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Bodyweight Full planche on rings

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NİLKA24

First Post
Hi, i've got a question.

Its my goal to hit the full planche on rings, but I am struggeling very hard at the moment.
I can perform a solid straddled planche on rings for about 15 s and I am also able to hold the full planche on floor and parallets for 15s too. I am also capable of holding the maltese on rings for about 5s, but I cant even hold the full planche on rings.
What could be the reason? I thought maltese on rings is even more difficult. And 15 s Full planche on floor seems to be a good foundation in my opinion.

Thanks for all replies
 

Tarzan

Level 6 Valued Member
Adding instability to any move makes it much harder. Even though you can do the full Planche on the floor or the parallettes (which is an awesome effort) doing them on the rings is a whole new ball game. Muscles all over your body have to fire in different way to keep you up there.

Keep working the straddled Plance and try to gradually progress to a full Planche, that's normal to take quite a while to get full Planche on the rings.
 
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NİLKA24

First Post
Adding instability to any move makes it much harder. Even though you can do the full Planche on the floor or the parallettes (which is an awesome effort) doing them on the rings is a whole new ball game. Muscles all over your body have to fire in different way to keep you up there.

Keep working the straddled Plance and try to gradually progress to a full Planche, that's normal for take quite a while to get full Planche on the rings.
 

NİLKA24

First Post
Ok Tarzan
Thank you very much for your reply.
I think adding some instability in the training progress is a super idea
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
The planche, even a tuck planche is a move I really want to do. I can swing my body up to a tuck planch on the parallettes but can't keep it there. :(
 

Tarzan

Level 6 Valued Member
Ok Tarzan
Thank you very much for your reply.
I think adding some instability in the training progress is a super idea
Perhaps my first reply could have been worded better.

I was trying to say that the Planche on the rings is adding a lot of instability to the exercise, so to go from the floor or parallettes to the rings is making it much more difficult. It's normal to take a while to transfer a stable hold on the floor to an unstable hold on the rings.

Awesome work by the way, I never got a full Planche that I could hold for more than about a second. My straddle Planche on parallettes was solid but I never mastered the real thing.
 
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Tarzan

Level 6 Valued Member
The planche, even a tuck planche is a move I really want to do. I can swing my body up to a tuck planch on the parallettes but can't keep it there. :(

You're a pretty big guy aren't you @Kozushi ?

A full Planche takes a lot of dedicated practice for most smaller guys that didn't train gymnastics as a kid. So being taller makes it a lot harder because of the leverages involved. That's not to suggest a big guy can't do one, I've seen quite a few big guys who have but something like that takes so much dedication when gravity and leverage is against you that it would probably be good to schedule that early in your training while you are still fresh.

If that's a goal then specializing in that will get you there the fastest but as you're doing other stuff as well it can often be better focus on one or two main goals at a time and put some of the other stuff into maintenance mode where you just do the bare minimum to retain the skill so you can keep progressing towards your current goal.

It took me quite a while to get a tuck Planche too but the straddle Planche came a bit quicker. Then the full Planche (if you can call a 1 second hold a full Planche) took quite a while.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
You're a pretty big guy aren't you @Kozushi ?

A full Planche takes a lot of dedicated practice for most smaller guys that didn't train gymnastics as a kid. So being taller makes it a lot harder because of the leverages involved. That's not to suggest a big guy can't do one, I've seen quite a few big guys who have but something like that takes so much dedication when gravity and leverage is against you that it would probably be good to schedule that early in your training while you are still fresh.

If that's a goal then specializing in that will get you there the fastest but as you're doing other stuff as well it can often be better focus on one or two main goals at a time and put some of the other stuff into maintenance mode where you just do the bare minimum to retain the skill so you can keep progressing towards your current goal.

It took me quite a while to get a tuck Planche too but the straddle Planche came a bit quicker. Then the full Planche (if you can call a 1 second hold a full Planche) took quite a while.
I didn't realize that it was as hard as this. If it is indeed so hard then maybe I will indeed put it on the back burner for now. I've got enough to handle among S&S, NW, the SFG 1 certification (and SFB if it comes up in Toronto sometime) and judo.
 

User 7569

Guest
Have you tried the bodyweightfitness subreddit?

They are a bit more into the gymnastics style movements..
 

Hung

Level 7 Valued Member
i think the reason is the maltese doesn't require much leaning forward compare to planche? It hits the biceps and the lats muscle more. And on the ring or on the unstable objects, i found it more difficult to leaning forward ( i don't own the rings but i sometime hold tuck/ adv tuck on the kettlebell)
Anyway, i'm not an expert about it. It's always great to have people working on calisthenics skills on this forum. I'm on my road to planche myself- hope that in the next few months, i could hit the number of 15s
 
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