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Other/Mixed MAF Jump Rope?

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello All,

Maybe I'm out of shape, maybe I'm too dumb, or maybe I'm just doing something wrong but I can't seem to use a jump rope and keep my heart rate from skyrocketing. I am trying to find a quiet way to get some LISS training on my non strength days without leaving my house when it's raining, so I thought a nice easy jump rope could do the trick. However, if I try to leisurely jump rope, my HR still goes up to like 160+ and if I try to slow it down too much gravity keeps the rope from even making it all the way around. Is there a trick or is jumping rope just not a good solution to this problem?
 

Period

Level 7 Valued Member
You're most likely not used to jumping rope, so you tense up and are inefficient. Happens to me with swimming :D If you want to stick with it, break it down into mutiple sets and learn torelax. It may take you a month or two before you can really do LSS with it. There's plenty of tutorials online, former wrestler Buddy Lee, various boxers and thaiboxers... some focus on a wide variety of jumping skills, others on just a few. Find what suits you.
For a less skill-intensive alternative, check the old 5BX of the Canadian airforce. It has stationary alternatives to simulate a 5-minute mile run. Personally, I found running a sub-5 minute mile to be quite a bit easier compared to the alternative, which is saying something.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
is jumping rope just not a good solution to this problem?
I was never coordinated enough to jump rope (although I never really tried all that hard I guess). Running however is (in my runners mind) a good solution to your situation. It’s so easy to do.
I have run in some pretty tough conditions: cold, snow, heat, and torrential rain.
 

Pete S

Level 7 Valued Member
In addition to my KB programs, I try to get 5 or 6 MAF aerobic sessions in a week using a HR monitor. Faced with a similar problem on excessively hard rain days, I use a box for step ups that I follow for the same time as my usual outdoor aerobic sessions. It is easy to regulate the the speed of the steps to a good MAF HR. In fact, it is better for me as my usual outdoor course has a number of hills that wreak havoc with a steady MAF pace. Alternately if you don't wish to make or buy a box, you can accomplish the same with stair climbs.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
In addition to my KB programs, I try to get 5 or 6 MAF aerobic sessions in a week using a HR monitor. Faced with a similar problem on excessively hard rain days, I use a box for step ups that I follow for the same time as my usual outdoor aerobic sessions. It is easy to regulate the the speed of the steps to a good MAF HR. In fact, it is better for me as my usual outdoor course has a number of hills that wreak havoc with a steady MAF pace. Alternately if you don't wish to make or buy a box, you can accomplish the same with stair climbs.
OOOH, that's a good idea!
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
I was never coordinated enough to jump rope (although I never really tried all that hard I guess). Running however is (in my runners mind) a good solution to your situation. It’s so easy to do.
I have run in some pretty tough conditions: cold, snow, heat, and torrential rain.
So, while I see what you're saying, I already despise running and while I had my first run today all I could think about was how to not have to do it, HAHA. My pathetic run this morning was only 3 miles, and I'm pretty sure it's the longest continuous run I have done in 20+ years. If it even has a chance of a drizzle, I'm pretty sure mentally I'm going to skip it so I'm just trying to find alternatives.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
You're most likely not used to jumping rope, so you tense up and are inefficient. Happens to me with swimming :D If you want to stick with it, break it down into mutiple sets and learn torelax. It may take you a month or two before you can really do LSS with it. There's plenty of tutorials online, former wrestler Buddy Lee, various boxers and thaiboxers... some focus on a wide variety of jumping skills, others on just a few. Find what suits you.
For a less skill-intensive alternative, check the old 5BX of the Canadian airforce. It has stationary alternatives to simulate a 5-minute mile run. Personally, I found running a sub-5 minute mile to be quite a bit easier compared to the alternative, which is saying something.

OK, that makes sense, I do want to be able to keep it as a possible workout as I don't find the coordination overly difficult and can do it, I just can't keep my HR in check so if it just takes more practice, I'll give it more time. Thank you.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
So, while I see what you're saying, I already despise running and while I had my first run today all I could think about was how to not have to do it, HAHA. My pathetic run this morning was only 3 miles, and I'm pretty sure it's the longest continuous run I have done in 20+ years. If it even has a chance of a drizzle, I'm pretty sure mentally I'm going to skip it so I'm just trying to find alternatives.
Well… it’s not for everyone. But the suggestion from @Pete S about box steps is a good one. One that I have made good use out of over the years (although not as a running substitute) The nice thing about box steps is that they are very scalable from easy to pretty hard.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
Well… it’s not for everyone. But the suggestion from @Pete S about box steps is a good one. One that I have made good use out of over the years (although not as a running substitute) The nice thing about box steps is that they are very scalable from easy to pretty hard.
Yeah, I agree, that sounds like a great way for me to get the aerobic work in since I do not actually care about getting better at running and am purely looking at getting the benefits of LISS work.
 

Steve W.

Level 8 Valued Member
@BJJ Shawn
For low intensity, steady state cardio, I'm a big fan of the NordicTrack cross country ski machine.

