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Kettlebell Adjusting A+A for Easy Hypertrophy (not really A+A)

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Patrik Novák

Level 3 Valued Member
Is the question about the ideal frequency and range of the series and the repetitions in the frame of one training for Snatch?
 

WxHerk

Level 7 Valued Member
Is the question about the ideal frequency and range of the series and the repetitions in the frame of one training for Snatch?

I’d DEFINITELY read @Harald Motz and @Al Ciampa on A&A training. Also @Anna C . I know all three personally and consider them friends. All three have devoted a lot of time to studying and executing A&A. They, their research, and their execution are all easily accessible on the forum.
 

Harald Motz

Level 8 Valued Member
10 times, really? Isn't that too light kettlebell for heavy a+ a snatching?
Yo can take a bell you can snatch for five, but then do repeats for two.

A bell you can snatch safely and strong for ten is solid advice for starting an A+A endeavour. One component out of a few others is the build up of volume over time. Volume for a single session and volume for a week or many weeks. The first sessions is a lot of polishing technique and resting just enough, to be repeat ready. It is repeat training. Over and over again.
 

Patrik Novák

Level 3 Valued Member
Yo can take a bell you can snatch for five, but then do repeats for two.

A bell you can snatch safely and strong for ten is solid advice for starting an A+A endeavour. One component out of a few others is the build up of volume over time. Volume for a single session and volume for a week or many weeks. The first sessions is a lot of polishing technique and resting just enough, to be repeat ready. It is repeat training. Over and over again.

Hmm.really interested so how
will be a suitable volume for snatch? for one workout when i have 3 workout in one week which every workout consist of Some weighted pull up plus TGU or clean and press?
10-20sets for Snatch and 3-5sets ledders of Pull up and Press ?Or I must doing only Snatches ?Also i have some common running as for my services in week and 3 trainings of BJJ or boxing...First and foremost and looking for some strenght training for my services and life and i dont want be all time be sored ...
Thankyou for you answers
 

Patrik Novák

Level 3 Valued Member
First and foremost and looking for some strenght training for my services and life and i dont want be all time be sored ...So i started with Snatches on your referral and i feel great so the time will show...
Thankyou for you answers
 

Snowman

Level 6 Valued Member
so how
will be a suitable volume for snatch? for one workout when i have 3 workout in one week which every workout consist of Some weighted pull up plus TGU or clean and press?
10-20sets for Snatch and 3-5sets ledders of Pull up and Press ?Or I must doing only Snatches ?

That sounds a little low. I would aim for closer to 16-26 sets (meaning 8-13 sets per hand), to begin with. Ideally, you change the volume for each training session, but I'll leave that sort of advice to Al.
The pull ups, TGU's, and clean & presses are fine to add to the end of a session. Snatches should be priority, and then if you feel like you can train other movements and still recover, it shouldn't be an issue.
As you said, you have to be fresh enough to fulfill your day-to-day duties, so you don't get to train yourself into the ground each day. A+A training should be very recovery friendly, if you're executing it correctly.
 

Oscar

Level 7 Valued Member
I gained 5 pounds (from 157 to 162; I’m 5’10”) in a little under four weeks. Muscle definition still seems good, so I don’t imagine too much of that was fat. I was tempted to run it out for the whole 8 weeks and see if I could hit a ten pound gain, but that just didn't seem like it would have been worth it.
Hi Snowman, thanks for sharing your experiment. It looks like you wanted a specific output, adjusted a program to obtain it, and got it! well done.

A question about your weight gain: Did you happen to take waist or hip measurements to estimate if you were gaining fat? I have a tendency to get fat, so I find waist measurements very useful.
 

User 4484

Guest
Sorry for hijacking the thread, but why the use of repeats and not sets? And what’s the difference between the two?
 

Oscar

Level 7 Valued Member
Sorry for hijacking the thread, but why the use of repeats and not sets? And what’s the difference between the two?
If I´m not mistaken, a "repeat" is a set where you aim to have identical conditions in each repeat. In the context of A+A, that means that you should be equally rested at the beginning of each repeat.

A set is just a group of repetitions. It can be started with accumulated fatigue.
 

Snowman

Level 6 Valued Member
A question about your weight gain: Did you happen to take waist or hip measurements to estimate if you were gaining fat? I have a tendency to get fat, so I find waist measurements very useful.
I don't generally take measurements; it's usually just the mirror and the scale. But I would say that my body fat percentage stays pretty stable, and is low enough that I can notice if it fluctuates. I ran another, less intense cycle a few weeks ago and went from 162 to 168 over 5 weeks (though that includes a couple weeks where I stalled because my sleep was garbage). I lost little abdominal definition, but not enough that I feel any need to 'cut' body fat.

