Review Form check kettlebell swing 16kg

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Hi there!
I have recently incorporated the kettlebell swing into my workout, but I am not quite sure if i do it right. Am I hinging deep enough? Is my back safe? I would really appreciate it if you could comment on my form!
Thanks for your great work.
Tobias

 

elli

More than 5000 posts
Hi!
The timing seems to be a bit odd - too knee dominant/ squatty. imho!
shins vertical, more explosive hips, do not work with the knees.
avoid forward head posture, pack your shoulders, more plank-like and tighter core without tilting your pelvic too much.
again: just my two cents
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Hi @TobiasNeuffer, welcome to the forum!

It looks like you're trying to push the kettlebell directly with the hips on the upswing. This throws the timing off and is less effective. Just focus on your body's movements -- from tight hinge to tight plank, and the kettlebell will do it's thing correctly.

Kettlebell deadlifts really help find the correct hinge and plank positions and teach your body to move well between the two. Do you have a copy of S&S? It goes in depth on this subject.
 

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Hi!
The timing seems to be a bit odd - too knee dominant/ squatty. imho!
shins vertical, more explosive hips, do not work with the knees.
avoid forward head posture, pack your shoulders, more plank-like and tighter core without tilting your pelvic too much.
again: just my two cents
Thank you very much for your feedback, Elli. This helps me a lot. I just don't quite understand how I can stop working with my knees. Don't I need to bend and straighten them during the Transaktionskosten from hinge to plank?
 

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Hi @TobiasNeuffer, welcome to the forum!

It looks like you're trying to push the kettlebell directly with the hips on the upswing. This throws the timing off and is less effective. Just focus on your body's movements -- from tight hinge to tight plank, and the kettlebell will do it's thing correctly.

Kettlebell deadlifts really help find the correct hinge and plank positions and teach your body to move well between the two. Do you have a copy of S&S? It goes in depth on this subject.
Hi Anna, thanks for your help. Yes, I have a copy of S&S. But I guess I have to re-read the chapter about the swing. I find it surprisingly hard to pay attention to all the details while swinging the bell. My main problem is the endposition of the hinge. At what point exactly should I explode?
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
But I guess I have to re-read the chapter about the swing.
Reread the chapter on the deadlift first. Every point is fundamental to the swing.

what point exactly should I explode?
It's really important to have the hinge and plank positions nailed down before adding explosiveness.

Can you practice and then upload a video of your kettlebell deadlift? You can use 16kg, but 24 or heavier would be better.

But to answer your question, when you're in the hinge and the hamstrings are stretched like a bow and loaded, and the kettlebell has finished moving backwards, then you reverse its momentum by moving your body explosively to the standing plank position, the same way you do when you jump.
 

elli

More than 5000 posts
Thank you very much for your feedback, Elli. This helps me a lot. I just don't quite understand how I can stop working with my knees. Don't I need to bend and straighten them during the Transaktionskosten from hinge to plank?
it helps me to think 'hips first', before straightening the knees.
 

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Thank you very much for your feedback, Elli. This helps me a lot. I just don't quite understand how I can stop working with my knees. Don't I need to bend and straighten them during the Transaktionskosten from hinge to plank?
And of course "Transaktionskosten" is supposed to mean "transition". That was my german auto-correction kicking in;)
 

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Reread the chapter on the deadlift first. Every point is fundamental to the swing.



It's really important to have the hinge and plank positions nailed down before adding explosiveness.

Can you practice and then upload a video of your kettlebell deadlift? You can use 16kg, but 24 or heavier would be better.

But to answer your question, when you're in the hinge and the hamstrings are stretched like a bow and loaded, and the kettlebell has finished moving backwards, then you reverse its momentum by moving your body explosively to the standing plank position, the same way you do when you jump.
Hi Anna! Thank you again for your valuable advice. I reread the chapter about the deadlift which was indeed very helpful and I practiced the deadlift. Here is my video.
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
That looks great! Solid movement, you've incorporated all the major points. Nice work.

Focus on getting really tight at the top as you come into the standing plank position -- quads tight, glutes tight, abs braced for a punch, shoulders actively pulled down and armpits tight, chest up. This "feed-forward tension" has a purpose - it's more than is necessary to complete the movement (so it may seem counterintuitive; i.e. why do I want to make it harder than it is? why work harder than necessary?), but the practice of tension will help bring power to and effectiveness to your swings, especially as the weight gets heavier.
 

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Thank you again Anna! I might have underestimated the complexity of the movement when I started. So guess I'll go step by step from now on: I'll practice deadlifts for a while until I can execute them correctly without thinking about it and then move on to the next steps in the book. I'll post my shiny new swing in a couple of weeks for review again, if I may. Greetings from Berlin!
 

TobiasNeuffer

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
That looks great! Solid movement, you've incorporated all the major points. Nice work.

Focus on getting really tight at the top as you come into the standing plank position -- quads tight, glutes tight, abs braced for a punch, shoulders actively pulled down and armpits tight, chest up. This "feed-forward tension" has a purpose - it's more than is necessary to complete the movement (so it may seem counterintuitive; i.e. why do I want to make it harder than it is? why work harder than necessary?), but the practice of tension will help bring power to and effectiveness to your swings, especially as the weight gets heavier.
I have one last question though. I just realized that I can execute the deadlift with much less flexion in my knees (l have long arms and flexible hamstrings). That way I feel much more tension in my hamstrings. Should I go for minimal knee flexion and maximal hamstrings tension (I have always been Kind of confused about that).
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
I have one last question though. I just realized that I can execute the deadlift with much less flexion in my knees (l have long arms and flexible hamstrings). That way I feel much more tension in my hamstrings. Should I go for minimal knee flexion and maximal hamstrings tension (I have always been Kind of confused about that).
Generally, yes. Tension in the hamstrings is good. Just don't get so straight-legged that your shoulders are no longer above your hips. Also, make sure to keep tension in your lats to keep the weight from swinging out. Pavel even suggests to "swim" the kettelbell back to land between or behind your heels at the bottom of the kettlebell deadlift. This helps get the feeling of tension in the lats.

You'll probably have more questions.... Keep 'em coming!
 
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