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Kettlebell Get Ups have stalled, how do I proceed?

acutaiar12

Level 6 Valued Member
Hi everyone, I hope you've all had a good week!

I've been on the Simple and Sinister plan for over 8 months now. I've achieved Timed Simple, and am now working towards Timeless Sinister. My swings have progressed very nicely. I flow between 20-60 swings with the beast depending on how I feel, more sessions in the 40-60 range recently. They feel very crisp and explosive. My get ups, on the other hand, have not progressed really. Most sessions I do 1 get up each side with the beast, sometimes 2, but the second reps are really tough.

My question is how do I proceed moving forward? My get ups really haven't progressed these 8 months of doing S&S. The weight I've been using has stayed the same throughout these 8 months. The only progress I've made is that I can always do 1 get up with the beast, but I do not think that is good progress for 8 months of work.

How should I proceed moving forward?

Thank you very much for any responses!
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
Where are you finding the movement to be hardest? Have you worked partial reps in that range? I have seen many talks about doing just a portion of the get up many times in a row to work with a heavier bell. For instance, do just the initial roll to elbow, then lay back down, and do maybe 5 reps of that and rest. Next week, maybe add the sit up, or maybe only work from elbow to sit up, etc.
 

acutaiar12

Level 6 Valued Member
Where are you finding the movement to be hardest? Have you worked partial reps in that range? I have seen many talks about doing just a portion of the get up many times in a row to work with a heavier bell. For instance, do just the initial roll to elbow, then lay back down, and do maybe 5 reps of that and rest. Next week, maybe add the sit up, or maybe only work from elbow to sit up, etc.
It's not that there's any particular range that's more difficult. It's just that my overall progress has been minimal/stalled greatly. It's as if I'm just not getting stronger in this movement.

I do do half get ups on my two arm swing days.
 

Wyanokie

Level 2 Valued Member
@acutaiar12

Three questions:

1) What is your age and bodyweight?
2) When was the last time you deloaded or took a break? My gut says there's a burnout component to it.
3) What is the next lowest weight kettlebell that you can properly do 10 full TGU's (5 on each side) with?
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
how it is outlined in S&S.

10x1, rest dictated by the talk test, 4 times a week
Have you read S&S 2.0? Specifically the step loading (4kg jumps/8kg jumps), and it talks about deloading (dropping down 1-2 bell sizes for 2-3 weeks, then doing the step loading back up).

When you talk about getting 1-2 get-ups, are you then "rounding out" the rest of the 6-8 reps with the 44kg or 40kg? If you're using 8kg jumps (40kg to 48), have you tried dropping to 4kg jumps (40kg to 44kg)? (To be clear I got to 40kg in S&S before switching to something else, but I really struggled with 8kg jumps in the get-up. I took too long banging my head against the 40kg trying to make that jump; after banging my head against the 40kg for a couple months, I should've deloaded and worked back up via step-loading to 36kg and then took another crack at 40kg. I think I would've progressed better and even quicker that way.)

Low hanging fruit... Have you had your getup evaluated by an SFG?
 

acutaiar12

Level 6 Valued Member
@acutaiar12

Three questions:

1) What is your age and bodyweight?
2) When was the last time you deloaded or took a break? My gut says there's a burnout component to it.
3) What is the next lowest weight kettlebell that you can properly do 10 full TGU's (5 on each side) with?
1. 21 years old, bodyweight ~80kg.
2. I listen to my body quite well. When I need a break, I just do half get ups. Or I'll drop to 3 days a week instead of 4.
3. I own the timed standards for get ups with 36kg. I can complete that whenever.

Have you read S&S 2.0? Specifically the step loading (4kg jumps/8kg jumps), and it talks about deloading (dropping down 1-2 bell sizes for 2-3 weeks, then doing the step loading back up).

When you talk about getting 1-2 get-ups, are you then "rounding out" the rest of the 6-8 reps with the 44kg or 40kg? If you're using 8kg jumps (40kg to 48), have you tried dropping to 4kg jumps (40kg to 44kg)? (To be clear I got to 40kg in S&S before switching to something else, but I really struggled with 8kg jumps in the get-up. I took too long banging my head against the 40kg trying to make that jump; after banging my head against the 40kg for a couple months, I should've deloaded and worked back up via step-loading to 36kg and then took another crack at 40kg. I think I would've progressed better and even quicker that way.)

Low hanging fruit... Have you had your getup evaluated by an SFG?
Yes, I have read S&S 2.0. The problem is I only have 2 bells, a 36kg and a 48kg. And I don't have the funds right now to buy more bells. But, I've been doing get ups with the 36kg for 8 months now, and I've owned the timed standards (1 every minute for 10 minutes) since May. I've gotten to a point where I can do 1 get up on one side for 2 full minutes.

I've been able to do 1 full get up each side with the beast since around May, the other 4 with the 36kg. Now, I can usually get 2 reps each side with the beast, if I don't feel great I'll do just 1 each side. I like being able to just listen to my body and progress as it lets me.