My own, amateur opinion is that most people should be able to gain lean mass without much fat gain, so long as they eat right. I definitely have to slam down the calories gain any weight, but I think one can shunt those calories to the right places by keeping their insulin levels in check (though certainly not zero). It also seems like many polyunsaturated fatty acids promote fat buildup in the tissue, so the bodybuilder staple of peanut butter might not be ideal for someone trying to gain weight while staying lean.

Sorry for hijacking the thread, but why the use of repeats and not sets? And what’s the difference between the two?
@Oscar is spot on. Different words that only mean slightly different things. 'Tis the lingo of A+A snobs; feel free to use the word 'sets' instead of 'repeats'. But don't say 'repeats' if you really mean 'sets' ?
 

Oscar

Level 7 Valued Member
I don't generally take measurements; it's usually just the mirror and the scale. But I would say that my body fat percentage stays pretty stable, and is low enough that I can notice if it fluctuates. I ran another, less intense cycle a few weeks ago and went from 162 to 168 over 5 weeks (though that includes a couple weeks where I stalled because my sleep was garbage). I lost little abdominal definition, but not enough that I feel any need to 'cut' body fat.

My own, amateur opinion is that most people should be able to gain lean mass without much fat gain, so long as they eat right. I definitely have to slam down the calories gain any weight, but I think one can shunt those calories to the right places by keeping their insulin levels in check (though certainly not zero). It also seems like many polyunsaturated fatty acids promote fat buildup in the tissue, so the bodybuilder staple of peanut butter might not be ideal for someone trying to gain weight while staying lean.


@Oscar is spot on. Different words that only mean slightly different things. 'Tis the lingo of A+A snobs; feel free to use the word 'sets' instead of 'repeats'. But don't say 'repeats' if you really mean 'sets' ?

Gaining 1 pound per week is good progress, you seem to have gained good control over your diet. Good that you can monitor your bodyfat by abdominal definition, when I gain weight my abdominal definition goes from zero to zero, so not a very useful metric. The tape, works great, on the other hand.

I´ve been experimenting with more prolonged fasts and control of insulin lately, with very good results. I managed to get my waist to 79 cm, 3 cm below my previous lowest value, and without too much effort. Do you attempt to control insulin in any way?

Also, about the fats in peanuts, are you talking about linoleic acid? I read about it some weeks ago, interesting topic.
 

Snowman

Level 6 Valued Member
Gaining 1 pound per week is good progress, you seem to have gained good control over your diet. Good that you can monitor your bodyfat by abdominal definition, when I gain weight my abdominal definition goes from zero to zero, so not a very useful metric. The tape, works great, on the other hand.

I´ve been experimenting with more prolonged fasts and control of insulin lately, with very good results. I managed to get my waist to 79 cm, 3 cm below my previous lowest value, and without too much effort. Do you attempt to control insulin in any way?

Also, about the fats in peanuts, are you talking about linoleic acid? I read about it some weeks ago, interesting topic.
Nice! I haven't done any IF for a while now, but it's a very powerful way to keep insulin down for most of the day and restore insulin sensitivity. It sounds like you've done well with it. For me, in order to gain weight, I pretty much have to eat at least three times a day. I've been sticking to fairly carnivore nutritional approach for a while now. The high amounts of protein allow some insulin to be released, but not the large amounts you would see with ingestion of a lot of starch or sugar. I say "fairly carnivore" because I'll still have a little rice once or twice a week after BJJ, and I'm certainly eating more dairy than most people on a "true" carnivore diet, just so I can get enough calories in.

With regard to peanuts, it seems like there are a 3-4 types of polyunsaturated fatty acids that notably promote fat storage. I believe linoleic acid was one, but I don't recall the rest. It was basically the primary fatty acids that you see in processed seed oils (canola, soybean, corn, safflower, peanut, etc). Not really very surprising, since that's what gets used so much in processed food and fast food, which we know isn't doing anyone any favors.
 

Oscar

Level 7 Valued Member
With regard to peanuts, it seems like there are a 3-4 types of polyunsaturated fatty acids that notably promote fat storage. I believe linoleic acid was one, but I don't recall the rest. It was basically the primary fatty acids that you see in processed seed oils (canola, soybean, corn, safflower, peanut, etc). Not really very surprising, since that's what gets used so much in processed food and fast food, which we know isn't doing anyone any favors.
Its a pity since peanut butter is awesome. I think the nuts such as almonds, cashews and pecan nuts have a better fat profile, I´ll have to start doing my own almond butter. @Steve Freides you usually do almond butter, right?
 
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