Health Routine

Shahaf Levin

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
To elaborate on yoga, a drawback of the way it is often taught is the frequent change of sequencing. Each teacher has a style, and they tend not to do the same thing all the time. This keeps the student’s focus on the teacher, wondering what’s next, instead of focusing inward on what’s happening in their body and mind. It’s almost like a form of entertainment.
Unfortunately this is true to most fitness "classes". Teacher focused form of entertainment or doing what one is "expected" to, rather than student focused learning process... I'll stop here before it will turn to a full rant.

And to the OP. I do OS for over two years with great results. I also do some club swings. My body and mind are strong and loose. I think you got some great advice in this thread, and as @vegpedlr suggested, pick a system, learn it and follow it as it is designed. Don't mix and match even if the only reason is giving your mind a break.
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
Unfortunately this is true to most fitness "classes". Teacher focused form of entertainment or doing what one is "expected" to, rather than student focused learning process... I'll stop here before it will turn to a full rant.

And to the OP. I do OS for over two years with great results. I also do some club swings. My body and mind are strong and loose. I think you got some great advice in this thread, and as @vegpedlr suggested, pick a system, learn it and follow it as it is designed. Don't mix and match even if the only reason is giving your mind a break.
Good advice. The OS has been a highly recommended option.
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
Try walking (or marching) to a children's playground structure with a pair of gardening gloves on and having fun figuring out ways to do dips, push ups, pull ups, squats, yoga movements :)
Actually, this is something I used to do since I live in a neighborhood with tons of parks and schools! It goes awesome with the walking protocol as well, as there are lots of nice places to walk around here!
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
Walk, walk, walk! This covers all four of your demands and does it in the most natural and correct way possible for a human being! We are mostly leg and so we are supposed to walk. Our bodies are designed for walking more than for lifting. If you can, add in some running but don't get obsessed with it - do it for a few minutes here and there, since it adds muscle and strength.

To me yoga and tai chi are great things but they're beating around the bush if all you want is to stay fit and healthy! Walking and a bit of running is what nature would have us do, so do them!

I'm thought to be strong by a lot of people who train judo with me, yet my main exercise off the mats for my entire life has been long walks! And yes, I do train with power lifters - I don't find them all that strong on the mats since their strength is limited to specific angles of motion.
Yes walking on most days will be a big part of this protocol. Like another poster mentioned, walking to a park to train and doing my movements outside and mixing in "park movements" like dips and pullups seems like a very peaceful and open and healthy way to train. Then I'd take a nice long walk or jog/cooldown as Harold Motz mentioned. Another thing I realized about powerlifting, is I didn't want to be just good at lifting a barbell in those 3 lifts. Most of the time, I was feeling so exhausted from the training, that even picking up a pallet at work was burdensome. I also want to develop strength for "life" usefulness.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Yes walking on most days will be a big part of this protocol. Like another poster mentioned, walking to a park to train and doing my movements outside and mixing in "park movements" like dips and pullups seems like a very peaceful and open and healthy way to train. Then I'd take a nice long walk or jog/cooldown as Harold Motz mentioned. Another thing I realized about powerlifting, is I didn't want to be just good at lifting a barbell in those 3 lifts. Most of the time, I was feeling so exhausted from the training, that even picking up a pallet at work was burdensome. I also want to develop strength for "life" usefulness.
Why not keep doing the lifts you always did but with much less weight?
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
Why not keep doing the lifts you always did but with much less weight?
This is what I plan to do in the future. I will most likely have a small amount of maximal strength training (dead lift and a press), and do the rest of training in a Yin like modality. The max strength training has to go back to practice, as opposed to mere grunting and straining, so loads will drop and technique will be of higher focus than resistance.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
This is what I plan to do in the future. I will most likely have a small amount of maximal strength training (dead lift and a press), and do the rest of training in a Yin like modality. The max strength training has to go back to practice, as opposed to mere grunting and straining, so loads will drop and technique will be of higher focus than resistance.
There is also training more for muscular endurance than for maximum strength, so higher reps with less weight.

Have you given S&S a try? It's a kind of elegant compromise among strength, endurance, mobility and between free and body weight type training.
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
This is what I plan to do in the future. I will most likely have a small amount of maximal strength training (dead lift and a press), and do the rest of training in a Yin like modality. The max strength training has to go back to practice, as opposed to mere grunting and straining, so loads will drop and technique will be of higher focus than resistance.
A compromise would be to find a 2 day / week template for strength (try tactical barbell) and then do your walking/playground workouts on the other 5 days.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
I would recommend frequently mobility snacks throughout the day.

  1. Hello StrongFirst!

    I'm writing in the bodyweight forum for the first time to inquire about a routine for someone looking to step away from the barbell for a bit. I've trained with the barbell for as long as I can recall and after quite some time, I've felt the toll of this. As a powerlifting enthusiast, most of my training has centered around this but I seek a change that will help "reset" my body and allow overall systematic recovery to occur. I'm seeking ideas to create a callisthenic based program similar to that of yoga or tai chi to accomplish this. The main goals of this program are to
    1) Deload the spine and joints
    2) Restore harmony of movement
    3) Enhance flow and energy of the body
    $) Strengthen joints and create balance and postural optimization
    ... Thank you!
After quite a few years of trial and error, here are the main sources and routines that I use. Almost the same as Adam M. in this post!

1. Concepts

- Flexible steel by Jon Engum main concepts, lengthen and create space
- Pavel Relax into stretch and super joints for an overview of the role of CNS in stretching
- Convict conditioning 2 Trifecta for practice but a good overview of the reason that you should in do actual movements to improve mobility rather than focus on corrective exercises. Your ankle flexibility will get better by actually squatting with proper form for example.
- Five minute flow by Max Shank: move for its own sake. Have fun rather than the druggery of traditional stretching.

2. Protocols

- Follow the daily movement in Flexible Steel it is mostly joint circles.
- Other joint circle routines, google "CARS" articular rotation
- trifecta Convict Conditioning 2. Gold.
- I agree with others. Find a set routine you can do daily. Don't program hop for this but blend it into a system that works for you.

Yoga

- Do a daily sun saluation or some other routine the same every day rather than a teacher-focused class as others have mentioned. You want to build habits, not take time away from strength training.
- Yin Yoga long holds, which is actually the same concept kind of as Pavel's relax into stretch. Two minute gentle stretches. I do this before bed.

Decompression

- Hang from a bar for time once a day: spinal decompression
- lat stretch from a playground bar.
- Downward dog to cobra wave it.
- Put your legs up on the wall for a few minutes before bed each night. Good for circulation and relaxation.

Hips

- Goblet squat prying or just sit in the "Asian squat" recommended by Bret Contraras(?) once a day. I added this to the Trifecta to make it the Quadfecta.
- You might also add the "world's greatest stretch"
- Alternatively, squat and rotate, Ido Portal.

Original Strength resets

- weird but great. I agree. I do a get up roll away and back to the bell and then do another getup for my S&S. Works wonders.
- Pair the head rolls with your S&S bridge warmup. Integrate OS into a regular routine.

Crawls

The only one here that I should do but don't for some reason. OS has it covered.

Shoulders

Face pulls and band pullaparts with bands. This is a great video I got from this community.

Walking and breathing

- gentle restorative long, easy walks and meditation with a breath focus. Practice breathing while recovering from a set. S&S has a few pages on this.

I have found these better than Yoga. Hatha Yoga transitions are too fast. You gotta sit into the stretch and work strength as well.

You won't regret investing in your quality of movement. It improves quality of life and the improved posture and movement will actually set you up for future strength gains. Win-win.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
Hello StrongFirst!

I'm writing in the bodyweight forum for the first time to inquire about a routine for someone looking to step away from the barbell for a bit. I've trained with the barbell for as long as I can recall and after quite some time, I've felt the toll of this. As a powerlifting enthusiast, most of my training has centered around this but I seek a change that will help "reset" my body and allow overall systematic recovery to occur. I'm seeking ideas to create a callisthenic based program similar to that of yoga or tai chi to accomplish this. The main goals of this program are to
1) Deload the spine and joints
2) Restore harmony of movement
3) Enhance flow and energy of the body
$) Strengthen joints and create balance and postural optimization

Thank you!
After quite a few years of trial and error, here are the main sources and routines that I use. Almost the same as Adam M. in this post!

1. Concepts

- Flexible steel by Jon Engum main concepts, lengthen and create space
- Pavel Relax into stretch and super joints for an overview of the role of CNS in stretching
- Convict conditioning 2 Trifecta for practice but a good overview of the reason that you should in do actual movements to improve mobility rather than focus on corrective exercises. Your ankle flexibility will get better by actually squatting with proper form for example.
- Five minute flow by Max Shank: move for its own sake. Have fun rather than the druggery of traditional stretching.

2. Protocols

- Follow the daily movement in Flexible Steel it is mostly joint circles.
- Other joint circle routines, google "CARS" articular rotation
- trifecta Convict Conditioning 2. Gold.
- I agree with others. Find a set routine you can do daily. Don't program hop for this but blend it into a system that works for you.

Yoga

- Do a daily sun saluation or some other routine the same every day rather than a teacher-focused class as others have mentioned. You want to build habits, not take time away from strength training.
- Yin Yoga long holds, which is actually the same concept kind of as Pavel's relax into stretch. Two minute gentle stretches. I do this before bed.

