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Bodyweight High rep pushups & squats daily

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Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
Hey folks,

stumbeled upon an interesting article by Max Shank:
8 Minutes to Awesome | T Nation

The basic gist:
Do 3mins of max reps pushups + 5mins of bw squats every day
It will strenghtes your joints/connective tissue/lingaments and improve your movement pattern which will ultimateley lead to more strength.

What do you think?
 

Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
I am recovering from a left shoulder dislocation and my main goal is to get back to OAPU as fast as possible. Right now I can already do self assisted OAPU (like demostrated in the Breacher Strong dvd) on three fingers on my left and controlled negatives.

I would not do it as a subsitute for my normal training rather as an add on before almost daily before taking a shower in the evening.
 

Ryan Toshner

SFG TL, SFB, SFL, FMS
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Great idea so long as you work up to it. Consistency is really a major key to anything, physical activity or otherwise. That's basically what this is.
 

JonS

Level 7 Valued Member
It will strenghtes your joints/connective tissue/lingaments and improve your movement pattern which will ultimateley lead to more strength.
Marc,
I can't speak to the program, but I have some experience with the high rep bodyweight squat. Personally, I used it to help rehab a knee after surgery. It did work to build up the connective tissue, IMO, as evidenced by increased stability in my knee. I built up slowly to 1 set of 100+ ATG BW SQ per day, completed immediately after the TGU during my S&S session. Pavel discusses this type of training in BB, the section titled Jurassic Training or something like that.

Currently, I simply do a set as part of my AM SJ routine. I've found that an easy set of BW SQ and push ups are a great addition to the routine, take nothing away from other training, and are a great way to keep a little high rep bodyweight work in one's training without overdoing it or losing focus. Naturally, YMMV.
 

Ricky01

Level 6 Valued Member
Sounds great....something I might try.

I like the idea of setting a clock and banging our max rep pushups on day one and mixing up pushup styles (diamond, normal, wide grip etc) on day two etc.

If someone had access to a pullup bar I would consider an additional two minutes of pullups/chin-ups (using whatever hand placement you wanted). This would round out a great whole body workout AND a good 10 minutes of training (in one go or throughout the day). BUT that might detract from the 'ease of the programme' and the reason it was made the way it was.

Just some thoughts.

Richard
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
From BB, "Jurassic training revisited":

"Although heavy supports in the tradition of Jowett, Anderson, and Grimek are a must for a serious iron athlete, they are only half the connective tissue training equation. Full amplitude high rep work is recommended by Eastern European specialists to stimulate tendon and ligament development. Calisthenics such as the full squats from my book Super Joints fit the bill. Kurz (1994) prescribes 3x30 or 1x100-200 after your heavy iron, which should be followed by some stretches. Full stops at the top and the bottom of each rep are a good idea as they shift the load from the muscles to the connective tissues. Clarification: we are not talking about blood and guts high rep sets here; slowly build up your reps until you can handle the required volume with ease."

Tsatsouline, Pavel. Beyond Bodybuilding: Muscle and Strength Training Secrets for The Renaissance Man (Kindle-Positionen1458-1469). DD Publications. Kindle-Version.

I guess you could also do some crawling as part of the pushup regimen.

EDIT: BTW, the Super Joints SQs routine from the quote above means doing either Hindu Squats (heels of the ground) or Assisted Squats (Hold onto something like door knobs and sit back with vertical shins). Either as many reps as years you're old or (if your joints are already damaged) up to 300.
 
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pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

High reps with low rest, even if they are not the best way to build max strength, can however be a worth considering option. At least, they can maintain strength. For instance, I maintain my bent press using high reps of dips and push ups.

