side and rotations.

Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)

Paul Nathan

Level 4 Valued Member
hello,

I am someone who spent about 15 years pretty much full time on a computer, and despite biking a fair bit, had strength issues with my core, lower back, and upper back. This persisted until a few years ago when it caused physical issues with huge pain. Since then, I've picked up some running, some strength work to address the issues that caused the pain, and now kettlebell. Running has caused minor injuries due to a weak core, so I've had to add some exercises there too - essentially I wobbled when running because the core was so weak! :(

I really enjoy kettlebell work, and one thing I've been thinking about is how to add "side" movements from my current band and bodyweight approaches:

- upper body rotations with hands, using a band (stand and pull a band using the core to rotate),
- side planks.
- bird dogs & "spidermans"

The Bent Press seems like a possible replacement for side planks, but I'm not totally sure - and for the rotational work for my core & the birddog/spidermans, I'm not sure what would be a good approach at all.

not that I think what I'm doing is wrong, but if I could get the kettlebells involved, it'd give a nice progress feeling as I load up heavier bells. :)

Regards & thanks,
Paul
 

rickyw

Level 7 Valued Member
If you do kettlebell work with a neutral pelvis you will likely never need any other core strength and conditining. The one handed swing, clean, and snatch train anti rotation. The snatch is in my mind a sort of standing loaded bird dog because of how the shoulder girdle and opposite glute work in concert. The TGU trains the core to stabilize the spine through all three planes of motion. Then there are windmills and double kettlebell front squats and the one armed press and the list goes on. I used to train all that core stuff but I have found the majority of kettlebell moves to be more advanced progressions of classic “core” work.
 

Shahaf Levin

Level 5 Valued Member
Turkish get ups?

That.

The bent press is an amazing body managment lift, and is some what of a staning TGU IMO. Since it is my bread & butter lift for about 19 months I feel comfortable to suggest that one should master the TGU prior to diving into the Bent press.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Slashers are a good option. KB Hot Potatoes with a bit of side lean.

Front squats, Zirchers, one arm Sott's press.

Front Loaders - hold KB inverted by the horns, incline body forward at the hips = to midpoint of a DL or Swing. Bend arms 90° at the elbow, drawing the weight up to your gut. Elevate the weight up to or a little past your forehead while keeping the arms locked 90° at the elbow. Lower, repeat.

Really, the more I do, the more I realize core work is every bit as subject to specificity as grip work. Everything is good, but not interchangeable.
 

Paul Nathan

Level 4 Valued Member
Thanks for the responses. Very interesting. Many new exercises to digest and consider. I particularly like the slasher for a rotational exercise. I shall have to experiment to see how it plays out vs my rotational band work.

What I am particularly concerned about is the side plank exerting a direct force on my side coming in from the side and replicating that. The TGU does not seem to exercise that force and resistance (although I might not be aware of it). A video example - 7 seconds in - .


thank you for your kind attention on this fine Monday.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Two key points, from my perspective:

1) Strengthening the torso muscles ("the core") is best done by challenging it to remain stable while you do difficult things such as move heavy weight or put your body in challenging positions. So, like most effective training, pick a variety that is challenging but you can still maintain good form, and progress as you get stronger. Lots of good ideas above, although I would certainly add that the big barbell movements are one of the best choices for strengthening the whole body together.

2) You don't have to move the muscles of the torso ("the core") to strengthen them. Isometric contraction is as effective, and perhaps in this case more effective, in achieving the stability, strength, and posture corrections that you are after. So, back to point #1 -- do hard things like make your limbs move heavy weight and make sure your abdominal and other torso muscles are fully engaged to maintain the stability of your spine while you do.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
One of our forum members (@Glen ) is teaching Pilates.
Now I know it may not seem so manly like KB's and such. I think even Pavel poked some good natured fun at it; but holy smokes, if someone is serious about 'core' training (I know there is no core...) then look no further than that. A number of years back I did it for a spell. Make no mistake....
 

Glen

Level 6 Valued Member
Thanks @offwidth

Have to agree that barbell big lifts and many of the Kettlebell staples are great for trunk strength bang for your buck exercises.

One of the things I have found doing Pilates was both a lack of strength and mobility at ranges not covered by those lifts. For many this isn't a big issue but I like to be strong in any movement.

If you look at the trunk/spine it has a number of movements
Flexion
Extension
Lateral flexion
Rotation

Training the trunk through the full range is good GPP to me.

If I had to choose three movements for a strong trunk it would be

Single arm Kettlebell swing
Plank/side plank
Turkish get ups

Other movements could be of benefit but think those three cover an awful lot
 
Last edited:

rickyw

Level 7 Valued Member
Pavel Tsatsouline had the strongest core ever measured by Stuart McGill, even compared to NFL football players. McGill says this in a stem talk podcast online. I don't think he got such a strong core with bodyweight/cable/theraband core workouts. Kindly speaking Paul, I think you're over thinking it.;)

What I am particularly concerned about is the side plank exerting a direct force on my side coming in from the side and replicating that. The TGU does not seem to exercise that force and resistance
My guess is your TGU is not heavy enough yet. Getting into and out of the lunge position with a unilateral hinge is very much coronal plane stability
 

Paul Nathan

Level 4 Valued Member
@Glen: I have finished my own quest for manliness :) . Ergo, can do pilates without concern for that kinda thing. I just like pushing weights around, what can I say. I'll definitely try to catch a pilates class next time the scheduling lines up. Should be educational.

@elli : For some reason, I had windmill in my head as some sort of 360-degree spinning arm movement. Well, heh... not so much after I checked it again. Now I know!

@AnnaC:

> the big barbell movements are one of the best choices for strengthening the whole body together.

I apologize, but I do not know what movements you specifically are referring to - I know of the squat, bench press, and deadlift, along with the clean&jerk and the snatch. I infer from their commonality that those are what you refer to. But, my knowledge of proper barbell technique is regrettably marginal today.

With respect to your general points, it seems that my essential task is to work on increasing the load to properly train stability requirements, and direct motion of said muscle is not required. That, I can do.

@Zack : the thread relating to Mr. Cook 's comments on carries was instructive and got me thinking about stability...

@rickyw:

> My guess is your TGU is not heavy enough yet. Getting into and out of the lunge position with a unilateral hinge is very much coronal plane stability

That may very well be. I'm still working away at the 16kg TGU. I'm not ready for the 24kg yet, although it's in sight. N.b., I might well be overthinking things, but then, the body is very complex and still not completely understood, so I'm content to spend time thinking and learning to avoid avoidable injuries.


Thank you, everyone, for your kind and knowledgeable comments. I have a surfeit of ideas to piece together and study.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
> the big barbell movements are one of the best choices for strengthening the whole body together.

I apologize, but I do not know what movements you specifically are referring to - I know of the squat, bench press, and deadlift, along with the clean&jerk and the snatch. I infer from their commonality that those are what you refer to. But, my knowledge of proper barbell technique is regrettably marginal today.

Yes, the big 4 strength builders: squat, bench press, overhead press, and deadlift. Finding a coach would be the best way to go for learning technique.
 

Shawn90

Level 5 Valued Member
Loaded carries like waiter walks and rack walks.

I see so many people run with poor posture on daily basis it hurts my eyes. Fix your posture first, learn how to stand and walk properly. Start with your feet the toes should point forward.
 
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)
Top Bottom