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Kettlebell Gray Cook on Loaded Carries for SF

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Benedictine Monk

Level 3 Valued Member
Tried both versions yesterday.

1:10 with a 32kg in my left and two 16kgs in my right (only have 1 32kg bell). 70% of bodyweight. I could've gone longer if my right hand grip could've held with the wider grip of two handles.

"Cook'd" drill I did with 16kg for 12 min, but had to switch hands 5 times. But I went the first 2/3 of the time with 3 switches.

Think I'll add both drills to a weekly variety session.

I'm curious if there's benefit to doing one of these drills daily and adjusting non carry volume downward.
 

conor78

Level 6 Valued Member
Dan John in Intervention recommends doing loaded carries 3 times a week. I generally stick to Farmers walks for 100m as heavy as I can. I haven't tried the Cook drill as yet. I will give it a go at the weekend..
 

nickd

Level 6 Valued Member
This might be a dumb question but is this something that you can do in a relatively small space?

I would like to start implementing the Cook carry drill but am limited to either my living room or yard, both of which are not big. If I do start 'carrying' there will frequent turns that will probably morph into walking in circles around my coffee table.

Does anyone else do carries like this? Or is it a waste of time and I should only carry when I can take a bell to the park?......
 

Steve W.

Level 8 Valued Member
This might be a dumb question but is this something that you can do in a relatively small space?

I would like to start implementing the Cook carry drill but am limited to either my living room or yard, both of which are not big. If I do start 'carrying' there will frequent turns that will probably morph into walking in circles around my coffee table.

Does anyone else do carries like this? Or is it a waste of time and I should only carry when I can take a bell to the park?.....

I do this all the time with various carries, although I've never done this particular Cook drill. It's a little awkward, but works fine.
 

WxHerk

Level 7 Valued Member
Another thing about fastening kettlebells to each other...you can also thread your rope, wire, zip tie, or other fastening device through weight plates if you don't have small kettlebells.
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
This might be a dumb question but is this something that you can do in a relatively small space?

I would like to start implementing the Cook carry drill but am limited to either my living room or yard, both of which are not big. If I do start 'carrying' there will frequent turns that will probably morph into walking in circles around my coffee table.

Does anyone else do carries like this? Or is it a waste of time and I should only carry when I can take a bell to the park?......

Turns actually add a challenge to the stability. I would do one lap one way, then reverse so you don't pull Nascar and turn left all the time
 

Tim Randolph

Level 7 Valued Member
Wow. I hadn't read this while thread but I watched the video and it immediately motivated me to grab a kettlebell, set a 12 minute timer and start carrying. Walking back and forth about 25 paces on uneven ground, I did:

LH ~90 seconds OH
LH ~90 seconds racked
LH ~ 3 minutes suitcase

I then switched to my right and did the same thing.

I had grabbed the 16kg because I wanted it to be easy (up to some sets with the 32 in S&S). I am very glad I wasn't trying for hard. No way I could have done that with a 20.

Great drill. It works a ton in the "real life strong" way (opposite of "gym strong"). Definitely will be doing more carries. If you can only work out for 12 minutes this would be a really good choice.
 

Wesker11

Level 6 Valued Member
@Steve Freides , I hope it's OK to mention this, if not Steve can remove it. There is a video on Dan John's site where he goes into detail on this drill with Gray Cook. There is also another drill that they go through that compliments his Cook drill. This video is well worth the purchase.
 

strawdog

Level 6 Valued Member
@Steve Freides , I hope it's OK to mention this, if not Steve can remove it. There is a video on Dan John's site where he goes into detail on this drill with Gray Cook. There is also another drill that they go through that compliments his Cook drill. This video is well worth the purchase.

I'd agree with this recommendation; I purchased the 'Essentials of Coaching' some time ago and worked on the 'tall kneeling' drills before I began the 'Cook drill'. I think there's a lot to be learned from the static holds, and they may be a good compromise for those working in limited space.
 

User 6372

Guest
I am wondering of carrying my 15 month old that weighs 30 lbs a lot everyday qualifies as a carry. I usually use one arm at a time. I find that when I use carries in my routine they very quickly gas me, and take longer to recover from.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
I am wondering of carrying my 15 month old that weighs 30 lbs a lot everyday qualifies as a carry.

IMO - Yes! But, carry the kid with good posture and alignment. Practicing any carry must be done with good posture... fighting the leaning, lurching, collapsing shoulders, etc... otherwise you're just "building" dysfunction.
 

Smile-n-Nod

Level 5 Valued Member
I am wondering of carrying my 15 month old that weighs 30 lbs a lot everyday qualifies as a carry. I usually use one arm at a time. I find that when I use carries in my routine they very quickly gas me, and take longer to recover from.

To get the greatest benefits, you should press the 15-month old straight overhead while you walk.

But only do this when out of sight of Mom.... (cue the Darth Vader theme).
 
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User 6372

Guest
IMO - Yes! But, carry the kid with good posture and alignment. Practicing any carry must be done with good posture... fighting the leaning, lurching, collapsing shoulders, etc... otherwise you're just "building" dysfunction.

Always try to.
To get the greatest benefits, you also must press the 15-month old straight overhead while you walk.

But be sure to do this out of sight of Mom.... (cue the Dart Vader theme).

Mama is working from home today and he is trying acrobatics from the couch. He put a pillow down first atleast.
 

Manuel Fortin

Level 6 Valued Member
I also had a big baby (33 pounds at 12 months, and basically kept that weight for the next year) and built a very visible asymmetry in my left and right arm musculature over the first year or so just because of this. I am right handed, so my right hand was needed to open doors, operate locks, etc... To this day, 5 yeast later, I still have a bigger left bicep and the roll to elbow doing TGUs if much easier when I roll on the left elbow. Since I did not take advantage of the opportunity to do extra presses, my right and left presses are about equal. The specialized work of doing static holds with a bent arm caused hypertrophy and strength gains in elbow flexion and in shoulder stabilizers. All this just from holding a weight in one bent arm most days once or twice for 30 secs to 1 min! Sometimes, I had troubles with my keys or something else in the winter, and putting the little one down was not an option. A few times I got really close to muscular failure. Somehow, I always found the motivation to push harder as dropping the baby was not an option ;)
 
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