Decompression

- Hang from a bar for time once a day: spinal decompression
- lat stretch from a playground bar.
- Downward dog to cobra wave it.
- Put your legs up on the wall for a few minutes before bed each night. Good for circulation and relaxation.

Hips

- Goblet squat prying or just sit in the "Asian squat" recommended by Bret Contraras(?) once a day. I added this to the Trifecta to make it the Quadfecta.
- You might also add the "world's greatest stretch"
- Alternatively, squat and rotate, Ido Portal.

Original Strength resets

- weird but great. I agree. I do a get up roll away and back to the bell and then do another getup for my S&S. Works wonders.
- Pair the head rolls with your S&S bridge warmup. Integrate OS into a regular routine.

Crawls

The only one here that I should do but don't for some reason. OS has it covered.

Shoulders

Face pulls and band pullaparts with bands. This is a great video I got from this community.

Walking and breathing

- gentle restorative long, easy walks and meditation with a breath focus. Practice breathing while recovering from a set. S&S has a few pages on this.

I have found these better than Yoga. Hatha Yoga transitions are too fast. You gotta sit into the stretch and work strength as well.

You won't regret investing in your quality of movement. It improves quality of life and the improved posture and movement will actually set you up for future strength gains. Win-win.
 
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Al Ciampa

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
The preface to this is that I am a big fan of crawling, especially in the rehab clinic.

But I question, as Andrew Read does, how much OS one needs if they are frequently walking and/or running. In the framework of a “gym rat”, it’s understandable. But if you’re out on the road or trails, attending to your technique—I’m not so sure.
 

vegpedlr

More than 500 posts
After seeing so much praise for OS, I gave some of the resets and crawling a try. The result was a big “MEH.” I don’t get it. Maybe daily yoga covers it, but when I tried OS I wasn’t practicing. I did find rocking and crawling helpful when I tweaked my back last week with a DL.
 

Adam R Mundorf

More than 500 posts
Here's an interesting instagram post from Ido Portal about stretching. He says that proper movement will take care of your mobility/flexibility needs. It's interesting to see his thoughts evolve because his stretching regimens used to be brutal.

Ido Portal on Instagram: “I never really stretch anymore. I believe if you’re stretching for years and years- first you are not doing it right(should be working…”

I agree with what Al said. OS resets are more for people who are desk workers who don't get much if any movement all day.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
Here's an interesting instagram post from Ido Portal about stretching. He says that proper movement will take care of your mobility/flexibility needs. It's interesting to see his thoughts evolve because his stretching regimens used to be brutal.

Ido Portal on Instagram: “I never really stretch anymore. I believe if you’re stretching for years and years- first you are not doing it right(should be working…”

I agree with what Al said. OS resets are more for people who are desk workers who don't get much if any movement all day.
Agreed. I will probably spend ten hours today writing and editing and making powerpoint... This is why I do all of the above.
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
After quite a few years of trial and error, here are the main sources and routines that I use. Almost the same as Adam M. in this post!

1. Concepts

- Flexible steel by Jon Engum main concepts, lengthen and create space
- Pavel Relax into stretch and super joints for an overview of the role of CNS in stretching
- Convict conditioning 2 Trifecta for practice but a good overview of the reason that you should in do actual movements to improve mobility rather than focus on corrective exercises. Your ankle flexibility will get better by actually squatting with proper form for example.
- Five minute flow by Max Shank: move for its own sake. Have fun rather than the druggery of traditional stretching.

2. Protocols

- Follow the daily movement in Flexible Steel it is mostly joint circles.
- Other joint circle routines, google "CARS" articular rotation
- trifecta Convict Conditioning 2. Gold.
- I agree with others. Find a set routine you can do daily. Don't program hop for this but blend it into a system that works for you.

Yoga

- Do a daily sun saluation or some other routine the same every day rather than a teacher-focused class as others have mentioned. You want to build habits, not take time away from strength training.
- Yin Yoga long holds, which is actually the same concept kind of as Pavel's relax into stretch. Two minute gentle stretches. I do this before bed.

Decompression

- Hang from a bar for time once a day: spinal decompression
- lat stretch from a playground bar.
- Downward dog to cobra wave it.
- Put your legs up on the wall for a few minutes before bed each night. Good for circulation and relaxation.

Hips

- Goblet squat prying or just sit in the "Asian squat" recommended by Bret Contraras(?) once a day. I added this to the Trifecta to make it the Quadfecta.
- You might also add the "world's greatest stretch"
- Alternatively, squat and rotate, Ido Portal.

Original Strength resets

- weird but great. I agree. I do a get up roll away and back to the bell and then do another getup for my S&S. Works wonders.
- Pair the head rolls with your S&S bridge warmup. Integrate OS into a regular routine.

