Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello everyone. Posted a few things in this "Body weight" forum lately. Really glad to have found a group of people who can help me with my questions regarding TNW.

I am 6'1, 154 pound male. Body fat about 12% (could be wrong, that's what it looks like compared to pictures though)

No injuries, although elbow and patella tendon occasionally give me trouble if I overdo it. I move pretty well, can wall walk, bridge, do reverse pushups, etc..

Basically I'm looking for more info regarding how to get your conditioning while following Naked Warrior. In the past I have followed combat conditioning on the side, but want to know how someone would achieve conditioning training with pure NW.

I understand that it is a pure strength program. I'm wondering how an individual who wants to keep the naked warrior as a "closed system" (adding nothing) would get his conditioning needs met.

I have read the posts regarding Strength Aerobics: A Powerful Alternative to HIIT and StrongFirst Roadwork. I plan on incorporating those in at some point.

Pavel recommends skipping rope for the calf muscles in the FAQ, but I'm not sure if this is where I'm supposed to be getting a lot of my conditioning from or what.

So is it strength aerobics + road work + rope skipping? Is that proper conditioning for NW?

Once again I am asking this with the intent of keeping NW pure and with no other programs or exercises involved.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Jak Nieuwenhuis
Pavel recommends skipping rope for the calf muscles in the FAQ, but I'm not sure if this is where I'm supposed to be getting a lot of my conditioning from or what.
When I was into boxing, I did lots of skipping rope. A session of 45 minutes, with different rythm (fast, slow, double unders, only 1 foot, etc...). It is quite taxing at the beginning, but extremely efficient. Then, you get used to it. So yes it is a good conditioning session and a good conditioning method IMO. It pairs well with NW.

So is it strength aerobics + road work + rope skipping? Is that proper conditioning for NW?
NW can be used "all day long". This means you do not necessarily have to do a NW session with X reps of OAOL PU (or variation) and Y rep of pistol (or variation). You do reps here and there.

If we consider you do NW with OAP + pistol, then, I'd not go for strength aerobics because it will add OAP and pistol volume. So it will give you a "mix" of conditioning and NW. However, as you mentioned, you want to keep NW as pure as possible. Then, I'd go for sessions of "pure conditioning" (swings, skipping rope, running, swimming, etc...) 2 or 3 times a week. Simultaneously and throughout the day, I'd hit my reps here and there of "pure NW".

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
. I'm wondering how an individual who wants to keep the naked warrior as a "closed system" (adding nothing) would get his conditioning needs met.
I think that in the strictest sense of the word... you wouldn't. Or maybe more precisely couldn't. In my mind they are two different things.
But that's not to say that you couldn't run TNW, with some conditioning concurrently. Much like what @pet' was getting at.
 

JonS

Level 7 Valued Member
Towards the end of the book, Pavel recommends adding a big pull, such as snatches or DL. I've had best results with snatches, but swings are excellent too, especially if your snatch form isn't developed yet.
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello,

@Jak Nieuwenhuis

When I was into boxing, I did lots of skipping rope. A session of 45 minutes, with different rythm (fast, slow, double unders, only 1 foot, etc...). It is quite taxing at the beginning, but extremely efficient. Then, you get used to it. So yes it is a good conditioning session and a good conditioning method IMO. It pairs well with NW.


NW can be used "all day long". This means you do not necessarily have to do a NW session with X reps of OAOL PU (or variation) and Y rep of pistol (or variation). You do reps here and there.

If we consider you do NW with OAP + pistol, then, I'd not go for strength aerobics because it will add OAP and pistol volume. So it will give you a "mix" of conditioning and NW. However, as you mentioned, you want to keep NW as pure as possible. Then, I'd go for sessions of "pure conditioning" (swings, skipping rope, running, swimming, etc...) 2 or 3 times a week. Simultaneously and throughout the day, I'd hit my reps here and there of "pure NW".

Kind regards,

Pet'
After reading the excellent The Cost of Adaptation , it seems that he urges you to get a lot of your conditioning from being active outdoors as well (hiking, swimming, walking, etc.).

And for body weight students he says you should do swings almost every day for lower body conditioning.

I think he also mentions that there is no one correct answer.. so there you have it ..
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Jak Nieuwenhuis
do not you already do furey's routine, which is pretty conditioning oriented ?

So would you train Furey + other conditioning training + NW ?

Be careful of not overtaining

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello,

@Jak Nieuwenhuis
do not you already do furey's routine, which is pretty conditioning oriented ?

So would you train Furey + other conditioning training + NW ?

Be careful of not overtaining

Kind regards,

Pet'
I do. This post was to learn how I would get my conditioning without Furey's program, if I decided to pursue pure NW at some point.

I would like to try the SFB course (not cert) at some point and want an alright grasp on the principles in NW before spending the money and attending a course, so I figured running pure NW would be beneficial at some point.

Thanks for the warning though :)
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Isn't the whole purpose of NW the 'N' part?
i.e. Naked? Without implements, and props. Something one can do virtually anywhere at anytime...

