Farmer Carries

Trever

Double-Digit Post Count
Is there an optimum time to be doing a farmer carry.
I’ve been doing a couple rounds of farmer carries at the end of my workouts after reading Dan John articles, but I’m not sure what the strategy should be.
Do I carry a couple plates/kettlebells/dumbbells until my grip starts to give out? Or should I be stopping long before that? Grip seems to be the limiting factor for me.
Thanks.
 

Blake Nelson

Double-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
I tell students to carry "until they are very excited to set the weight down" for any variety of loaded carry. Vary the load and distance every time and try to add to both over time. And always remember that safety is fundamental. You, not the bells, decide when the bells go to the ground.
 

Trever

Double-Digit Post Count
Thanks Blake, that’s very helpful.

How many sets of carries would you recommend? Is there a min and max number of sets or repeats that you would recommend. Is that something I should vary each time as well? Thanks again.
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
In this program, I was doing 4 x 90 sec "heavy" (i.e. as heavy as I could carry for 90 seconds at a time), and it seemed to be a good format. Resting 1-2 minutes between carries. A great thing to add to the end of any session, or do later -- because it's real work, but you don't work up a sweat.
 

Timmer C

Double-Digit Post Count
I like to do a carry variant where the fist points up and the kettlebell is upside down. (The ball of the kettlebell is above the fist.) In this case, one doesn't go for a set amount of time but stops just before the ball lets you know it wants to flop. And it will.
 

vegpedlr

More than 500 posts
I like to go by feel at the end of a workout. Use up whatever energy is left. If I'm feeling flat, do a simple farmer's and quit. If I'm feeling frisky, do some more. Done lighter, they can be a good warmup, helping wake up the body to get tight.
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

In opinion, it depends on the goal.

Fist of all, sets and reps may vary in function of what we want to achieve (fat loss, hypertrophy, etc...)
Tip: The Training Method That Improves Everything | T Nation
In this case, they are an actual part of the training routine.

They can also be excellent at the end of a session, as a finisher, so the volume is way less than in the links I mentionned.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Blake Nelson

Double-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
How many sets of carries would you recommend? Is there a min and max number of sets or repeats that you would recommend. Is that something I should vary each time as well? Thanks again.
The way I program most sessions, 2-3 sets is about the right number. These are typically done after TGUs, swings, squats, etc. Varying the type of carry is enough to "wave the load". That is to say, 2-3 tough rounds of waiter or bottom-up carries will be much easier on the body than 2-3 tough rounds of farmer carries.
I have had classes do a session that is 100% carries, but these are more "special events" than regular training.

This is a great quote.
Thanks, Mike! I like it because it puts the control in the had of the student. It promotes challenging yourself but keeps safety in mind.
 

Shawn90

More than 500 posts
I like to go for distance. 16mtr, 24, seldomly walking longer than 24mtr (30sec) with non-timed rests. And heavy, close to double bodyweight.
 
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