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Kettlebell Gray Cook on Loaded Carries for SF

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MikeTheBear

Level 7 Valued Member
Thanks for reviving the thread. I especially like what he says about how loaded carries take care of the entire core and you don't need to "micromanage" it (he says this about 2:34 into the video). I am currently doing physical therapy for my bad back (although I doubt I'll avoid surgery) and they have me doing various core stability drills. With all due respect to PTs, I feel that these are the types of drills that "micromanage the core." I hate doing them, they seem lame, and don't really help. I'm going farmers walking later.
 

bencrush

Level 6 Valued Member
My 6-year-old daughter likes it when I have her stand on a 25lb (or sometimes 45lbs) plate that is loaded onto my 2" vertical bar and then carry her around the yard in a slightly hunched over farmer's walk with the 2" vertical bar. I did that a few times with her when she was 3. Then maybe a dozen times when she was 4. Probably the same at 5. But since she turned 6 in April, she's asked me to carry her around like that a bunch of times. It is a surprisingly good grip workout for not much total weight. Partly due to the unbalanced loading. I like to mix it up while I'm lugging her on the vertical bar by sometimes doing a few rows with as much range of motion as feasible.

It's fun for her, and a small dose of grip work at the same time. Win-win!
 

MikeTheBear

Level 7 Valued Member
fwiw spinal decompression works pretty well for disc issues, if thats your situation. Cured mine and a friends.

It offers temporary relief but the pain comes back. I have a big mess back there. An x-ray showed that on one level there was hardly any disc left and the vertebrae were bone on bone. I get my MRI results tomorrow.
 

vlam

Level 1 Valued Member
Can someone explain if there are any differences between doing farmer/loaded carries for distance vs. holding the same amount of weight but walking/marching in place? Does one offer more benefits than the other? Thanks!
 

Stu

Level 5 Valued Member
Just noticed this thread and it is timely as I literally just wrote in my training log how much I am enjoying and feeling the benefit of including loaded carries in my training.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
Can someone explain if there are any differences between doing farmer/loaded carries for distance vs. holding the same amount of weight but walking/marching in place? Does one offer more benefits than the other? Thanks!

One is a lot more boring... ;)

I doubt it's significant, but I think a loaded locomotion pattern probably has a few advantages just by making that natural forward movement stronger.
 

MikeTheBear

Level 7 Valued Member
Can someone explain if there are any differences between doing farmer/loaded carries for distance vs. holding the same amount of weight but walking/marching in place? Does one offer more benefits than the other? Thanks!

When you walk forward your body needs to be more tense to control or "tame," as Pavel likes to say, the momentum of the weight. For an added challenge, try walking upstairs holding a weight - all kinds of stability demands.
 

Jan

Level 4 Valued Member
For an added challenge, try walking upstairs holding a weight - all kinds of stability demands.

Don't forget to hold the handrail! You do not want to tumble down a flight of stairs with a kettlebell in your hand.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
For an added challenge, try walking upstairs holding a weight - all kinds of stability demands.
+1. My favorite indoor carry workout is to start at one end of the basement, walk to the other, go up the steps to the first floor, around the first floor once, back down the steps to the basement, and across the basement to the starting point. One handed or two handed, it's taxing in a good way.

-S-
 

MikeTheBear

Level 7 Valued Member
+1. My favorite indoor carry workout is to start at one end of the basement, walk to the other, go up the steps to the first floor, around the first floor once, back down the steps to the basement, and across the basement to the starting point. One handed or two handed, it's taxing in a good way.

-S-

I do the same thing in my basement. Once I tried to go up the stairs with a KB held overhead. A humbling experience.
 
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