What's your most difficult phase in the TGU?

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
A recent thread got me thinking.

At the beginning for me it was every phase - I hated it. These days I love it, except for
a) lunge position to standing and
b) lowering from low sweep to tall sit on the way down.

Both issues have to do with foot placement and knee stability in my case.

I am curious how you experience TGUs.
 

GeoffreyLevens

Level 7 Valued Member
Definitely roll to elbow for me as well. At a given weight, one side is smooth and controlled while the other I often stall out and grind or even have to drop back down and try again. For me it is a "split brain" deal with one side much more able to coordinate using all the parts in an integrated manner than the other side.
 

Dekapon

Level 3 Valued Member
Lunge position to standing.
My left leg is much weaker than my right, so answers is technically "left lunge to standing".
Doing a lot of single leg deadlifts to increase strength in left leg...
 

Molson

Level 4 Valued Member
Roll to elbow. As already said, once I’m past that l know the rest is going to work.

That said, recently as I’m using 32kg only, I feel that swings wear me out and my roll to elbow relies too much on leveraging with the elbow. My swings feel solid, GU also, but when combined it seems a just a bit over the edge of feeling fresh. Overusing the elbow had always happened when I had been starting to work with a heavier bell. Is there a ‘limit’ of how much you can rely on that elbow?
 

crazycanuck

Level 8 Valued Member
With a newer heavier weight, the roll to elbow. And on left leg the getting up and down to lunge sometimes (without kicking the hip out to some extent). That's the less strong leg for single leg bodyweight deadlifts as well interestingly enough.
 

Pavel Macek

Level 9 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
Few months ago, I did a poll on FB - most folks voted "roll to elbow". Myself, left side (strong one) went always nice and smooth, but my right side (stronger) had troubles with heavier weight. After months and months of practice, I think I - finally - got it, and can - finally - do smooth get-ups with the Beast both on my left and right. I think I am gonna shoot a video about it - for time being, please the fundamental pieces of the puzzle in the video in this article: Solid: In-Between Simple & Sinister | StrongFirst (please scroll down, third video)
 

barrak

Level 5 Valued Member
Going down is shakier for me than getting up, especially from kneeling to cheek down movement. Recently I switched to starting from the top so I could be fresher as I go down. I just snatch or jerk the bell, go down then back up.
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
I find this tricky too. At the moment I find the down part in general harder than the up.
There are many possible factors, but how flexible are your toes and ankles? If they are tight then you can't put as much force onto the ball of your foot to ground your stance. Hard to explain here, but get someone to video your foot or check your foot. As I have mild plantar fasciitis (tight calves and bottom of the foot), this is something I have to check for.

Foot health is often neglected. Tight calves or lack of foot mobility, especially, especially for those who sit all day for work, can have a negative effect on pretty much all movements, even pressing.

Karen Smith has a good article as always. Four Mobility Drills to Fix your Performance Killing Feet | StrongFirst

I also try to hold whatever position is weak for an extra second or two. Even at the cost of a smaller bell more time under tension is a better investment I think.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
Planting my knee in relation to my support hand and drive leg when I sweep back into the lunge. I believe this stems from not being able to fully extend my support wrist.
 

Oleg_Nik

Level 5 Valued Member
Lunge to standing. In transition from 36 to 40 now.
Experiment with adding some zercher squat to adress the issue.
 

Craig1971

Level 5 Valued Member
t. As I have mild plantar fasciitis (tight calves and bottom of the foot), this is something I have to check for.

Foot health is often neglected. Tight calves or lack of foot mobility, especially, especially for those who sit all day for work, can have a negative effect on pretty much all movements, even pressing.

Karen Smith has a good article as always. Four Mobility Drills to Fix your Performance Killing Feet | StrongFirst
Thanks. Will check that article out. Have had plantar pain in the last and it is something I want to avoid.
 
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