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Other/Mixed Mountain Strong

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
@Tiger reached out to me and asked what I thought about starting a ‘Mountain Strong’ thread. Since there are a number of climbers and mountain athletes who participate on the forums here, I thought that it would be a great idea. Many of the SF and Hard Style training methods and philosophies are applicable to mountain athletes and other folks interested in going uphill. So if you have training questions, comments, advice, tips, or stories that pertain to being Mountain Strong then this is the thread for you.

I welcome all climbers, (even you boulderers and sport climbers) skiers, trail runners, and anyone else interested to join us in this thread.

I have been climbing (all disciplines) and engaged in mountain activities for over 4-1/2 decades
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Recently been digesting the book Training for the New Alpinism by Steve House and am looking at how to smartly implement StrongFirst principles in with this.
This really is the gold standard for alpinists. Steve is one of the best out there.
And that's exactly one of the purposes of this thread; to integrate SF principles into mountain training.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
If nothing else it's forced me to pay attention to how much effort I expend in normal endurance work so I've been swallowing the dosage of humble to build a better aerobic base thanks to my heart rate monitor.

Alactic and Aerobic training seems to tie in perfectly with a lot of Steve House's principles.
 

Tigger

Level 5 Valued Member
Here's an anecdote. I hit the Simple Standard after a few years on the couch, no climbing. Did a couple weeks at the Leap, did a Dolt run, and did not have a physical issue doing 4 days on the Nose. A super fun first run up El Cap. Simple Standard is legit GPP.

I've done ROP, but find mace work better transfer to the angles we get in climbing than kb pressing, especially once you start flowing.

Currently running Q&D for mitochondrial development, and planning on bouncing between Q&D, S&S, and A+A snatches seasonally. Gunning for Sinister. Rucking on some days off.

Finally, doing Steve Bechtal's (is he on here? he should be) 3/5/7 hangboard ladders on variety days with a twist: I do it as a suitcase walk with a Tension Block hangboard.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
If nothing else it's forced me to pay attention to how much effort I expend in normal endurance work so I've been swallowing the dosage of humble to build a better aerobic base thanks to my heart rate monitor.

Alactic and Aerobic training seems to tie in perfectly with a lot of Steve House's principles.
Yes they do, but to be fair Scott Johnston should get a lot of the credit for the 'science' behind the training.
There is no real shortcut to a deep aerobic base, and it sure isn't sexy, but the results speak for themselves. I've put in some 24+ hr days in the mountains....
 

mjg

Level 5 Valued Member
I am interested. Do some Trad and sport climbing at the Red, had a trip planned for Colorado in July, but not sure that will pan out. Ice climbing in the Adirondacks, White Mountains and Ouray, along with some skiing in winter rounds out the year.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
@Tiger

Well there are two now. The first one Training for the New Alpinism is dedicated to training for extreme (more or less) Alpine climbing. (Although the principles are valid for mere mortals as well)

(It doesn't cover climbing technique, or gear.) (Extreme Alpinism by Twight (although dated) does a good job of that)


Chapter Headings:

2. Methodology of Endurance Training
3. Physiology of Endurance Training
4. Theory of Strength Training
5. Methodology of Strength Training
6. Assessing your Fitness
7. Transitioning into Training
8. Planning Base Training
9. Climb
10. Tapering
11. Nutrition
12. High Altitude
13. Mental Fitness
14. Training by Climbing

It is peppered throughout with some interesting and at times gripping stories of climbs by cutting edge climbers.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Insomuch as covering the importance of aerobic endurance and power/power endurance. An Alactic and Aerobic session, insomuch as rapid recovery between sets goes, a solid aerobic base means one can recover quicker between sets and then get after the next set. I would say Alactic and Aerobic training covers strength and endurance and how they mesh together.
 

kiwipete

Level 8 Valued Member
@Tiger reached out to me and asked what I thought about starting a ‘Mountain Strong’ thread. Since there are a number of climbers and mountain athletes who participate on the forums here, I thought that it would be a great idea. Many of the SF and Hard Style training methods and philosophies are applicable to mountain athletes and other folks interested in going uphill. So if you have training questions, comments, advice, tips, or stories that pertain to being Mountain Strong then this is the thread for you.

I welcome all climbers, (even you boulderers and sport climbers) skiers, trail runners, and anyone else interested to join us in this thread.

I have been climbing (all disciplines) and engaged in mountain activities for over 4-1/2 decades

Sounds awesome! I'm very interested - for getting fit to hunt and tramp (kiwi for hiking) in places like this...

IMG_0057.jpg
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
I'm stoked to get back into sport climbing after crags reopen; I have a feeling that 044 and A+A snatching will transfer to long sport routes very well.

Try mixing the double kettlebell jerk into your A+A routines. I've found that to be an interesting add on of late.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
I noted, not so much for sport climbing, but for things like rucking (for the approach to the climb) a certain 'spring in my step' under load.
 
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