Why You Should Not Be Running by Mark Rippetoe

ali

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Seems running belongs in the 'who knows' column along with coffee. It's good, it's bad, it's healthy, it's not. Runners like running, coffee drinkers like coffee. Do both of course but you may or may not die earlier or later than those who do only one or neither, sometimes, maybe. So a happy medium is to drink tea and walk.
 

Rif

More than 500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
That's only 12 min/mile, which is about as fast as I can run while keeping my heartbeat rate in the MAF target zone.

I feel a little better about my über-slow running pace. Thanks!
No offense but I tell my students that unless one can run at least 10 minutes/mile they are better off walking or rucking. Being able to walk 4 mph is within most people's reach with much less impact on the body and joints than a slightly slower run.
JMO
 

Rif

More than 500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
For those who think you can't run long distances and be strong, Rob Blair, former Royal Marine Commando, is just about to finish this 6 day 251 km ultra marathon the Marathon des Sables( marathon of the sands). Last week before the race he competed and won the 83 kg class in the British Grip Championships and took 3rd in the open!
" a back of iron and legs that never quit" indeed!
WEB TV | Marathon Des Sables
 

Tim Randolph

Triple-Digit Post Count
running doesn't improve health or increase longevity; "not" running degrades health and decreases longevity. We are migratory and highly aerobic animals living mostly in urban zoos. Our current public health issues are not all too surprising.
If you ever write a book, I am going to preorder. Keep it coming!
 

Smile-n-Nod

More than 500 posts
No offense but I tell my students that unless one can run at least 10 minutes/mile they are better off walking or rucking. Being able to walk 4 mph is within most people's reach with much less impact on the body and joints than a slightly slower run.
JMO
None taken. I run at about 5 mph, slightly faster than my 4-mph walking pace. I'm trying to work up to 6 mph (10 minutes/mile), but I'm also trying to keep my heartbeat rate low, per the MAF protocols. I'm still a beginner at walking/running/kettlebelling, but I'm progressing. Rucking sounds interesting, but my first kid is going into college in the fall, so I'm trying to keep my discretionary spending to a minimum (for things like a rucking backpack).
 

Kettlebelephant

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
For those who think you can't run long distances and be strong, Rob Blair, former Royal Marine Commando, is just about to finish this 6 day 251 km ultra marathon the Marathon des Sables( marathon of the sands). Last week before the race he competed and won the 83 kg class in the British Grip Championships and took 3rd in the open!
" a back of iron and legs that never quit" indeed!
WEB TV | Marathon Des Sables
Also Alex Viada A Day With Alex Viada: The Hybrid Athlete
 

Tim Randolph

Triple-Digit Post Count
My MAF pace is only about 127 (or lower). I have to run at 5 mph to keep my heartbeat rate low enough.
So Inwas curious if @Rif meant 10 minute miles at MAF or more normal zone 2-3 running. There is a big difference. In my case there is at least a 90 second swing MAF at 10:45, normalnat 9:15.
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
None taken. I run at about 5 mph, slightly faster than my 4-mph walking pace. I'm trying to work up to 6 mph (10 minutes/mile), but I'm also trying to keep my heartbeat rate low, per the MAF protocols. I'm still a beginner at walking/running/kettlebelling, but I'm progressing. Rucking sounds interesting, but my first kid is going into college in the fall, so I'm trying to keep my discretionary spending to a minimum (for things like a rucking backpack).
If you just want experiment with rucking, you don't need to buy an expensive speciality pack. Granted... if you find rucking is for you, and you plan to do a lot, then it pays to have something decent
 

Matts

More than 300 posts
sharing Rif's opinion on pace- in my experience, "shuffling" usually leads to a reduced range of motion and certain types of overuse injuries from the repetition of the short steps. I've seen a lot of people who start out that way end up not being able to lengthen their stride later and do actual running.

It's easy to keep HR up while walking- push on a hill, or do a few calisthenics every so often. Consistency over time walking will get people to running if you stick with it. Weight is also a factor, in both the 'shuffling' and the injury, and walking (along with good nutrition) fixes that as well. Rucking can be free if you get creative with weights you already have. Don't need a fancy pack, almost anything will do to start.
 
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Smile-n-Nod

More than 500 posts
If you just want experiment with rucking, you don't need to buy an expensive speciality pack. Granted... if you find rucking is for you, and you plan to do a lot, then it pays to have something decent
A few months ago, I borrowed an old, cheap, unused school backpack from my daughter. I put a bag of playground sand (that I bought for landscaping) in it. I walked about a quarter mile before I turned around and went home. When I stepped on a scaled with the backpack, I realized that it weighed about 50 lbs. That was only 20% of my bodyweight, but I'm not as young or as fit as I used to be. I need to try it again with something lighter, about 20 lbs or so.
 

Rif

More than 500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
Interesting. Do you mean a super-easy, MAF pace or a middle of the road ten minute mile?
Not sure exactly the difference is ( haven't read MAF book) but a ten minute mile if one is decently fit shouldn't produce much of a high heartrate ( over 125-130) . if it does I would recommend rucking for distance and base work and interval runs for form and running strength ( 800 -1000 meters running)
 

Tim Randolph

Triple-Digit Post Count
Not sure exactly the difference is ( haven't read MAF book) but a ten minute mile if one is decently fit shouldn't produce much of a high heartrate ( over 125-130) . if it does I would recommend rucking for distance and base work and interval runs for form and running strength ( 800 -1000 meters running)
Good advice. 125-130 bpm would be below the target for anyone in normal shape up to age 55. His target pretty much matches up with zone 1 in 5 zone systems but is just based on age and doesn't take much else into account. For reference Maffetone believes that if you can do 10:00 minute miles at that heart rate, you should be able to run 7:30 miles in a 5K race.
 

Rif

More than 500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
there's a difference to me between being able to run 7:30's for 5k and choosing to run at 10 min pace and not being able to run faster than 12 min miles. that's a lot of pounding and "up and down' forces on the knees and back. I've run fifty miles at 10 min pace and also ran a 42 min 10 k. Most of my training was done at 8 min per mile or 8:30 for the overdistance runs, and I was always trying to get faster for longer.
This was back in '70s and I didn't track heartrate but used the talk test to gauge my effort.

I've never seen running slow build a fast runner. One has to practice the skill of running fast to run fast imo.
But you also need the big base to handle it too.
Running is a sport and I think if one's gait mechanics aren't great long distances and high miles can really do some damage on the joints and the body
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
I've never seen running slow build a fast runner.
Indeed.
A lot of 'slow' running (MAFish) is great for building a deep foundation. But if your goal is a fast time... then ya gotta put in the speed work.
 

Rif

More than 500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
I'm fine with 'slower' but super slow on purpose always seemed to hurt my legs more than help. your mechanics actually have to be better ;)
my regular 60 min training pace was 8 mpm but sundays' long long day was 9-10. I would never go 12 just to go slower.
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
I'm fine with 'slower' but super slow on purpose always seemed to hurt my legs more than help. your mechanics actually have to be better ;)
my regular 60 min training pace was 8 mpm but sundays' long long day was 9-10. I would never go 12 just to go slower.
Agreed 100%. Your own biomechanics rule. I too find it more 'stressful' and tiring trying to go at an exaggeratedly slow pace for any length of time.
 

Rif

More than 500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
Agreed 100%. Your own biomechanics rule. I too find it more 'stressful' and tiring trying to go at an exaggeratedly slow pace for any length of time.
Yes and that's why I like the talk test method. As your conditioning increases you can go faster but at the same RPE and probably the same heartrate
 
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