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Other/Mixed Mountain Strong

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
How would you feel about sharing some more detail?
Beta tested the split on 21 November 2022.

The split was inspired by Rob Shaul's Fundamental 4 Strength plan, but two couplets of 8x3 (Front Squat/Weighted Pullup and Bench/Deadlift) would probably take entirely too long and most gyms I've been in don't quite allow for this to flow properly.

My version looks like this:
  1. Bench: 8x3 increasing load till x3 hard but doable (5x3 sets across with said load)
  2. Front Squat: 8x3 under same as 1.
  3. Deadlift: 5,3,2 start at a 10RM
For 1. and 2., per the article, this is basically test on the first day, then subsequent sessions drop the load by 10 lbs, and keep it at that loads for sessions 3 and 4. Sessions 5 and 6 are at first day load minus 5 lbs, and sessions 7 and 8 are at the 'test day' load. This is basically a step cycle per PTTP.

For 3. Just keep increasing linearly through the cycle until 5,3,2 gets to be difficult.

The 9th Session per this planned cycle is try another loading and rinse and repeat.

As for 21 November's session: 205 lbs on the Front Squat and Bench Press for 5x3 apiece (warmup loads were 135 lbs, 155 lbs, and 175 lbs respectively) and 295 lbs for deadlift.

Ideally this split is designed to be done 2x/week allowing me to do either 2x A&A and 1x LISS type run/ruck/stepups or row session, or 2x LISS and 1x A&A session in a five day span of a week. However if my schedule gets nuts for military matters it can be done as one session a week covering the squat, press, and hinge movement with pullups (1-5 reps) superset between each exercise.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Below is a MTI leg complex called 'leg blaster' and a study they did to see how it compares with a regular % based progression for squat strength.

It seems it worked as well as a regular approach.

Here is a description of the complex:

Basically, that's n rounds (up to 5) and can be done with a weight vest or any kind of weight:
- 20x air squats
- 20x in-place lunges (10x each leg)
- 20x jumping lunges (10x each leg)
- 10x squat jumps

I used it for a while and it worked well as far as running abilities (uphill running especially). Thinking about it, I think that bulgarian split quats would be "better" than the in-place lunges, and would do "power jump" to get a hinge motion (instead of 10 squat jumps).

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

ShawnM

Level 9 Valued Member
Hello,

Below is a MTI leg complex called 'leg blaster' and a study they did to see how it compares with a regular % based progression for squat strength.

It seems it worked as well as a regular approach.

Here is a description of the complex:

Basically, that's n rounds (up to 5) and can be done with a weight vest or any kind of weight:
- 20x air squats
- 20x in-place lunges (10x each leg)
- 20x jumping lunges (10x each leg)
- 10x squat jumps

I used it for a while and it worked well as far as running abilities (uphill running especially). Thinking about it, I think that bulgarian split quats would be "better" than the in-place lunges, and would do "power jump" to get a hinge motion (instead of 10 squat jumps).

Kind regards,

Pet'
Thanks for posting this, I had forgotten about it. I used this exact program about 12-14 years ago to get ready for a deployment and it worked great! I ran it as my only lower body work 3 days a week for about 3 months. The only changes I made was I ditched the jumping lunges due to knee issues and replaced them with step ups after the lunges. Instead of maintain leg strength, tested in my max squat, I was able to add 10-15 kilo's. I the same reaction doing nothing but Prowler Sprints for 50 meters, 6-10 rounds,a lot of weight, 3 days a week. Max squat went up, body weight dropped, and my running times dropped. The body weight changes were probably from the vomiting.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello,

Below is a MTI leg complex called 'leg blaster' and a study they did to see how it compares with a regular % based progression for squat strength.

It seems it worked as well as a regular approach.

