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All Terrain Conditioning Zone 2 Cardio Recommendation?

Denys Carthusian

Level 2 Valued Member
I just received a question and I'm not sure how to answer it. This is someone with no access to kettlebells and the question revolves around conditioning. My default recommendation is always rucking, but I said I would ask the forum:

"What do I do for Zone 2 cardio until I start working again (hopefully in 4 weeks from now)?"

I'm not sure if I even know the Zone 2 guidelines properly (questioner is mid 20's male). Any guidance would be very much appreciated. I also mentioned jump rope but got a kind of grimace.
 

Francisco

Level 5 Valued Member
I just received a question and I'm not sure how to answer it. This is someone with no access to kettlebells and the question revolves around conditioning. My default recommendation is always rucking, but I said I would ask the forum:

"What do I do for Zone 2 cardio until I start working again (hopefully in 4 weeks from now)?"

I'm not sure if I even know the Zone 2 guidelines properly (questioner is mid 20's male). Any guidance would be very much appreciated. I also mentioned jump rope but got a kind of grimace.
If the individual is reasonably strong and has worked a little bit on endurance rucking tends to be around Z1. This of course may be altered with weight and /or pace.

To get a decent HR guestimate you can always use the MAF formula: HR = 180 - age (this would be the top of Z2, so this individual should run aroung 140-155bpm)

You could also perform an AeT test under Uphill Athlete guidelines. This would give you a more individualized value. But it takes more time.

Here you can find an excellent source.

Does this individual run, bike, elliptical, row? Difficult to provide more guidance with so little background…

Hope it helps!
 

Denys Carthusian

Level 2 Valued Member
If the individual is reasonably strong and has worked a little bit on endurance rucking tends to be around Z1. This of course may be altered with weight and /or pace.

To get a decent HR guestimate you can always use the MAF formula: HR = 180 - age (this would be the top of Z2, so this individual should run aroung 140-155bpm)

You could also perform an AeT test under Uphill Athlete guidelines. This would give you a more individualized value. But it takes more time.

Here you can find an excellent source.

Does this individual run, bike, elliptical, row? Difficult to provide more guidance with so little background…

Hope it helps!
Manual labor, walking, does tons of pullups, definitely needs to tend to flexibility long term but he's young. Winter now, so running or jogging is treacherous. Would list him as strong but not trained other than pullups.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I just received a question and I'm not sure how to answer it. This is someone with no access to kettlebells and the question revolves around conditioning. My default recommendation is always rucking, but I said I would ask the forum:

"What do I do for Zone 2 cardio until I start working again (hopefully in 4 weeks from now)?"

I'm not sure if I even know the Zone 2 guidelines properly (questioner is mid 20's male). Any guidance would be very much appreciated. I also mentioned jump rope but got a kind of grimace.
Does your friend have an internet connection and a computer of some sort ?
 

Francisco

Level 5 Valued Member
Manual labor, walking, does tons of pullups, definitely needs to tend to flexibility long term but he's young. Winter now, so running or jogging is treacherous. Would list him as strong but not trained other than pullups.
Check this, nothing more simple / doable than step ups. Boring, but a great complement to plain rucking.

During early Covid we couldn’t get of the house - I love running - and I kept my base doing step ups in my apartment’s living room.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Yes he does. Laptop as far as I know.
Whatever he will do for 30+ minutes 5-6 x a week while maintaining the talk test. HR 180 - age or 60-70% MHR.

 
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Denys Carthusian

Level 2 Valued Member
Running, rowing, hiking, swimming, cycling, cross-country skiing, dancing, sex, stair climbing......whatever you can do for 30-45 minutes straight, multiple times a week, and stay right below the lactate threshold.
Okay, so just to be clear, rucking would fit if following these specs as well I'm assuming.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
Check this, nothing more simple / doable than step ups. Boring, but a great complement to plain rucking.

During early Covid we couldn’t get of the house - I love running - and I kept my base doing step ups in my apartment’s living room.

Steps up are my go-to Zone 2 cardio if I'm under the influence.

Mainly because if I fall-over doing step ups, I'm not falling into traffic, off a cliff, or capsizing into the water.

I just collapse on the floor.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I just received a question and I'm not sure how to answer it. This is someone with no access to kettlebells and the question revolves around conditioning. My default recommendation is always rucking, but I said I would ask the forum:

"What do I do for Zone 2 cardio until I start working again (hopefully in 4 weeks from now)?"

I'm not sure if I even know the Zone 2 guidelines properly (questioner is mid 20's male). Any guidance would be very much appreciated. I also mentioned jump rope but got a kind of grimace.
What is your friend's goal for adding this? I would take @watchnerd 's list (plus step ups) and see what he 1) is interested in and 2) thinks will best fit his desired reason for adding this work. Then follow @Don Fairbanks 's suggestion, although I'd probably not use a HRM and just, for ease and simplicity, say he can only breath through his nose and never raggedly. HR is fine but if you don't have a heart rate monitor there are other ways.

I also second @Ian CL 's suggestion of YakTrax / microspikes for winter running. Also snow showing or cross-country skiing... Of course my winter last year didn't get below -20F (-29C), so its not like I live above the Arctic Circle.
 

Bill Lets

Level 5 Valued Member
Is it necessary to strap electrical devices around your chest or wrist?
I have been told that an electrical device around your chest is not a great idea.
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
Is it necessary to strap electrical devices around your chest or wrist?
I have been told that an electrical device around your chest is not a great idea.
I check my pulse and hum "stars and stripes forever", and see how appropriate the tempo is. If it's a good match it's gonna be right in the low 130 bpm money range
 
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