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Off-Topic What's your source of motivation?

TedM

Level 5 Valued Member
I've had several discussions with folks I know about training, of late, and they go like this:

"I wish I was as disciplined as you, but..."
Or
"I just need someone to do this with.."
Or
"I can't get started..."

And I started to realize that part of what sets all you giryas apart... is that you all are disciplined and self motivated...

Two sets of questions for you all!
1. Where does your motivation/discipline/just-do-it - it come from?

2. For those folks who don't have what it takes in #1: What is a good, low-barrier (bodyweight, I think) entry "program" that will result in a positive feedback loop to encourage them to stay the course, and hopefully dig deeper over time?

As I mentioned below - I had thought to try @AleksSalkin 9 minute challenge - but folks got kinda turned off by the baby crawling ... so I need something else as a starter...

The second
 
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Gypsyplumber

Level 6 Valued Member
I know it’s cliche and David Goggins is a bit extreme but I agree with him that motivation is bullshit. You just need some mental toughness. I don’t always want to wake up at 3:45 am to train, but that’s the time I have to do it. And when I don’t I always regret it. People need to get over the idea of motivation and look at training as a necessity for life. And there is no end, a lot of people look at diets and exercise as finite things like “I’m going on a diet” nah just change your habits. I also think people shouldn’t have things sugar coated, like for me, my best friends and coworkers started commenting on my “female breast’s” I was growing when I let my weight get out of hand. That ridicule was helpful for me lol. I’m not saying to be a dick, especially with young ladies but for me the tough love helped.
 

ShawnM

Level 9 Valued Member
My motivation is now and always has been for me to make me the best me I can be.

I've been doing some form of training or another since I was 6, I'm now 52. At first it was wrestling or football and baseball, just kids stuff in the leagues in my small town. As I got older I continued to wrestle and do track in high school, a time to work on a team while competing as an individual. Later in Life I joined the Navy and found martial arts training in several arts until I decided boxing, judo and BJJ were for me. Power lifting made it's way into my life for about a decade, teaching me yet another way of training and a way to compete. Martial arts came back into focus and I found that being big, strong and sort of a fat a#@ wasn't going to help me roll so I search the intranets and found Strong First and the way that we all train here.

My main motivation these days is longevity. Gone are the days of feeling I must prove myself, even my early days here at SF I fell prey to that and after a while I fixed my attitude and started to make progress. I retired from the military after 28 years and I'll be damned if I don't soak up every retirement check I can so for me it's now about being fall resistant, eating better and maintaining friendships and relationships, especially with all my SF friends!
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
motivation is bullshit. You just need some mental toughness. I don’t always want to wake up at 3:45 am to train, but that’s the time I have to do it. And when I don’t I always regret it. People need to get over the idea of motivation and look at training as a necessity for life.

My training life is structured such that I don't rely on motivation at all.

It's just habit.

It's what I do every day before dinner.
 

Bill Lets

First Post
First post

My motivation comes from within training is fun and I am making gains. People are not my motivation, really I don’t care what other people are doing or think.
I do my thing and at sixty five I am in my best condition every including mobility. It all stems from a desire in my mind and heart.

Bill
[[====]]
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
Interesting question.

1. It improves all aspects of life mental and physical.
2. It is time to myself.
3. I wouldn't want to retire even if I could, so I want to keep myself employed for as long as possible, so health is a financial consideration.
4. Save time and money on health costs. I have seen others pay heavily for poor lifestyle choices.
5. It is one of the few things we are in complete control of and can compete against ourself on a level playing field. The bar doesn't lie.
6. The process of goal setting, planning, and execution improves in other areas. I became interested in the process. I just successfully overcame a multi-month goal in not being able to do a tactical pullup.
7. I want to be useful and not a burden to others in old age based on my choices.
8. I want to be able to physically cope with an emergency and protect my family and community if necessary. Carry a family member or neighbor out of a building etc.
9. It is enjoyable to see results and progress even at my age.
10. It is part of my health routine like brushing and flossing my teeth. I see it in a medical/health context now. It is not optional.
11. I look and feel better.
12. When they were little, I could keep up with my child.
 

lais817

Level 5 Valued Member
I enjoy the training, and enjoy reading about it. Finding something I enjoy and is easy to do is the key. If you make it too hard (gym is a 20min drive, after work, when the kids are in bed etc) then it doesn't happen. Kettlebells are awesome for doing away with those excuses.
 
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MikeL

Level 5 Valued Member
The mirror
Sport performance
My past performance

A certain level is expected of my profession, I will not be one of the people who do not meet it.
 

BillSteamshovel

Level 5 Valued Member
Motivations can change over time.............Following some injuries I stopped rowing, gained weight and started snoring.......... Had to lose weight to stop snoring and became interested in kettlebells along the way. Similar to IaIs817, learning kettlebell and bodyweight exercises is enjoyable and interesting.

Nowadays the incentive has shifted from snoring & weight loss to ............. "entry level" strength ie Timed Simple with 32kg and able to press & snatch 32kg Other goals are OAPU & HSPU & hang by 1 arm & squat on one leg ........................ that wish list should ensure staying healthy into "deep old age"

...... maybe its vanity, but what the hell ..... its fun to see the outlines of some muscles peeping through .......... another boost is when my grown up nieces and nephews say "would like to be as fit as you when I am that old"
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
Where does it come from?
Dr Jason Curtis, Sports Phycologist

Dr Jason Curtis did an interesting presentation on Motivation at the 2012 Albuquerque Stength Clinic, ...

Winning The Challenge

The reserch was based on Define Fitness, a large local gym with multiple locations, annual weight loss contest that was in January each year that coinsides with New Year's Resolutions.