Here is the training of H. Walker: Herschel Walker's Fitness & Workout Routine | The Art of Manliness
Here is an article of SF about high reps: Strength in Numbers: A Case for Push-up Endurance Training

Matt Furey's Royal court use the same principle with hindu push ups and hindu squats

Edit a few hours later:
Here is an article of S. Maxwell about high rep
> squats: The Official Steve Maxwell Website
> push ups (Hindu): The Official Steve Maxwell Website

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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SolidBrawn

Level 5 Valued Member
I started this about 3 weeks ago with volume ranging from 100-300 reps per day. The summer heat and my general aversion to profuse sweating outside of training keeps most of the volume either between 0700-1100 or 2000-2200. I also typically do just 25 strict reps per set.

Anyone else working on this?
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

At the beginning, I did a 300 push ups a day challenge (in addition to the normal routine). I obtained very good results because I did them with full tension. So I maintained my bent press at more than 1/2 bdw without training it, got a far stronger front lever, and also better OAOL PU. It also helped my HSPU.

Then, I kept the idea and now systematically run either 300 "standard" push ups a day, or use other variations (slow motion, OA, OAOL, etc...).

In addition to the above, I do everyday 300 squats (either Hindu or standard, with bodyweight only).

Related to abs, depending on the day, Janda sit ups or standard sit ups with proper breathing to protect the lower back.

This morning, I did in less than 15 minutes:
(50 push ups - 50 sit ups - 50 squats) X 6, with no rest between exercises and rounds, using supersets. Very good feeling in terms of conditioning and endurance. Such high reps transfer pretty well to strength.

Here is Charlie Hunnam (King Arthur movie) training routine (basically dips, pull ups, push ups, squats and abs, done everyday with high reps): Charlie Hunnam Workout Routine and Diet: From Jax Teller to King Arthur
In several interviews, he gave the same figures so information is checked. However, he insists on a very clean diet to get a proper body transformation.

Cutting carbs + high reps can tend to be efficient and worth trying.

I think it can be true and "real" (meaning without any steroids or so) because in France, there is a training method called "Methode Lafay" (Lafay's Method in english) which is based on high rep sets with low reps. This begets this type of physique, very lean and athletic, but also quite strong and powerful.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

305pelusa

Level 6 Valued Member
I started this about 3 weeks ago with volume ranging from 100-300 reps per day. The summer heat and my general aversion to profuse sweating outside of training keeps most of the volume either between 0700-1100 or 2000-2200. I also typically do just 25 strict reps per set.

Anyone else working on this?
Results? Max Shank is rather vague as far as what to expect.
 

SolidBrawn

Level 5 Valued Member
Back in 2011 I was doing a lot of high-volume bodyweight exercises throughout the day. Push-ups around 500-700 and Pull-ups around 100-150. *cough* neglected legs a bit *cough* It was all really haphazardly executed, but I was complemented on multiple occasions on my "gains".

Fast forward to now: I had to back off a few times because I wasn't recovering adequately. I would also change hand placement (with elbows flared out) to relieve some of the strain on my aching triceps. The recovery issue most likely stems from my current chaotic circumstances. But life happens. That being said, I've noticed some more chest definition and I've also managed my first OAOLPU last weekend, which I've also been training 3x a week on the side, so it's hard to say whether or not it's been directly affected. I didn't approach this scientifically and my results are purely subjective, but my intuition says it's been a helpful addition to my training (and fun TBH).
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

High reps, combined with some cardio / endurance (such as swimming, running, rucking) will build for sure an athletic physique and will contribute to a lean body. However, it will necessarily create as much as hypertrophy than a specific program. For instance, military people are generally pretty lean, but not (or not that much) bulky.

To a certain extent, high reps increase maximal strength because you can periodically add some reps to your sets. Plus, in general, you do your additional reps within the same time frame. This means you lift more in the same amount of time...so you are a little bit stronger.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

SolidBrawn

Level 5 Valued Member
To a certain extent, high reps increase maximal strength because you can periodically add some reps to your sets. Plus, in general, you do your additional reps within the same time frame. This means you lift more in the same amount of time...so you are a little bit stronger.

Good point. I like how adding something like high-volume BW exercises in a GTG sort of fashion is an easy addition to many training programs. Do the work and the volume takes care of the rest.
 
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