It uses a very natural gait pattern, involves upper and lower body, is non-impact, and folds up easily if you need to keep it out of the way when you're not using it. Best of all, compared to a bike or rower, you don't use it sitting down. It might be boring, but it doesn't make my butt numb.

Actually best of all is that used ones are readily available on Craigslist (at least in my area). Mine was $39. Look for the "Pro" model that has adjustable front elevation (I always use it at a much higher elevation than the fixed elevation models have). There's also a nominally more deluxe model with adjustable elevation called the Achiever, but I don't recommend it. The system to adjust the lower body tension is more fiddly and complicated, doesn't hold settings as well, and is prone to breaking.

I know that some will extol the wonders of locomoting through the great outdoors instead of going nowhere on the equivalent of a hamster wheel, but l I'm afraid I am just not sufficiently evolved to tolerate sustained aerobic exercise without a television in front of me or a dog by my side.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
I can jump rope for 30+ minutes but it sure won't be MAF hr.

Have recently begun using resistance band run from basement jack around my hips, jogging in place and sprint intervals, works awesome. Put some tension on it, feels like you're going uphill.


 
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BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
I can jump rope for 30+ minutes but it sure won't be MAF hr.

Have recently begun using resistance band run from basement jack around my hips, jogging in place and sprint intervals, works awesome. Put some tension on it, feels like you're going uphill.


I haven’t seen that one before!
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
@BJJ Shawn
For low intensity, steady state cardio, I'm a big fan of the NordicTrack cross country ski machine.

It uses a very natural gait pattern, involves upper and lower body, is non-impact, and folds up easily if you need to keep it out of the way when you're not using it. Best of all, compared to a bike or rower, you don't use it sitting down. It might be boring, but it doesn't make my butt numb.

Actually best of all is that used ones are readily available on Craigslist (at least in my area). Mine was $39. Look for the "Pro" model that has adjustable front elevation (I always use it at a much higher elevation than the fixed elevation models have). There's also a nominally more deluxe model with adjustable elevation called the Achiever, but I don't recommend it. The system to adjust the lower body tension is more fiddly and complicated, doesn't hold settings as well, and is prone to breaking.

I know that some will extol the wonders of locomoting through the great outdoors instead of going nowhere on the equivalent of a hamster wheel, but l I'm afraid I am just not sufficiently evolved to tolerate sustained aerobic exercise without a television in front of me or a dog by my side.
Is this the one you are referring to? It’s right on my way to work and the price is right.

 

oukeith1

Level 5 Valued Member
Your rope might have a little weight to it. I have several ropes and can definitely tell the difference between the two. I use a very light rope for LISS.
 

Tarzan

Level 6 Valued Member
Are you keeping track of your waking heart rate before you get out of bed?
The current philosophy could have changed recently but when I was track cycling for cash the standard approach was anything over 5-8% of your standard wakimg heart rate (tested after 3 days of rest) indicates indicates that you haven't fully recovered from the previous day's training and just going for a meduim paced walk could be your best option.
Skipping was a secondary test that we did daily but it wasn't geared around the heart rate during the skipping session, it was focused on how long it takes for the heart rate to come back to the normal (standing) rested rate after the skipping session. 3 minutes is excellent, 4-5 minutes is good & anything above means you're probaly pushing a bit too hard and haven't fully recovered from the previous days training session. depending on how big you are, big guys need more recovery time because they have they more tissue to feed. Age is a factor too those numbers were suggested for athletes in their prime, older athletes need to make some adjustments.
So there's no problem with pushing hard if you take steps to manage your recovery.
 
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BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
Are you keeping track of your waking heart rate before you get out of bed?
The current philosophy could have changed recently but when I was track cycling for cash the standard approach was anything over 5-8% of your standard wakimg heart rate (tested after 3 days of rest) indicates indicates that you haven't fully recovered from the previous day's training and just going for a meduim paced walk could be your best option.
Skipping was a secondary test that we did daily but it wasn't geared around the heart rate during the skipping session, it was focused on how long it takes for the heart rate to come back to the normal (standing) rested rate after the skipping session. 3 minutes is excellent, 4-5 minutes is good & anything above means you're probaly pushing a bit too hard and haven't fully recovered from the previous days training session. depending on how big you are, big guys need more recovery time because they have they more tissue to feed. Age is a factor too those numbers were suggested for athletes in their prime, older athletes need to make some adjustments.
So there's no problem with pushing hard if you take steps to manage your recovery.


Hmmm, no I have not been checking my RHR, but I was going to start as that was also suggested in the step program linked above. However, that was used to the find the day's minimum and maximum heart rate for the training, not for recovery, so I will keep that in mind. Thank you.
 

Boris Bachmann

Level 7 Valued Member
When I'm practiced, doing continuous light kettlebell snatches at a slower pace can be sustained at lower %s.

You'll get arguments from a lot of cardio experts that it's not as good as traditional cardio modes (jogging, rowing, etc), but I'm not convinced that it really matters. If I do an hour of continuous kettlebell snatches, you're absolutely working the heart and lungs and I don't give a crap of concern about wattage.
 
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