Crawls

The only one here that I should do but don't for some reason. OS has it covered.

Shoulders

Face pulls and band pullaparts with bands. This is a great video I got from this community.

Walking and breathing

- gentle restorative long, easy walks and meditation with a breath focus. Practice breathing while recovering from a set. S&S has a few pages on this.

I have found these better than Yoga. Hatha Yoga transitions are too fast. You gotta sit into the stretch and work strength as well.

You won't regret investing in your quality of movement. It improves quality of life and the improved posture and movement will actually set you up for future strength gains. Win-win.
Wow you really covered all the bases! I've got a band for the pull aparts, just gotta start doing that. Have also been doing Max's flow routine, which is very tonic inducing and fun at the same time. I like that it allows you to utilize your own movement creativity and to intuitively move by using your body to guide you. Walks are always nice, though the California fires have deterred me from spending too much time outdoors. Did a nice nature bath at a wildlife reserve on Monday. Thanks for all that input!
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
Wow you really covered all the bases! I've got a band for the pull aparts, just gotta start doing that. Have also been doing Max's flow routine, which is very tonic inducing and fun at the same time. I like that it allows you to utilize your own movement creativity and to intuitively move by using your body to guide you. Walks are always nice, though the California fires have deterred me from spending too much time outdoors. Did a nice nature bath at a wildlife reserve on Monday. Thanks for all that input!
There are another couple of reasons why gentle movement exercise like walking and joint circles are important. As noted, we are designed to move, we are designed to go long distances at a slow pace and sprint (think hunter stalking prey), but we also need to keep synovial joints healthy, so we don't become the tin man with frozen shoulders at age 50 or so, and we also need to naturally drain lymph, not new-age cleansing/detox voodoo, just simply by moving. Exercise & Lymph Nodes
 
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Ricky01

Triple-Digit Post Count
As an OS level 2 coach I am really biased!! It has improved my ability to move (I came to it after a back injury).

OS is now the basis of all my strength training.

In two years I have put aside the barbell (although praise those that enjoy it if that's your thing) - I have moved from pretty serious (face contorting) back pain about 80% of the day to some mild stiffness about 10% of the day - or pain free.

I know you didn't want to improve areas such as pistols etc, but during this time I have managed a pistol for the first time after my back injury by simply crawling and armchair rocking. Since then I have also managed a shrimp squat and a pistol/shrimp squat flow.

Recently I managed a one arm pushup for the first time simply by backwards crawling and loading this with mini bands (I have also crawled on hills, with sleds etc).

My endurance has improved and - after not long crawling since June - hit a 12 minute PB backwards crawl, crawling for 50 minutes (the same as my forwards crawling time).

I know this sounds like a 'check me out' post and I genuinely apologise. I am trying to convey the point that OS is a movement restoration system that has removed and is removing pain everyday, but has also (without intentionally trying to) improved endurance and maximal strength.

Take time to explore each of the resets. When I started OS, rolling didn't make me feel much better, but I have given it time and now it is amazing and life changing.

I started off adding OS as a warmup, but the warm up has now become the workout.

One thing I tell everyone is - do not dismiss the system because of the perceived simplicity.

Richard
 
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Jim Lauerman

More than 300 posts
As an OS level 2 coach I am really biased!! It has improved my ability to move (I came to it after a back injury).

OS is now the basis of all my strength training.

In two years I have put aside the barbell (although praise those that enjoy it if that's your thing) - I have moved from pretty serious (face contorting) back pain about 80% of the day to some mild stiffness about 10% of the day - or pain free.

I know you didn't want to improve areas such as pistols etc, but during this time I have managed a pistol for the first time after my back injury by simply crawling and armchair rocking. Since then I have also managed a shrimp squat and a pistol/shrimp squat flow.

Recently I managed a one arm pushup for the first time simply by backwards crawling and loading this with mini bands (I have also crawled on hills, with sleds etc).

My endurance has improved and - after not long crawling since June - hit a 12 minute PB backwards crawl, crawling for 50 minutes (the same as my forwards crawling time).

I know this sounds like a 'check me out' post and I genuinely apologise. I am trying to convey the point that OS is a movement restoration system that has removed and is removing pain everyday, but has also (without intentionally trying to) improved endurance and maximal strength.

Take time to explore each of the resets. When I started OS, rolling didn't make me feel much better, but I have given it time and now it is amazing and life changing.

I started off adding OS as a warmup, but the warm up has now become the workout.

One thing I tell everyone is - do not dismiss the system because of the perceived simplicity.

Richard
Like @Ricky01 also an OS Level 2 Coach. I can second what he says, but I still very much enjoy my swings, goblet squats, getups, and presses.

I do OS resets EVERY day, however. It’s great stuff.

Jim
 
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