Body For Life

Defined Fitness' program was based on Bill Phillip's Body For Life Weight Loss Contest that he promoted in his Muscle Media 2000 Magaine back in the 1990s. Phillip's also wrote a book, Body For Life.

The beauty of the book is its simplicity.

Curtis' Research

Essentially, Curtis determined Motivation is to some extent part of someone's DNA. Some individual had a lot of Self Motivation, some a had a little and other just didn't have it.

The break down was...

1) Self Motivated Individual

These individuals, as you might expect, had the most success. They were relentless in achieving their objective.

Many of the individuals on the StrongFirst forum have this.

2) Quasi-Motivated Individual

These individual had enough Motivation to show up for their Personal Training Session or show up if they had a Training Partner that held them accountable and to push them.

One of the most interesting aspect of this group was success was determined to a greater degree when...

Bonding With The Presonal Trainer

Curtis research rotated Personal Trainers. Think of it like dating and finding someone you are compatable with and connect with.

Curtis determined that individual who connected with their Personal Trainer and/or Training Partner were more successful.

While this goup had success with their Weight Loss, they weren't as successful as the Self Motivated Group with relentless drive.

3) Non-Motivated Individual


These individuals didn't have sustainable Motivation.

They started exercise and diet programs. After a few week, they stop for various reasons.

As per.


1662289685867.png

The Psychological Aspect of Relentless Motivation

The research by Dr Richard Wisemen in his book, The Luck Factor, supports Dr Jason Curtis.

1662282238525.png

The Dateline story below (10 minutes) is the Cliff Notes on it.



The Success Rate of Lucky and UnLucky Individual

Wisemen found the Success Rate Percetage of those who considered themselves to be UnLucky and those who belived they were Luck were the same.

1) Lucky Individuals didn't give up.

They kept trying. They looked for ways and methods that would eventually get them to their destination

A great example is from a book by RJ Ringer on being behind in a race...

"I will eventually catch up to you.
I will try to pass you on the right, on the left, go under or go over you.
If I can't, that noise behind you is me breathing down your neck."


Ringer Take Home Message

Never give up or stop trying.

Alexander Graham Bell stated that when something didn't work, he did not view it as failure. He was simply eliminating what didn't work and moved closer to finding the answer to what would work.

As per Einstein, "Research is what I am doing, when I don't know what I am doing."

Another book on what determines Motivation and Success is...

Drive

1662283673046.png

RSA ANIMATE: Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us, 10 ninutes.



The Three Factors That Drive Motivation

1) Mastery


Being consider an authority on something.

2) Autonomy

Being in control of your own destiny.

3) Purpose

Knowing what you do matters.

Summary

1) Motivation


a) Multiple Factors Dive It.

b) Some have have relentless drive, some a little and some don't.

2) Self Motivated Individual

This group is like a Train on the Track going full Speed.

The downside of these individuals often is having too much Motivation.

They can be overzealous, OverTraining at times.

With this group, you often have to "Rein them in".

2) Quazi-Motivated

Find someone that you can connect with that will hold you accountable, encourage you and push you; a Personal Trainer or Training Partner.

Have enough Motivation to show up and then draft off them. so to speak.

3) Non-Motivated Individuals

Some individuals are not Motivated enough stick with it.

This group for the most part cannot be Motivated.

With that said, at times a traumatic experience may prompt some Motivation in them to some degree.

"You Can Lead A Horse To Water..."

Trying to work with the Non-Motivated is the same as this saying goes.

Trying to help them is time wasted, if they aren't ready of willing.
 
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phillm47

Level 3 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Motivation is like shaving, or bathing…you have to keep up with it. Making something a habit on the other hand gets things on autopilot. Motivation gets you started, be disciplined until it becomes habit. Does one need motivation to brush their teeth daily? Not after it became habit.

I will grant you some days you just want to say F it, but …I would also add that the StrongFirst principle of structured ‘waveiness of load’ helps keep on keeping on until habit is formed…at least it did for me. As always ymmv
 

TedM

Level 5 Valued Member
Wow. Amazing answers.

I'm obviously thinking how I can get some people I care about...started..

So, my simplistic extract from all the replies is that: The most likely route to success is starting with "something" small and (relatively) easy or enjoyable that will give good feedback quickly.

Once they are feeling good about their start- then the possibility of forming a habit or realizing that it's possible to achieve something more with their bodies - may potentially create a positive reinforcement loop...

What do you all think?

And... if in agreement: what is that "something "?
I thought that Aleks Salkin's 9 minute challenge would be good. But, frankly, baby crawling takes a bit of a mental leap... so, that hasn't really worked for me as of yet.
 

lais817

Level 5 Valued Member
Wow. Amazing answers.

I'm obviously thinking how I can get some people I care about...started..

So, my simplistic extract from all the replies is that: The most likely route to success is starting with "something" small and (relatively) easy or enjoyable that will give good feedback quickly.

Once they are feeling good about their start- then the possibility of forming a habit or realizing that it's possible to achieve something more with their bodies - may potentially create a positive reinforcement loop...

What do you all think?

And... if in agreement: what is that "something "?
I thought that Aleks Salkin's 9 minute challenge would be good. But, frankly, baby crawling takes a bit of a mental leap... so, that hasn't really worked for me as of yet.
I have done exactly what you are thinking of doing. I've tried to get the Mrs interested in kettlebells for the last few years to no avail. This year for our anniversary I asked her to buy a barbell for me.

So far she has been doing PTTP (deadlifts only) for 2 months straight, and she's really enjoying it. I'm thinking the next step will be to try and introduce her to some other movements in a similar easy strength sort of way.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Motivation from:
- aesthetics/self image
- curiosity/understanding
- function/capacity/capability

A great deal of motivation stems from confidence and success. Its important that folks see progress from their earliest attempts and understand progression. The biggest motivator is having a goal.
 
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