It's just that my get ups have improved very little in the time since I've started S&S. I achieved the Timed standards within a month, then I owned the timed standards a month after that, then I was able to do a get up with the beast since May. It's now November and I've only added 1 more rep confidently. On the other hand, I started swinging with 28kg and I can do swing the 48kg bell consistently for 4-6 sets of 10 powerfully. I'm just unsure if there's another route I should take moving forward, or if the answer is as simple as I just needed to keep practicing and eventually they'll improve.

I live in a pretty rural place, so I have not seen a certified SFG instructor, but I do have videos of my swings and get ups with the beast.
 

LarryB

Level 6 Valued Member
I’ve been wanting to share this program based off s&s made by a local kettlebell gym in chicago. Idk if they are a certified sf gum but they are all certified instructors. Take a gander, maybe it can help.
Flagship Program
 

Dayz

Level 6 Valued Member
Half get ups and also static holds have helped me in the past. Complete the floor press and just hold it.

Given you don't have a 40, you could duct tape 4kg of plates to your bell and build volume with that. Might translate to the 48.
 

Wyanokie

Level 2 Valued Member
1. 21 years old, bodyweight ~80kg.
2. I listen to my body quite well. When I need a break, I just do half get ups. Or I'll drop to 3 days a week instead of 4.
3. I own the timed standards for get ups with 36kg. I can complete that whenever.


Yes, I have read S&S 2.0. The problem is I only have 2 bells, a 36kg and a 48kg. And I don't have the funds right now to buy more bells. But, I've been doing get ups with the 36kg for 8 months now, and I've owned the timed standards (1 every minute for 10 minutes) since May. I've gotten to a point where I can do 1 get up on one side for 2 full minutes.

I've been able to do 1 full get up each side with the beast since around May, the other 4 with the 36kg. Now, I can usually get 2 reps each side with the beast, if I don't feel great I'll do just 1 each side. I like being able to just listen to my body and progress as it lets me.

It's just that my get ups have improved very little in the time since I've started S&S. I achieved the Timed standards within a month, then I owned the timed standards a month after that, then I was able to do a get up with the beast since May. It's now November and I've only added 1 more rep confidently. On the other hand, I started swinging with 28kg and I can do swing the 48kg bell consistently for 4-6 sets of 10 powerfully. I'm just unsure if there's another route I should take moving forward, or if the answer is as simple as I just needed to keep practicing and eventually they'll improve.

I live in a pretty rural place, so I have not seen a certified SFG instructor, but I do have videos of my swings and get ups with the beast.

A few points to consider.

First, while you may feel as if you are stagnating, 5 x 1 TGUs on each side with a 36 kg bell does not a weak man make, especially at your bodyweight. So take a moment to pat yourself on the back for that.

Second, I would take the more cautious route and stay with the 36 kg bell until you can get a 40 kg and properly step load as described in the book. A jump from 36 kg to 48 kg is a 25% increase, which is pretty significant. From what you describe, doing the TGU with the 48 kg is putting you in 1RM territory, and that's a bad idea for TGUs because of the movement from position to position while relying largely on stabilizer muscles to keep the bell from giving you a trip to the ER with possible brain injury or facial reconstructive surgery involved. That may sound like hyperbole but it's possible, one of many negative potential outcomes that could knock you out of the game for a long time if you don't bail properly if something goes wrong.

While saving up for that 40 kg bell, one option in the meantime would be to increase time under tension with the 36 kg bell by doing reverse TGUs, which has you switching hands while standing. This might give you a nice challenge until you can get yourself a 40 kg bell and properly step load.

Also I think it's a good idea at this point to post a video of your TGU for the SFG's to take a look.
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
I recall that when I was stuck waiting an unnecessarily long time for my 32kg bell to arrive I began to increase my total rep count by increasing the sets in my 24kg practice.

this was all timeless, but I remember feeling as though I must have softened the transition to the 32 kg bell because when I finally received it, it was nowhere near as taxing as I thought it would be.

after about 6 months with the 24kg bell, I had worked up to 200 swings a day and 20-30 getups, depending. I chose to extend the session with additional sets of ten or single getups. but depending on how easy they feel, maybe sequential reps will be beneficial to you.
I may have met timeless standards with the 24kg bell because I don't remember my sessions lasting longer than an hour, but I never timed/recorded much during that period of training, but that's neither here nor there.

maybe phase in multiple reps with the 36kg over time, and see if that does you good.
reps/sideweightreps/sideweightreps/sideweightreps/sideweightreps/sideweight
Month 1136kg236kg136kg136kg136kg
Month 2136kg236kg236kg136kg136kg
Month 3136kg236kg236kg236kg136kg
Month 4136kg236kg236kg236kg236kg
Month 5236kg236kg236kg236kg236kg

then maybe carry on at 2x / side, for a few weeks, and try again for the 48kg after that volume has had time to settle in.

alternatively, you could extend the practice by sets. running additional series.

reps (L, Rest, R, Rest)weight
Month 112 (6L/6R)36kg
Month 214 (7L/7R)36kg
Month 316 (8L/8R)36kg
Month 418 (9L/9R)36kg
Month 520 (10L/10R)36kg

then maybe give this volume a few weeks to settle in and then give the 48kg a try again.

and - I would think that it may be the case that a deload before such a progression may be prudent. this is a lot of loading. and the jump you'll be attempting to make would seem to me to be a kind of peaking event. to ramp up from 36 to 48 instead of 40 to 48.