I know the chief talks about adding a big pull to round things out. So in keeping with the minimalist philosophy I would do pull-ups if necessary. If you want conditioning... walk, ruck, run.
Of course that begs the question or at least promotes the definition... Conditioning for what? As with any training it should be aligned with your goals and ambitions. 100swings might be excessive for some, and woefully light for many others.
I certainly don't buy the thought that some swings for conditioning will have you ready for anything. And that's not saying anything against swings. I do them 5 days a week.

Just an opinion...
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@offwidth
+1

Conditioning for what? As with any training it should be aligned with your goals and ambitions
For that, it is true. Nothing beats specificity when you have a clear goal.

If you want conditioning... walk, ruck, run.
Oldtime strongmen used to walk a lot as "conditioning" if I remember well some readings. For a while, I rucked a lot with a 10kg back pack. This is a fool proof (perfect for me then !) solution that works extremely well.

Related to daily swings, I think they are a good "compromise". They give a very general training and are fast to do, do not take space, they are "convenient" to a certain extent.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
@Jak Nieuwenhuis
I used to focus on conditioning a lot, too.
But honestly, the minimum effective dose is 100 1H-swings done 2-3/week. I'd recommend investing more of your energy into getting strong.

Strong FIRST right? :)

And yes, I've been thinking the same lately.

Concerning the swings, do you warm up using the S and S warm up? Or just jump straight in?
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
Isn't the whole purpose of NW the 'N' part?
i.e. Naked? Without implements, and props. Something one can do virtually anywhere at anytime...

I know the chief talks about adding a big pull to round things out. So in keeping with the minimalist philosophy I would do pull-ups if necessary. If you want conditioning... walk, ruck, run.
Of course that begs the question or at least promotes the definition... Conditioning for what? As with any training it should be aligned with your goals and ambitions. 100swings might be excessive for some, and woefully light for many others.
I certainly don't buy the thought that some swings for conditioning will have you ready for anything. And that's not saying anything against swings. I do them 5 days a week.

Just an opinion...
You go deeper into the subject than I thought anyone would!

And to answer your question, I would just like a healthy level of general endurance. Nothing major, not running marathons. But I've noticed the difference (less breath and leg endurance) in my daily life when I am on Naked Warrior and focusing soley on strength vs. when I'm doing a conditioning program on the side, or running S and S.

But I suppose that's also something I must accept, I will feel different on each program. I feel much stronger when just running NW by itself, rather than with a conditioning program on the side. Makes you think how it all comes from the same "bank" in a sense.

Responding to your post clarified a lot of questions in my own head..
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Jak Nieuwenhuis
3 or 4 swings sessions a week can be "enough" if you do not have special expectations, at least no other expectation than "I can walk or run without grasping for air" or "being healthy, with a good balance between strength & cardio". Basically, this is some kind of "GPP".

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
Strong FIRST right? :)

And yes, I've been thinking the same lately.

Concerning the swings, do you warm up using the S and S warm up? Or just jump straight in?
My general warm up before every session looks like this:

1a: SF hip bridge 3x5
1b: dead bugs 3x5/limb

2a: halos(16kg) 3x5/side
2b: push ups(SF style) 3x5
2b: goblet squats(40-48kg) 3x5

It is slightly modified from the original in S&S and tailored to my needs but does not take longer than 10mins.
 

Harry Westgate

Level 6 Valued Member
My recommendation would be to add the S&S swing protocol. Though if you don't own any kettlebells and/or really don't want to add any equipment, you could do what I did for quite some time before I invested in kettlebells, which was to do the NW as written plus some long, slow runs.

These runs would typically be done whenever was convenient. I'd just set aside anywhere from 30-60mins in which to do them. On average I think I did 3 or 4 runs per week. I felt good. Plus I was boxing as well and felt plenty fit enough for hard sparring. I sometimes added hill sprints as and when I wanted some variety but the long runs were my park bench conditioning drill.

Like I first said though, my first choice these days would be swings. Big bang for your buck; the big pull that The Chief actually advises in The Naked Warrior book, plus conditioning.
 

JonS

Level 7 Valued Member
Like I first said though, my first choice these days would be swings. Big bang for your buck; the big pull that The Chief actually advises in The Naked Warrior book, plus conditioning
Solid advice here, and throughout this thread. I believe that swings are the best option for most folks, until they learn the KB snatch.

which was to do the NW as written plus some long, slow runs.
Also a good option. In fact, I'd alternate days of LSD work with the swings, and GTG the NW movements, if it aligns with ones' goals, time available and recovIery ability. I do something similar in my current training.
 

Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
If kettlebells are not an option for you, you could also consider crawling (in fact you can also add it to kb).
Check out Aleks Salkin and Original Strength for some great tutorials.
Crawling will also help you with OAP and pistols and help you move better in general. It is really an underrated move and help you with all kinds of physical endeavours.
 
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