all posts post new thread

Other/Mixed PARTIAL RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISE FOR MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
PARTIAL RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISE IS EFFECTIVE FOR FACILITATING MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY AND FUNCTION THROUGH SUSTAINED INTRAMUSCULAR HYPOXIA IN YOUNG TRAINED MEN

ABSTRACT

Goto, M, Chikako, M, Hirayama, T, Terada, S, Nirengi, S, Kurosawa, Y, Nagano, A, and Hamaoka, T.
Partial range of motion exercise is effective for facilitating muscle hypertrophy and function through sustained intramuscular hypoxia in young trained men. J Strength Cond Res 33(5): 1286–1294, 2019— The acute response to and long-term effects of partial range of motion exercise (PRE) and full range of motion exercise (FRE) of elbow extensors were compared in young trained men. The PRE was expected to increase the intramuscular hypoxic environment, which was theorized to enhance muscular hypertrophy. Forty-four resistance-trained men were divided into 2 training groups, PRE (n = 22) or FRE (n = 22) group, and performed the PRE or FRE acute exercise protocol. The PRE (elbow range from 458 to 908) and FRE (from 08 to 1208) acute protocols consisted of 3 sets of 8 repetitions, with an 8RM, and an equivalent workload. After the initial testing, the training program for each group, comprised 3 training sessions per week for 8 weeks, was started. The acute responses of area under the oxygenated hemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) curve, blood lactate concentration, and root mean square of electromyography were significantly higher both before and after PRE than FRE training. Long-term effects were produced by both PRE and FRE, with significant (p # 0.05) increases in cross-sectional area (CSA) of triceps brachii and isometric strength. The CSA increased significantly greater after PRE (48.7 6 14.5%) than after FRE (28.2 6 10.9%). Furthermore, during the PRE program, a positive correlation was detected between the percent increase in CSA and area under the Oxy-Hb curves before and after 8-week exercise training (before 8-week exercise training: r = 0.59, after 8-week exercise training: r = 0.70, p , 0.01). These results suggest that intramuscular hypoxia might facilitate muscular hypertrophy with PRE being more effective than FRE.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

An 8RM load exercise at the middle range of motion was performed in PRE, and it resulted in acute physiological effects similar to isometric contraction, such as intramuscular hypoxia and higher blood lactate concentration. Furthermore, PRE produced greater increases than FRE in triceps brachii CSA after the 8-week exercise training programs. Therefore, PRE might be a valid training protocol, especially, for well trained individuals with blunted hypoxic muscle stimulation because of long-term resistance training. As it is assumed that weight-bearing and non weight-bearing muscles react differently to a particular exercise (27), the results of this study might be limited to upper extremity muscles.
 

WxHerk

Level 7 Valued Member
Purely anecdotal, but my wife's 32 year old son has used partials for years. He's 6'1", ~255 lbs with a small waist. He is obviously extremely disciplined and does not go the pharmaceutical route. Partials obviously work and work well.
 

3letterslong

Level 5 Valued Member
I've read quite a few things now that have convinced me a full range of motion isn't necessary. For awhile I experimented with lifting in the strongest range and doing isometrics in the weak range: I was very happy with the results.
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
I remember back in my younger days i read something called Power Factor Training. I didnt try it because it sounded to weird to my. If i remember correct it was partials.
 

Ap0c

Level 3 Valued Member
My problem with partials is less about whether or not they work and more that I just find them morally detestable. I imagine those that practice them are lazy people, who cannot endure physical pain or struggle. I actually hate them. I have to consciously avoid observing others at the gym because of this seething hatred. It has been a lifelong journey to sit with this judgementalism and just let it be.
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
My problem with partials is less about whether or not they work and more that I just find them morally detestable. I imagine those that practice them are lazy people, who cannot endure physical pain or struggle. I actually hate them. I have to consciously avoid observing others at the gym because of this seething hatred. It has been a lifelong journey to sit with this judgementalism and just let it be.

Like that guy in every gym who loads all the plates on the leg press machine and then moves it like 1"?

 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
My problem with partials is less about whether or not they work
That's A Problem

The criterial for measuring whether to empliment something or not should be Results Based.

I just find them morally detestable.

"Your Feels Don't Matter, Fact Do."

Discarding something based on your feeling rather than the facts is senseless.

I imagine those that practice them are lazy people

Partail Range Movement

They elicit positive training effect when utilize correctly.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member

"Stupid Is as Stupid Does"

Basically, that.

people, often also found in the smith machine doing "squats.
The Smith Machine

It can be an effective tool, as with Partial Range Movements, when employed correctly.

The Benefit

Stabilizer Muscles limit the size and strength development of the Primarly Muscles in a exercise.

Machines, like the Smith Machine, restrict the envolvement of the Stabilizer Muscle. Doing so, allows a greater workload to be place on the Primary Muscles in the exerices, which increases their size and strength, dependent on how the program is written. That is the benefits.

Scrape The Rack Exercises

This method works essentially like a Smith Machine. I employ it as a means of developing strength in the Primary Muscle in a movement.

Scrape The Rack Squats



Scrape The Rack Press



Stabilizer Muscle Training

Increasing Stabilizer Muscle Strength require movements that engage these muscle.

The more unstable the movement is, the greater the work load placed on the Stabilizer Muscles.

Thus, exercise like Bulgarian Squats, Step Up (one of my favorites), Upper Body Dumbbell or Kettlebell Training, etc. need to be employed for the Stabilizer Muscles.
 

Ap0c

Level 3 Valued Member
I will admit that there has been demonstrated a time and a place for partials etc, counter to my original beliefs. You have changed my mind ever so slightly.

But I would also bet you a keto-friendly snack of your choosing that >80% of the people doing partials are not aware of the advantages of either partials or full ROM. Moreover, someone who does the right things for the wrong reasons isn't suddenly justified because someone somewhere found some evidence that it could be the right thing in some context.

Also @watchnerd brings up a good point about the fact that your performance metric matters as to whether or not it is the right thing to do.
 
Last edited:

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
>80% of the people doing partials are not aware of the advantages of either partials or full ROM.

The 80/20 Rule

This applies to trainng and everything else in life.

Approximately 80% of those training don't know much about what they are doing.

Around 20% of those training are aware of what they doing.

someone who does the right things for the wrong reasons isn't suddenly justified because someone somewhere found some evidence that it could be the right thing in some context.

Right Thing For Wrong Reason

Ironcally, many discoveries are made this way; The Law of Unintended Consequences.

I have found some benefical training methods that way.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
Stabilizer Muscle Training
I’d argue that “scrape the rack press” is better for stabilizers in one regard. The act of pressing into something while pressing overhead should keep people from retracting the shoulder blades to compensate for less than optimal shoulder mobility. Now if they arched their backs less they might do even better. . .
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
Now if they arched their backs less they might do even better. . .

pre-1972 Olympic weightlifting enters the chat.

Arching the back works fine for overhead press if you want max weights and have a back made of steel.

EAgc_UTWkAI5T6Y.jpg
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
pre-1972 Olympic weightlifting enters the chat.

Arching the back works fine for overhead press if you want max weights and have a back made of steel.

EAgc_UTWkAI5T6Y.jpg
Without drifting too far off topic; I was referring to shoulder mobility more than max strength. I’m curious to see the lockout position for the style of lift above
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
Weird. To me, I’d call that a “standing incline chest press,” not an overhead press. I mean, it’s in front of his head, not over his head ;)

He can call it whatever he wants after pressing that much weight up in the air over his body when standing on two feet.

MFer is strong no matter how you call it.

185 kg standing press is no joke.

(plus he had to clean it first)
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom