elevated OAPU form check

George Locke

Level 2 Valued Member

This elevation that feels like 4RM. I did 3 reps on the LHS and 2.5 on the RHS. I lost footing on my right leg as I started the last concentric.

I was more concentrated on total body tension during the left arm reps.
 

George Locke

Level 2 Valued Member
To me it looks like I'm extending out through the shoulder at the top and not fully retracting until the bottom, but then I'm retracted all the way up until I protract again at the top.

Incidentally, when I'm doing OAPU's, I feel like blood is rushing to my head. I've been using intra-abdominal pressure for years, but only in OAPU's am I getting this sensation. (Aside from that one time I was doing hardstyle planks and started bleeding out my nose. Fun times.)
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
@George Locke , looks solid, and my suspicions about the shoulder are unfounded -- your shoulder stays down (anti-shrugged) as it should. Nice job there.

You may be going an inch deeper than necessary per the standard. Not a problem normally, but if something is bothering your shoulders, you could try cutting off a tiny bit of depth and you'd still be doing a good strength-building push-up.

Agree with @Maine-ah KB , you could corscrew harder - right hand clockwise, left hand counterclockwise, especially when pushing - and that might help your shoulder position. Also could have more hollow position (squeeze glutes, tuck pelvis under, contract abs hard), and pressurize the midsection more. But overall nice full body tension and good job staying parallel with the hips and shoulders R/L.
 

Philippe Geoffrion

Level 6 Valued Member
Maybe it's not a fault in technique but perhaps pushing to close to failure. The left arm looked strong and solid, but the right arm missed a rep. Cutting the set with at least a rep in the bank will allow you to GTG more effectively and stave away injury/overtraining. Remember the goal is to practice as often as possible while as fresh as possible. Multiple singles throughout the day are more effective and than "on the nerve" sets of more reps. Also strength/high tension training requires more rest between sets. Take your time between switching arms or if you're short on time, just hit a single per side for the time and come back later
 

George Locke

Level 2 Valued Member
Thanks for the feedback. I'll try reducing the ROM a bit to see how that feels. I have read TNW, but, as you point out, I am still learning to apply the techniques.

I think you're right that I should increase the reps in reserve. I'm not really fond of doing sets of less than 3, so I'll probably switch to a higher elevation that will allow me to do sets of 4-6 with more RIR. Come to think of it, I think this is probably the main issue. The times when I've been most sore were when I've really pushed hard, so just pulling back seems likely to fix the problem.

Re GTG: My current program has me doing a single "circuit" of 3 exercises 3-5+ times across the day, but it's not "circuit training" since I wait for my heart rate to return to normal between sets. So I'm waiting at least an hour between repeating an exercise. I want some hypertrophy/body recomp, so I'm aiming for 1-3 RIR on all sets, and alternating movements daily in an A/B split (push/pull/squat on M/W/F and front/side/back core Tu/Th). This resembles a GTG protocol, but the deviations are intentional.

Of course, the rationale behind that intent is certainly up for debate. I am making progress.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@George Locke,

Make sure your entire hand is on the table. Contact at the base of your palm on the pinkie side is important. It looks like that part of your hand might not be on the top of the table.

Find a lower elevation, ideally the floor, on which you can practice holds at the top position, i.e., a one-arm plank. Work up to holding for 30 seconds or more. This will help give you an idea about what the finished version will feel like, something we often miss in training at elevations.

-S-
 

Shahaf Levin

Level 5 Valued Member
I'm not really fond of doing sets of less than 3, so I'll probably switch to a higher elevation that will allow me to do sets of 4-6 with more RIR
NW GTG is set using your 2-5RM progression and doing set of half max reps (rounded down). How will it work with 10RM progression? I have no idea, probably will if you really own the movement.

Why are you not fond of set of less than 3 reps?
 

George Locke

Level 2 Valued Member
Why are you not fond of set of less than 3 reps?
My training history is mostly in the 5-15 rep range, and it just feels more familiar/comfortable. I just feel like I haven't done much when I do singles and doubles. Also my understanding is that hypertrophy is drops off some with sets less than 5.

I'd consider switching to a GTG program, but (A) it seems somewhat at odds with my hypertrophy goals and (B) I like having more movements.
 

George Locke

Level 2 Valued Member
If I wanted to GTG on OAPU, could I do that on top of the rest of my program, modified to remove other pushing movements? (Which would amount to around 12 sets/week for pull and squat, 6-8 sets of leg raises, windmills, nordic hip hinge.)
 
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Philippe Geoffrion

Level 6 Valued Member
My training history is mostly in the 5-15 rep range, and it just feels more familiar/comfortable. I just feel like I haven't done much when I do singles and doubles. Also my understanding is that hypertrophy is drops off some with sets less than 5.

I'd consider switching to a GTG program, but (A) it seems somewhat at odds with my hypertrophy goals and (B) I like having more movements.
A lot of what is practiced at Strongfirst is inch wide, mile deep, meaning doing fewer things better. It is hard to chase conflicting goals at the same time. If you want to excel at one arm pushups, it should be a focus and probably your sole pressing movement for the time being. It is more a practice in maximal strength, tension, and coordination then a hypertrophy tool, unless you are banging out 10 plus with ease. Also, one mustperiodize their training, i.e. focus on one physical aspect of strength during each training block i.e. hypertrophy, max strength, endurance, if you wish to excel at a specified discipline. Doing hypertrophy training while trying to also master the OAP may be a conflict of interest.
 
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George Locke

Level 2 Valued Member
It is more a practice in maximal strength, tension, and coordination then a hypertrophy tool, unless you are banging out 10 plus with ease.... Doing hypertrophy training while trying to also master the OAP may be a conflict of interest.
Evidently I have much to learn. Naively, it seems like you could recommend against the barbell squat in a hypertrophy program for similar reasons, but it seems that the difference is that the OAPU is unlike a squat in requiring more technique. I expect this is the kind of thing I would understand better if I actually did the recommended practice to improve my OAPU...
 

Philippe Geoffrion

Level 6 Valued Member
A key difference is you cannot change the load of your BW, as opposed to a barbell squat. You can only alter the leverage, while a "squat" you can modify ad Infinium.
 
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