6 Week Hypertrophy Cycle

Ferfres

First Post
Hello Everybody,

I have read through this forum but I can not find any answers to the following questions with regards to the 6 Week Hypertrophy Cycle that I read on Beyond Bodybuilding. If you would be so kind, I would greatly appreciate your help. Please keep in mind that my vain goal is to gain as much size as possible.

So, as I am guessing you already know, this is the program:

2 exercises: Benchpress and Deadlift.

Monday (50% 10RM x 5, 75% 10RM x 5, 100% 10RM x 5) x max
Wednesday (50% 10RM x 5) x the number of series performed on Monday
Friday (50% 10RM x 5, 75% 10RM x 5) x the number of series
performed on Monday

My questions are the following:

1)- It says to NOT do any other exercises and even specifies no calves. I have very skinny calves. They are pathetic. Shouldn't´t I just add that exercise? Or is it really going to be counterproductive?

2) I understand that both exercises are compound and they work a lot of main muscles, however, the deadlift which would correspond to the back exercise does not work your lats as far as I understand. Once again, I have no lats.

3) What am I supposed to do after the 6 weeks are over? Should I go to a strength program and then go back again on the 6 week cycle?

4) Is it ok if I box on in between days?


Thank you for your help,
Fernando
 

Steve A

Level 6 Valued Member
Fernando, think about how much your body can gain in six weeks. Generally a six week program will not result in any body part falling much behind. But trying to bring up everything at once can result in not much overall progress.

I think you may have two bigger problems. I may be very wrong, but my impression is that you have not built up much size or strength yet. To really get the most out of this program, you should be sorta strong already. Also it seems you are trying to do at least two things. If you really want to gain size, put that as goal #1, and choose a program appropriate for your current development.
 

william bad butt

Level 6 Valued Member
@Ferfres

Are you somewhat strong already? For example can you deadlift >2 times your body weight and bench well above your bodyweight? If not, I would recommend a simple linear progression strength program. Strongfirst has the Reload program for example. Or Starting Strength or something like that. It will probably add more size than a hypertrophy program, INITIALLY. You will build calves and lats. And eat! This hypertrophy program will be a lot more effective if you can do 10RM with 400 lb vs 10RM with only 200lb, if you know what I mean. I'm just making numbers up, I dont know how strong you are or you size.

If you are strong already, ignore my 1st paragraph and tackle this program. It is a lot of volume. If you are able to add boxing and calf workouts then you are probably using too light of a weight. But try if you want, let us know how it works out for you (positive or negative).

Regards and good luck!

Eric
 

q.Hung

Level 6 Valued Member
Second agree with William. At begin of the strength journey, muscle increases together with strength.
I never try Starting Strength. With Reload, i highly recommend.
 

Papa Georgio

Level 5 Valued Member
I agree with some of the other comments that you would get more bang for your buck if you were already strong in those lifts. Of you are, then go for it. If not, then I'd look at doing the doing the standard PTTP 5 days a week until you do. As far as your questions:
1. Deadlifts will work on calves, but don't expect a huge improvement. A lot of bodybuilders chase calves, but if you don't have them, you just dont have them. You can try adding in some calf work, but just don't expect a lot of bang for your buck. Personally I think jumping rope would do more for you there.
2. deadlifts work your lats when done correctly. If your not engaging your lats then you're either injured or not lifting a lot of weight. This is where a high frequency strength program, like PTTP, will help.
3. On this type of program, you take a break for up to a week or deload, then start another cycle or program. Give the body some rest.
4. Boxing in between depends on your fitness level and how hard you box. You need to prioritize your goals. Even if you could make it with all of the activity, intense cardio is not condusive to hypertrophy.
 