I am a believer in a leap of faith between weights. I chose long ago, and have followed through on only having single bells in 8kg jumps from 16kg to 48kg. but I will say that if you want progression, and you happened upon enough spare change (saved over time, maybe ) to get you into a 40 or 44kg bell, this might ease some of your woes; pragmatically speaking.

whatever you do - do not rush the progression. stretch it out as much as you can to avoid burnout, and overtraining.

it is quite the jump. and we all wish you the best of fortune.

I hope this is helpful.
 
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WxHerk

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Another consideration. When I teach the getup I describe it as a "bulldozer," vs. the snatch being a Maserati. The getup is slow, steady, strong, and one could theoretically spend hours on a single getup. Take a little more time and "explore" each segment. Obviously don't be dangerous with a heavier weight, just slow down a bit and get a little more time under tension. You will find your form will improve and the extra time under tension will make you stronger.

Case in point, back when my heaviest getup was then 40kg, which I had done several times each side, I was deployed to where the heaviest bell was 36kg. I got at least 3 getups per side with the 36kg 4~5 days a week with the 36kg. I gradually increased my time under tension until I was truly owning that 36kg for six months. I returned home and nailed my first (and only) 48kg getup after getting my first 44 kg geup. I was 55 years old at the time. A lot of time under tension and a lot of practice ended up doing wonders for my getup.
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
When I teach the getup I describe it as a "bulldozer," vs. the snatch being a Maserati.
from my experience - this distinction is incredibly valuable. my getups improved and became easier for me when I started doing two things,

1. infrequent Presses for my shoulder strength(which could use the help at the time)
2. unloaded getups, seeking to mimic a sloth in pace and speed.

each time I attempt sloth speeds, I am reminded of how difficult it actually is to marshal the strength and tension needed to get the most out of my get-up practice. it deepens the cut of the exercise requires more time to recover, and makes future less disciplined reps under load - a bit easier, over time.
 
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BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
Another consideration. When I teach the getup I describe it as a "bulldozer," vs. the snatch being a Maserati. The getup is slow, steady, strong, and one could theoretically spend hours on a single getup. Take a little more time and "explore" each segment. Obviously don't be dangerous with a heavier weight, just slow down a bit and get a little more time under tension. You will find your form will improve and the extra time under tension will make you stronger.

Case in point, back when my heaviest getup was then 40kg, which I had done several times each side, I was deployed to where the heaviest bell was 36kg. I got at least 3 getups per side with the 36kg 4~5 days a week with the 36kg. I gradually increased my time under tension until I was truly owning that 36kg for six months. I returned home and nailed my first (and only) 48kg getup after getting my first 44 kg geup. I was 55 years old at the time. A lot of time under tension and a lot of practice ended up doing wonders for my getup.

Just a point, he did mention in post #8 that he sometimes does the 36kg for 2 minutes a rep, which is definitely a long get up in my world. If you are already capable of doing 2 minutes, would adding any more time of TUT help with the strength necessary to improve the 48kg or at that point is it just improving your strength endurance?
 

acutaiar12

Level 6 Valued Member
Just a point, he did mention in post #8 that he sometimes does the 36kg for 2 minutes a rep, which is definitely a long get up in my world. If you are already capable of doing 2 minutes, would adding any more time of TUT help with the strength necessary to improve the 48kg or at that point is it just improving your strength endurance?
I do want to clarify that that isn't a consistent effort. I've done 2 minute get ups with the 36kg to test myself on days where I felt good. But they are consistently over a minute long.

My get ups with the 48kg aren't fast either. They're usually between 40-45 seconds.
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 8 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Hi everyone, I hope you've all had a good week!

I've been on the Simple and Sinister plan for over 8 months now. I've achieved Timed Simple, and am now working towards Timeless Sinister. My swings have progressed very nicely. I flow between 20-60 swings with the beast depending on how I feel, more sessions in the 40-60 range recently. They feel very crisp and explosive. My get ups, on the other hand, have not progressed really. Most sessions I do 1 get up each side with the beast, sometimes 2, but the second reps are really tough.

My question is how do I proceed moving forward? My get ups really haven't progressed these 8 months of doing S&S. The weight I've been using has stayed the same throughout these 8 months. The only progress I've made is that I can always do 1 get up with the beast, but I do not think that is good progress for 8 months of work.

How should I proceed moving forward?

Thank you very much for any responses!
What weight are you using at the moment?

If you can upload a vid of your getups, we can help give you more detailed advice
 
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