all posts post new thread

Other/Mixed Step up

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Over time, we have mentioned step ups several times, both for LISS and HIT. Therefore, here is a thread to gather info about this topic:

For instance, here is Bob Backlund's routine:

Without reaching such extremes, here are a few "figures" about Backlund's step ups and ab wheel routine, which seem to be an extremely powerful routine:

Below is the StrongFirst article about step up training:

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
Over time, we have mentioned step ups several times, both for LISS and HIT. Therefore, here is a thread to gather info about this topic:
Step Ups

I don't know if God loves you but I do.

As per Pet, this is a great exercise for a varity of reasons.

BULGARIAN LEG TRAINING SECRETS

One thing Bondarchuk concluded was that the heavy back squat was potentially dangerous to the structure of the lower back. In fact, according to his studies, it can be demonstrated that the back squat places a load on the structure of the lower back that, in the bottom position, is at least twice as heavy as the load on the bar. In other words, if you are lifting 300 pounds in the full squat, your lower back is stressed to an amount equaling at least 600 pounds, usually more. The actual amount depends on the speed of descent and ascent. The faster you descend and the faster you reverse direction and begin to arise from the bottom, the greater the load on the lower back and, according to Bondarchuk, the greater the chance of injury.

...he observed that in no sport did the athlete ever find himself in the normal full-squat position, Bondarchuk concluded that it would be safer to use a form of weighted step-up.

...the higher the bench, the more stress would be placed on the hamstring muscles on the rear of the thigh

...a lower bench would result in more work being required of the quadriceps muscles on the front of the thigh.

...since it would be impossible for an athlete to "bounce" out of the bottom position in the high step-up, this exercise completely eliminates the problem of the bounce.

...the balance required in the high step-up calls more muscles into play,

Regarding This This Article


1) Clarance Bass' ressearch found that contrary to this article, Olympic Lifter continued to perform Heavy Squats; which makes sense.

Bilateral Strength for Full Cleans and Snatches is best build with Back Squats and Front Squats.

a) Step Ups allow a lifter to place a the workload on the legs without beating up the lower back.

b) Step Ups are a Concentric Exercise. It take the Eccentric component ouf of it.

Resarch shows that faster recovery is achieved when a Concentric Movement Only is preformed.

Bikers are an example of a Concentric Only Movement. It is essentialy a One Legged Leg Press.

2) The Upside of The UnBalance Step Up

It increase the workload on the Stabilizer Muscles; developing and increasing their strength.

3) The Downside of The UnBalance Step Up

The Primary Muscles in the Legs are UnderLoaded; not enough weight is used to completely OverLoad them.

The Solution

Holding on to a the side of a Power Rack, anything, minimizes the Stabalizer Muscles, placing more of the workload on the Primary Muscle in the movement.

Summary

1) Step Ups allow you to place more of the workload on the legs, taking the back (the weaklink in a Full Squat) out of the equation.

2) Step Ups are a Concentric Only Movement which ensure faster recovery.

3) You can develop and increase Stabilzer Muscle Strength by performing Traditional Step Ups.

4) You can develop and increase strength in the Primary Muscles in the Leg by holding on to a Power Rack, anything and performing them with a Heavier Load.

5) With Concentric Step Ups, there is some relaxtion of the Muscle when you drop down to the floor, then Step Back Up. This elicits "Pulse Training", which has been posted on this site.

Dr Stuart McGill's research demonstrated that in movements and sports, the relaxtion of the muscle momentarilly enables athlete and lifers to produce more force.

The Kettlebell Swing's Pulse Training Effect


This is "Pulse Training". The free fall of the Kettlebell down allows the muscles to relax.

Once in the bottom of the Swing, the relaxed muscle contracts with even more force to drive the Bell back up.
 
Last edited:

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
It could be interesting to see some ideas to get them to work for:
HIIT
LIIS
Strength

I have liked them since my physiotherapist recommend them to me because of knee problems.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

HIIT and LISS are protocols based on HR so regardless the 'implement' the principles remain the same.

They are mentioned here

Strength wise, the article mentioned by Kennedy provides good information. Strength principles obey by % of RM so you could perfectly follow any kind of SF protocol, assuming you do slow eccentric in the meanwhile.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Hello,

HIIT and LISS are protocols based on HR so regardless the 'implement' the principles remain the same.

They are mentioned here

Strength wise, the article mentioned by Kennedy provides good information. Strength principles obey by % of RM so you could perfectly follow any kind of SF protocol, assuming you do slow eccentric in the meanwhile.

Kind regards,

Pet'
I know this. But didnt you make this thread to have the info in one thread?
 

Gary Wilson

Level 5 Valued Member
Whats a good height for a step up box out of interest?
Funny enough i just bought a platform for bulgarian split squat, was hoping to use for step ups too but its only 30cm height.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
@TedDK
Not necessarily. Some folks use 75% of your ‘bent knee height’ as described in Kenneth’s article. Mine comes to that value with the two pavers. I think it also somewhat depends upon what you are using box steps for. A lower height will usually make a higher cadence easier.
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
@offwidth i got this height recommended when i had knee issues. But i Think its a little in the High end. Its hard not to help with foot nr 2.
If i go for the 75% its 40cm.
But isnt it mostly for cardio or is this hight also for strength?
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
@offwidth i got this height recommended when i had knee issues. But i Think its a little in the High end. Its hard not to help with foot nr 2.
If i go for the 75% its 40cm.
But isnt it mostly for cardio or is this hight also for strength?
I normally do box steps mostly for ‘strength endurance’. I do them weighted and wearing boots. Regarding ‘cardio’, I typically am using a cadence that will keep me more or less around my AeT.
For instance yesterday I did: 122m in about 25min. HRavg 111 (below AeT). Pack weight 11kg. (and it was 37C in temp)
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
But isnt it mostly for cardio or is this hight also for strength?


Box Height

The height of the box simply determines what part of the leg is being OverLoaded; Quads or Hamstrings.

Strength Training

The same protocol applies to Step Up as it does for other types of Strength Training.

1) Maximum Strength

a) Loads of 85% of 1 Reptition Max.

b) Repetiion of 1-5 Per Set.

3) Rest Period of 3 Minutes or longer between Sets.

2) Power Training

a) Load of 48-62 % of 1 Reptition Max.

b) Repetiion of 1-5 Per Set.

3) Rest Period of 3 Minutes or longer between Sets.

3) Speed Training

a) Load of 10-40% of 1 Reptition Max.

b) Repetiion of 1-5 Per Set.

3) Rest Period of 3 Minutes or longer between Sets.

4) Hypertrophy Training

a) Load of 60-80% of 1 Reptition Max.

b) Repetiion of 8 plus Per Set.

3) Rest Period of 1 Minutes or less between Sets.

5) Endurance Cardio Training

a) Load of 50% of 1 Reptition Max or less.

b) Repetiion of 15 Per Set or more.

3) Rest Period of 1 Minutes or less between Sets.
 
Top Bottom