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Kettlebell Can you actually JUST use KB’s as a primary cardio?

Coyote

Level 6 Valued Member
No one is suggesting that you should try to "duplicate" here. What @wespom9 is saying that at least some people in the scientific/medical/expert community are OK with my assessment, namely that the stimulus is less but doing it for longer might yield benefit worth taking note of. I think this is one of those "your feelings don't matter" kind of things - it certainly doesn't feel the same to walk as to run.

If we'll all forgive yet another personal observation, allow me to put kettlebell swings into the mix and tell you what's happened with my own walking over a period of years. I began by walking very little, and gradually over time got up to the point where I was comfortable walking a mile or mile-and-a-half most days, and my heart rate was, on average, at or near the top of Zone 1. And I wasn't swinging a kettlebell regularly, but once I put a few months of kettlebell swings in there, it turbo-charged my walking somehow - don't ask me how - and I noticed my walking pace and distance moved for the first time in a long time. My walking is still relaxed, but my heart rate is higher by about 10-15 bpm, now into Zone 2 rather than at or near the top of Zone 1, and I am able to walk further without feeling overly tired by the experience. Swings are again not in my program now, but they were a great change of pace and plateau-buster for me.

-S-
Yes, but did it help you aerobically?

I think we are comparing apples to oranges.

I do not argue that high volume walking, like more then most people have the time to do, or walking in mountains, or rucking, can absolutely help people aerobically.

I only argue that most people are better served to go for a trot or something, from an efficiency stand point. It's gotta raise your heartrate, and most reasonably healthy folks can walk quite a bit without raising their heartrate. It doesn't mean that walking is not a good activity, it is an excellent activity. I just do not consider it an aerobic exercise, or "cardio".
 

Ege

Level 6 Valued Member
Yes, but did it help you aerobically?

I think we are comparing apples to oranges.

I do not argue that high volume walking, like more then most people have the time to do, or walking in mountains, or rucking, can absolutely help people aerobically.

I only argue that most people are better served to go for a trot or something, from an efficiency stand point. It's gotta raise your heartrate, and most reasonably healthy folks can walk quite a bit without raising their heartrate. It doesn't mean that walking is not a good activity, it is an excellent activity. I just do not consider it an aerobic exercise, or "cardio".
IMHO majority of the people even the ones that are regularly exercising will benefit from a brisk 30 minutes daily walk.

It is efficient and injury free. Especially someone like me, who has cardio issues, don’t need anything else.
 

Ege

Level 6 Valued Member
I don't think that's true. My resting heart rate is somewhere in the 50's and I can't walk for any appreciable period of time with it being less than in the 90's. That ain't nuthin', and that's the point - it's enough to make a difference.

-S-
Honestly even an elite athlete at age 25 will have an increased HR with a brisk enough walk for themselves. So I believe walking is a cardio tool for almost all. I mean maybe there are freaks who can walk 30 minutes and keep their heart rate at 70 … that I really would find fascinating. Can it be? Maybe I don’t know?
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Yes, but did it help you aerobically?

I think we are comparing apples to oranges.

I do not argue that high volume walking, like more then most people have the time to do, or walking in mountains, or rucking, can absolutely help people aerobically.

I only argue that most people are better served to go for a trot or something, from an efficiency stand point. It's gotta raise your heartrate, and most reasonably healthy folks can walk quite a bit without raising their heartrate. It doesn't mean that walking is not a good activity, it is an excellent activity. I just do not consider it an aerobic exercise, or "cardio".

"help you aerobically" does not equate to "training to improve".
Folks I think we are forgetting the lens from which we view this. Everyone on this form exercises, is probably reasonably fit, and going for a walk doesn't 'get you into zone 2'. Zone 2 is not the only cardio. Zone 2 cardio, by many definitions (up to 80% HR, to 2.0mmol/l, whatever) qualifies as 'vigorous' under ACSM guidelines!!
 

Brett Jones

StrongFirst Director of Education
Master Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Beast Tamer
Walking is good and good for you.

In this case in particular—the walking provides a high level of daily activity (depending on terrain, load, hills etc. it may be providing a signicant response) and that level of daily activity is being supported by kettlebell training covering higher intensity and metabolic work.

Much nashing of teeth for this situation IMO
 

Boris Bachmann

Level 7 Valued Member
My breathing / stroke synchronization isn't good enough to swim laps continuously face down for 30 min. So I end up in an oxygen debt pretty quickly.
Learning how to breathe is fundamental to swimming. It surprises me still how many age group and high school competitive swimmers don't know how to breathe properly in the water.

Here is the basic lesson which a lot of SWIMMERS don't get and a lot of coaches (apparently) neglect to explicitly teach: with the exception of when diving or pushing off walls, you almost never want to be holding your breath - you should always be exhaling (when your face is in the water) or inhaling (when your face is out of the water). It is natural (and instinctual) to hold your breath when your face is in the water, but learning to exhale controlled is key. There is more, of course, but that's it.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
Learning how to breathe is fundamental to swimming. It surprises me still how many age group and high school competitive swimmers don't know how to breathe properly in the water.

Here is the basic lesson which a lot of SWIMMERS don't get and a lot of coaches (apparently) neglect to explicitly teach: with the exception of when diving or pushing off walls, you almost never want to be holding your breath - you should always be exhaling (when your face is in the water) or inhaling (when your face is out of the water). It is natural (and instinctual) to hold your breath when your face is in the water, but learning to exhale controlled is key. There is more, of course, but that's it.

I was definitely never taught to exhale when my face was in the water way back in swim class as a kid.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Whether I’m going neuperts snatch or giant protocols or Brett Jones IC (iron cardio, pun intended), for cardio i don’t do anything at all. I’m sure there are other threads on this and sorry if there are.

I walk all day at work. Sometimes 3-6 miles a day, sometimes more or less. Would you count this as getting some form of cardio? I dont Mean to sound silly but I’m just really curious on what can be sufficient for getting your cardio with bells without having to actually do regular cardio.
Walking is helpful, and if sufficiently deconditioned, elderly or physically compromised it takes on greater significance.

As to cardio health (and evidenced by the range of responses on the thread) you need to ID “cardio”.

Reaistance training generally will lower blood pressure a bit, often has no or very small effect on resting heart rate.

Will it allow for more activity with less fatigue? Yes.
Is it enough for your health? Maybe.

IMHO if it doesn’t impact resting heart rate or allow you accomplish some form of endurance challenge you previously could not, then you have your answer.
 

sizzlefuzz

Level 6 Valued Member
“It depends”… everyone’s least favorite answer… to train for an Ironman triathlon? Definitely not…

But to be in “good shape” in a limited time window, with limited equipment you could do a lot worse than Simple & Sinister, Simple To Serious Endurance, Iron Cardio, or any number of Geoff Neupert programs (KSK, The Wolf, YDKS, DFW, and even Strong!) come to mind.
 

TedDK

Level 5 Valued Member
I don't think that's true. My resting heart rate is somewhere in the 50's and I can't walk for any appreciable period of time with it being less than in the 90's. That ain't nuthin', and that's the point - it's enough to make a difference.

-S-
I dont know your HRmax but if it is 160-170. Then a HR at around 90 is under z1. So it wont do much if you Call it cardio.
 
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