Here is a description of the complex:

Basically, that's n rounds (up to 5) and can be done with a weight vest or any kind of weight:
- 20x air squats
- 20x in-place lunges (10x each leg)
- 20x jumping lunges (10x each leg)
- 10x squat jumps

I used it for a while and it worked well as far as running abilities (uphill running especially). Thinking about it, I think that bulgarian split quats would be "better" than the in-place lunges, and would do "power jump" to get a hinge motion (instead of 10 squat jumps).

Kind regards,

Pet'
Funnily enough one of my other splits I designed recently is a power clean-press-deadlift split with a single mini leg blaster progressing to full leg blaster every evening for five days straight in a grease the groove fashion.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @LoneRider

I think you are perfectly right to get a hinge motion with the clean & deadlift because that's usually fairly difficult to mimick this pattern using bodyweight only (at least in a way we can benefit from)

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello @LoneRider

I think you are perfectly right to get a hinge motion with the clean & deadlift because that's usually fairly difficult to mimick this pattern using bodyweight only (at least in a way we can benefit from)

Kind regards,

Pet'
For the Pull-Press-Pull:

1) Power Clean 9x2 (warm up the first four and 5x2 are hard but doable)
2) Press 8x3
3) Deadlift 1x5 (stole this set/rep scheme from three different strength programs I know, given that I’m doing a lot of hinging with the power clean. It’s gonna be loaded off a 5TRM calculated from a Training Max).
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Here is another interesting MTI mini study:

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,

Here is another interesting MTI mini study:

Kind regards,

Pet'
I kinda wish that SF would publish some of their experiments like this more. I know that they have mentioned doing them a bunch, but we never get to see the results or the methods.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,


I am still curious about author's take on regular LSD, regardless we talk about running or rucking

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Anders

Level 6 Valued Member
I would be interesting in what the relationship between Kettlebell bonding protocols and this Snatch walking protocol is. I would also be curious in what would be the best way to combine this two protocols.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
Hello,


I am still curious about author's take on regular LSD, regardless we talk about running or rucking

Kind regards,

Pet'
Please ask in a comment on the article itself.

-S-
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
Hello,

Here is another interesting MTI mini study:

Kind regards,

Pet'
Nothing was said about the training history of the participants and the study size was quite small.

-S-
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Nothing was said about the training history of the participants and the study size was quite small.

-S-
That’s the biggest issue with many of their studies. The sample sizes are generally very small and maybe not run very long, and maybe recycle participants.

In some cases though, they rapidly ID trends that are uniformly observed - just running the study gives them usable data they didn’t have prior.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Finished the year off with an easy 5.38 km run on level ground staying entirely in the Z1-Z2 range for the first time.

Ordinarily I have occassional spikes into Zone 3, but this was a big win.

The workout was a walk of 1.3 KM to the track, then 22 minutes of running (2.33 km worth) then 1.7 km walking back. It’s a little win for the LSD run but boy did it feel great that I stayed within the heart rate zone I set without having to slow down to a walk once in the 22 minutes.

Now I’m thinking of how the snatch walk can be used if the weather sucks and I can’t run.
 
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pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Below is Derek's answer (regarding his take on regular LSD and my last post (n° 390) in this thead):
I follow one of two heart rate specific protocols, once a week, utilizing step-ups. These protocols are highlighted in All-Terrain Conditioning. I feel step-ups and snatches translate into the mountains more than any other two exercises.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello,

Below is Derek's answer (regarding his take on regular LSD and my last post (n° 390) in this thead):
I follow one of two heart rate specific protocols, once a week, utilizing step-ups. These protocols are highlighted in All-Terrain Conditioning. I feel step-ups and snatches translate into the mountains more than any other two exercises.

Kind regards,

Pet'
Loaded stepups I assume? Or unloaded? Or did you do both?
 

TrailNRG

Level 6 Valued Member
If I didn’t live in the mountains I would even consider trying it.
And that’s the prescription; use weighted step-ups in a progressive pattern when training in mountain environments isn’t an option. I caught wind of this approach from Mark Twight who successfully summited east coast based clients. Given a preference I’m 110% with you!
 
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