Kefir

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
@zarn Sometime ago I wrote this:
There is an easy workaround for kefir that I use: Buy organic whole milk (for example from aldi, netto or whatever) + one pack of a well tasting industrial kefir (probably Kalinka Kefir from Mueller). In your carton there is a little bit of space on top of the milk - fill that space with the kefir that you bought. Store the milk carton for two days at room temperature and you'll have a full litre of organic, well tasting kefir. Refrigerate the kefir after the two days of growing. You can then use your self made kefir for making the next kefir.

I use kefir for my muesli and produce about 3-4 litres per week, usually 2 litres at a time.
 

Harald Motz

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
@zarn Sometime ago I wrote this:
this is the description I started again with kefir. Really easy.
Then I ordered some organic kefir grains again and was happy enough, that a local farmer sells fresh raw organic milk via a coin machine, where I can get the milk anytime anyday directly filled into my bottles.

when I come home with the milk I sieve every bottle which fermented then 3-4 days in the brown bottles at room temperature. The grains from one kefir bottle go to the milk bottle the sieved kefir goes back to the bottle again. I do this with every bottle and put the kefir in the fridge and the milk vaccinated with the grains comes to the shelf to ferment for a cycle.

Sometimes I wash the grains under tap water and whe they get to much I either give them away or eat some.

Screenshot_2019-10-20-13-25-53.png
Fermentation of the milk on the shelf.

- Kefir likes it dark (either brown bottles or covering with a sheet)
- room temperature is just right
- the bottles or jar should be closed but enable to leave pressure for developing CO2 gas
- shorter fermentation the kefir is more mild
- longer fermentation makes it sour with almost no lactose and more casein

To make kefir is really easy and since I have raw organic grass fed milk it never was that good. I Go Mad about kefir...
 

Tarzan

Level 4 Valued Member
Hi Harald. It's good to see you posting again,

I revived my Kefir grains a few months ago, I'd left them sitting in the fridge in finished kefir for almost twelve months and they looked like a lost cause. The Kefir had pink and grey mold all over the top and it smelled really funky so I was going to throw the whole batch out but I thought I'd put them in some fresh milk and see if they were still viable.

They were a bit slow to get started again but now the grains are growing quicker than ever. I didn't drink the first few batches until the grains started to multiply and the fermentation rate got back to normal but now it's just as good as it ever was. I was a bit worried about drinking it again the first time so I started with a few small amounts over a few days with no problems and now I'm drinking about 300ml a day with no problems, so it seems like it's fine.

I read somewhere that whey protein is detrimental to gut bacteria and it always seemed to give me problems but I started mixing about 30% kefir in with it after it's been mixed with milk and the gut issues disappeared . I was always quite adverse to protein supplements before I started mixing it with kefir because of the gut issues but adding a bit of kefir seems to make it much easier on my digestive system,

I have too many grains now and I'm eating the excess almost every day.
 

Harald Motz

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
@Tarzan: kefir is really great, not a hint of a downside. It is grateful and I am grateful too to it. As I have 3-4 liter of it on a daily basis it provides a great base of fat and protein. It is years ago that I got some protein powder.

Had a training session and came out of the shower a few minutes ago. I opened my fridge took a bottle out shook it for a few seconds and now enjoying it (over and over) again. The brown bottles I have for 9 months now clean them and use recycle them over and over also.

Not to mention all the digestive benefits, why wouldn't everyone ferment with kefir. I am also interested in SCOBY (a bacteria that feeds off other sugars such as fructose, sucrose, glucose) and is what makes Kombucha.
Screenshot_2019-10-23-19-44-17.png
A batch if my kombucha. Green tea fermentation at it's finest.
 

SuperSoldier177

Level 1 Valued Member
I'm glad this post was raised from the dead, so to speak. I have a few questions. I know of the health benefits of fermented foods, as well as things like yogurt, cottage cheese and such. My problem is I'm a very picker eater. I don't like yougurt, cream cheese or pudding due to the consistency, and have refrained from trying any of the fermented foods, because I'm not fond of strong flavors, especially sour or tart things.

My question regarding Kefir in particular, and other fermented food/drinks, like the kombucha above, is how do the taste?
Could I mix the Kefir with my protein shake without completely ruining the flavor?
I know that ultimately it will be up to me to make that decision, just looking for some opinions to see if I even want to try.
Thanks all.
 

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
My question regarding Kefir in particular, and other fermented food/drinks, like the kombucha above, is how do the taste?
I love kefir: A bit sparkling, sweet-sour and creamy. It is not overly strong, yet pretty special. I guess it might be difficult for you but could work with some mango or maybe banana in the shake (non-sour fruits).
 

SuperSoldier177

Level 1 Valued Member
Yeah, I tried it yesterday, plain. Worse than sour cream, and I never though those words would come out of my mouth. I'll have to try with some strawberrys or somethig. I appreciate the tip.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
There are now store bought kefir drinks. Try some and see if you find one you like.

-S-
 
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