Van Der Merve

Level 2 Valued Member
I am not sure how to understand the comments. Does it mean weak people shouldn't deadlift and benchpress or they shouldn't do De Lorme routine (which was developed for rehab, by the way)?
 

q.Hung

Level 6 Valued Member
Does it mean weak people shouldn't deadlift and benchpress or they shouldn't do De Lorme routine (which was developed for rehab, by the way)?
They should do deadlift and bench press, but treat its as strength training, with less volume and heavier weight
 

Papa Georgio

Level 5 Valued Member
Jumping into a high volume, hypertrophy program with light weights won't build a lot of muscle, and will only build strength slowly (that is, if you don't injure your self). If you would happen to gain a little sarcoplasmic muscle, it would be gone in about of week or 2 of stopping the program.
If you are serious about building muscle, then do a program that focus's on correct form and strength before moving on to a hypertrophy purpose program. It's probably not what you wanted to hear, but it would be the fastest path to real muscle.
 

Van Der Merve

Level 2 Valued Member
There are many ways to skin the cat. You can jump into a hypertrophy program without strength training first. Notably, many powerlifting coaches will start their trained on the hypertrophy routine for several months before dropping reps and increasing the load. Sets of ten build strength just fine, by the way. Lighter weights are also more forgiving. As I said, De Lorme developed this routine for injured servicemen - by definition weakened by their injury.

Light weights do build hypertrophy. Eugen Sandow's training program used 5 lbs dumbbells, starting with 50 reps, adding 2 - 5 reps every session and increasing the weight after reaching 120 reps. There is more to his method than lifting, but the weights he recommended were light: Sandow workout

Coming back to De Lorme, ne thing I would focus my attention on - and which everyone should have jumped at - is how to define max in this routine. I would say stop when the form starts breaking or when reps start slowing down, not when you fail a rep. Equally important for both of these lifts.
 

Stefan Olsson

Level 6 Valued Member
There are many ways to skin the cat. You can jump into a hypertrophy program without strength training first. Notably, many powerlifting coaches will start their trained on the hypertrophy routine for several months before dropping reps and increasing the load. Sets of ten build strength just fine, by the way. Lighter weights are also more forgiving. As I said, De Lorme developed this routine for injured servicemen - by definition weakened by their injury.

Light weights do build hypertrophy. Eugen Sandow's training program used 5 lbs dumbbells, starting with 50 reps, adding 2 - 5 reps every session and increasing the weight after reaching 120 reps. There is more to his method than lifting, but the weights he recommended were light: Sandow workout

Coming back to De Lorme, ne thing I would focus my attention on - and which everyone should have jumped at - is how to define max in this routine. I would say stop when the form starts breaking or when reps start slowing down, not when you fail a rep. Equally important for both of these lifts.
See the bold part.

Dan John expands on that in this article about DeLorme

Nothing revolutionary, but sometimes the easiest things are the hardest.
 

Ferfres

First Post
Thanks to everyone! Very interesting replies. I was just about to go to the gym and it seems that about to do the wrong program.

You all guessed correcty when you figured that I am not strong and have not built up muscle or size. I will therefore start a strength program and jump into hypertrophy a little further down the line.

Thanks again for all you help! Have a good week!
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Thanks to everyone! Very interesting replies. I was just about to go to the gym and it seems that about to do the wrong program.

You all guessed correcty when you figured that I am not strong and have not built up muscle or size. I will therefore start a strength program and jump into hypertrophy a little further down the line.

Thanks again for all you help! Have a good week!
If you read our FAQ and other permanent posts here, you’ll see the first thing we ask is that you give us a comprehensive background about yourself. Better late than never.

-S-
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

For 6 weeks, this one is SF approved, and well rounded:

In another style, there is this one:

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
Not familiar w/ this program, is "(50% 10RM x 5, 75% 10RM x 5, 100% 10RM x 5) x max"

The "x5" the number of sets or the number of reps?
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
The original DeLorme and Watkins scheme was:

Set 1: 3x10@50%10RM
Set 2: 3x10@75%10RM
Set3: 3x10@100%10RM
IIRC it was a single set of each per exercise, that's what has me confused. DeLorme cautioned that if the lead in sets interfered with development of a "max effort" on the last set, the rep count or weight should be reduced on the first two.
 
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